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Palit Daytona GeForce FX5200 Ultra Review Page 1 of 5

INTRODUCTION

We all know that not everyone is open to the idea of spending over $500 on a new computer (let alone on a single component such as a video card). Let’s face it, to truly take advantage of a high-end graphics card, you’re going to need a high end system. Without the former, or the latter, you’re just hindering the better of the two.

And with that in mind, we take a look at nV News’ second review of a lower-end GeForce FX card, the Palit Daytona GeForce FX 5200 Ultra. Our first was Tim's review of the Soltek SL-5200-XD. The first question that comes to the mind of most is what separates the Ultra from the standard 5200. In the case of the 5200 class, the difference is 75MHz on the core. No doubt, Ultra provides better performance for a marginally higher price tag than its non-Ultra sibling.

Palit is a relatively little known manufacturer over here in North America, but they seem to be much more popular in the Asian marketplace. Palit’s lineup of NVIDIA-based graphics cards tend to focus on the low to middle-end segment, which tend to be the bread and butter of the market. As such, Palit who’s been around for the past 12 years provides exactly what this market is looking for, performance and stability at a low cost. The card I received arrived with only an S-Video cable and a Driver disk. A sparingly bare bundle, but as long as it keeps the price down, most consumers won’t mind.

 

Retail Packaging


The Included Gear

 

The card itself is built upon a purple PCB. A rather unique color that may look good in window-sporting cases, but I doubt you’ll be finding any other components that’ll match with it. The card sports an extremely reflective metallic active cooler emblazoned with an NVIDIA sticker. As required, the memory modules for the 5200 Ultra are of the BGA format. The BGA format occupies less surface area and allows for higher access speeds. Palit has also included an S-Video TV-out to take advantage on the on-chip TV-output capabilities while providing the consumer with a value-added feature. Another feature that has become fairly common and overlooked is the incorporation of both a DVI and VGA output connectors. Not only does this allow the user to not be required to purchase a new video card if they purchase a new monitor, but it also allows the user to take advantage of the nView multi-monitor capabilities of the card. Very cool.

 

Palit Daytona GeForce FX 5200 Ultra


Palit Daytona GeForce FX 5200 Ultra - Back

 

However, in their price-saving efforts, we see that the Palit Daytona GeForce FX 5200 Ultra doesn’t arrive with the extra Molex connector that some of the other GeForce FX 5200-based cards arrive with as well as having trimmed a few capacitors and other components off the PCB. We’ll be examining how this affects the stability of the card under normal circumstances and whether the missing Molex connector hinder the overclocking potential of the card.

 

Next Page: Test System Specifications and Unreal Tournament 2003

Last Updated on September 18, 2003


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