nV News Deals Shop Archive Search Files Forum Feed Articles IRC Chat GeForce.com


Search Site
Ads by Google
Links To NVIDIA
Drivers
Products
Communities
Support
NVIDIA Blog
News Room
About NVIDIA
GeForce Technology
CUDA
DirectX 11
Optimus
PhysX
SLI
3D Vision
3D Vision Surround
Articles
GeForce GTX 580
GeForce GTX 570
GeForce GTX 560 Ti
GeForce GTX 480
GeForce GTX 465
GeForce GTX 460
GeForce GTS 450
GeForce GTX 295
GeForce GTX 280
GeForce GTX 260
GeForce GT 240
GeForce 9800 GTX
GeForce 9800 GX2
GeForce 9600 GT
GeForce 8800 Ultra
GeForce 8800 GTX
GeForce 8800 GTS
GeForce 8800 GT
GeForce 8600 GTS
GeForce 8500 GT
GeForce 7950 GX2
GeForce 7950 GT
GeForce 7900 GTX
GeForce 7900 GS
GeForce 7800 GTX
Watercooling Project
My Book 500GB
Raptor Hard Drive
Guide To Doom 3
EVGA Stuff
EVGA E-LEET
EVGA Precision
GPU Voltage Tuner
OC Scanner
SLI Enhancement
EVGA Bot
EVGA Gear
Reviews and Awards
Associates
Benchmark Reviews
Fraps
GeForce Italia
GPU Review
Hardware Pacers
LaptopVideo2Go
MVKTECH
News3D (NVITALIA)
OutoftheBoxMods
OSNN.net
Overclocker Cafe
PC Extreme
PC Gaming Standards
PhysX Links & Info
TestSeek
3DChip (German)
8Dimensional
Soltek Qbic EQ3702M Mini Barebone System Review - Page 3 Of 7

ASSEMBLING THE SYSTEM

It took me the better part of a Sunday afternoon to assemble the system, although I was also taking pictures along the way. With all of the components installed, including an add-in graphics card, the system weighed around 12 pounds. The CPU, CD-ROM, and floppy drive were from an original nForce system that I have replaced with the Qbic. New components that I purchased include the memory and hard drive.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - System Components

Let's check out the cost of the system, which is based on prices at Newegg.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - System Costs
ComponentDescriptionPrice
CPUAMD Athlon XP 1800+, 1.53GHz, 166MHz FSB$51
MemoryKingston HyperX, 333MHz DDR, PC2700,
256MB - 2 Sticks
$108
GraphicsIntegrated GeForce4 MX (32MB BIOS Default)$0
Hard DriveWestern Digital 120GB, ATA100, 8MB Buffer, 7200RPM$74
CD-ROMSamsung 52X CD-ROM$19
Floppy DriveSamsung 1.44MB FDD$6
 Subtotal   $258
BareboneSoltek Qbic EQ3702M$265
 Total    $523
Optional:  
Graphics 1BFG or eVGA GeForce FX 5900 SE 128MB$188
Graphics 2BFG GeForce FX 5700 Ultra 128MB$199
Graphics 3Sapphire Radeon 9800 Pro 256MB$342

Note: The $265 price for Soltek's Qbic EQ3702M was based on NCIX.com's listed price of $344 CDN. A comparable mini barebone system from Shuttle, the SN412G, was selling for $290 at Newegg. I plan to follow up with Soltek in regards to the availability of the Qbic in the United States.

The Athlon XP 1800+ processor debuted over two years ago and runs at 1.53GHz and a 266MHz front size bus. The GeForce3 was NVIDIA's high-end graphics card back then and we were benchmarking IL-2 Sturmovik, Max Payne, MDK2, Quake 3, Serious Sam, and Unreal Tournament. Popular synthetic benchmarks included Aquamark, DroneZ, Evolva, and 3DMark2001.

To assemble the system, you'll need a Phillips head screwdriver to remove and secure the hard drive, floppy drive, and CD-ROM to the case rack. A flat head screwdriver will come in handy when attaching the heatsink/fan to the CPU.

The first step is to remove the front panel from the case, which is done by pressing a couple of plastic securing tabs located on either side of the case inward.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

The rack is removed from the case by removing the two screws located at the top of the case frame.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

The hard drive has been secured to the rack. The rear of the hard drive faces the right side of the case, where the I/O cable is located.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

I began removing the remaining faceplates from the rack.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

At this point, I have removed the faceplates from the rack.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

I secured the CD-ROM and the floppy drive to the rack. Note that if the CD-ROM is secured to the rack at this point, the rack will not fit back into the case. You will want to secure the CD-ROM to the rack after the rack is placed back inside the case.

Soltek QBIC EQ3702M - Assemble System

Let's leave the rack alone for now and turn our attention to the CPU. Installing the CPU was straightforward, but attaching the heatsink/fan to the CPU socket was a daunting experience that requires patience. Once you figure out how the heatsink/fan fits, you will use the flathead screwdriver to apply pressure on the heatsink/fan clamp to latch it on to the lug on the CPU socket. An example is shown in HardwareZone's review of the EQ3701M. It is possible to damage the processor should the screwdriver slip during this maneuver!

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

Whew. Time to take a break!

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

Adding the memory was a snap.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

Now we are ready to put the rack back inside the case. But if you look at the picture below closely, you will see that the rack is not going to fit. The problem is that the floppy drive cable is hanging over the memory sticks.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

The solution to our dilemma? Lay the floppy drive cable down by the side of the memory. With that quarter of an inch of space reclaimed, the rack will fit perfectly.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

The rack is in place and the CD-ROM can be installed now. After that's done, you can hook up the drive cables and power supply leads. The black strips of mylar insulation provide a barrier in the event that an add-in AGP or PCI card makes contract with the case.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

One minor adjustment was necessary as the plastic tab I mentioned earlier is not making contact with the CD-ROM's tray eject button.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Assemble System

I moved the CD-ROM forward about three quarters of an inch by using the alternate mounts on the rack.

I connected the monitor, mouse, keyboard, speakers, and Ethernet cable to the system, turned on the power, and the system booted successfully.

Soltek Qbic EQ3702M - Advanced BIOS Features

I rebooted and changed the BIOS device boot order sequence to use the CD-ROM first, which contained the Windows XP installation CD. I partioned the hard drive into two logical drives, installed Windows XP, Service Pack 1, NVIDIA Forceware drivers, and finally Norton Ghost, which was used to save a copy of the boot partition.

Next Page: DirectX Integrated Graphics Image Quality and Performance

Last Updated on January 5, 2004


Table of Contents

Advertisement

nV News - Copyright © 1998-2014.
Search Products
Search
for


Ads by Casale
Tweaks
Metro: Last Light
PlanetSide 2
Miscellaneous Links
AutoDesk 123 Design
Build Your Gaming PC
FPS vs. Frame Time
Free Games And MMOs
GeForce SLI Technology
HPC For Dummies
PC Game Release Dates
Play Classic PC Games
Steam Hardware Survey
Video Game Designers
TechTerms Dictionary
GPU Applications
AMD GPU Clock Tool
AMD System Monitor
ATITool
aTuner
EVGA E-LEET
EVGA OC Scanner
EVGA Precision
EVGA Voltage Tuner
Gainward ExperTool
GPU-Shark
GPU Voltage Tuner
Fraps
FurMark
GLview
GPU Caps Viewer
GPU PerfStudio
GPU Shark
GPU-Z
MSI Afterburner
nHancer
NiBiTor
NVClock (Linux)
NVFlash
NVIDIA Inspector
NvTempLogger
NVTray
PowerStrip
RivaTuner
SLI Profile Tool
The Compressonator
3DCenter Filter Test
3DMark 11
3DMark Vantage
PhysX Applications
Cell Factor Revolution
Cryostatis Tech Demo
Cube Wall Demo
PhysX FluidMark
Fluid Physics
NV PhysX Tweaker
NVIDIA OPTIX 2
PhysX Downloads
PhysX at YouTube
Add-In Partners
AFOX
ASUS
AXLE
BFG Technologies
BIOSTAR
Chaintech
Colorful
ELSA
emTek
EVGA
GAINWARD
GALAXY
GIGABYTE
FORSA
FOXCONN
Inno3D
Jaton
Leadtek
Manli
MSI
Palit
PNY
Point of View
Prolink
SPARKLE
XFX
ZOGIS
ZOTAC