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Water Cooling with PolarFLO Article - Page 5 of 8

INSTALLATION CONTINUED

Mounting The Water Blocks

PolarFLO provides adequate instructions and really there isn't much to installing the water blocks. Installing them is much easier than mounting a gigantic heat sink for air cooling. If you want to see the installation instructions you can view the PDF documents for the VGA water block and CPU water block at the PolarFLO website.

I did run into a bit of an issue when installing the VGA water block though. The bolts that PolarFLO provided were just barely too large to fit into the mounting holes on my 6800 Ultra. This was easily fixed by slowly and carefully boring out the 6800 mounting holes just a bit.

Drill Bits and 6800 Ultras


Installation Photos

Below are some photos from various angles of the final installation. Some tubing was changed out later but this is what I essentially ended up with.

Just About Done

Another View Before Leak Testing Begins

You'll notice a vertical length of tubing on the right side of the photos above. This is what is called a T-Line and it's purpose is threefold. To allow you to fill and drain the circuit. It's third purpose is to allow for air bubbles to bleed out while you initially prime the pump, fill the system, and top it off as needed over time. Another approach is to use a reservoir instead of a T-Line. I opted for a T-line as it makes for easier removal and costs less than a reservoir.

Filling and the Mix

The photos below illustrate the filling process. From priming the pump (letting fluid flow down into the pump) to a circuit basically free of any air bubbles.

A quick word on the mix I used... As I stated before, I used a 15% mix of the Prestone antifreeze to 85% distilled water. This broke down to about 2.4 US tablespoons per 1 cup of distilled water. Once full, there was a total of about 14 fluid ounces in my circuit. I also added just one drop of algaecide. The particular kind I had suggested 14 drops of the stuff per 50 gallons of water. So, a single drop was more than enough for my use.

Priming The Pump

Air Bubbles Must Die

Mmm...Frothy

Tons Of Air In The Circuit

Clearer Now That Air Has Bled Out

A little tip...the "frothiness" can be eliminated by waiting to add your additive to the water after the air has bled out. It's not really a big deal but it can speed up the filling/bleeding process by an hour or more. Besides, watching the air bleed out of the T-line is kind of mesmerizing.

More Installation Photos

Another View of the CPU Water Block

Another View of the VGA Water Block

Something really worth noting in the photo above is that I found the softer tubing (Tygon® R-1000 in this case) necessary to make this tight turn from the CPU to the video card. However, it was only possible by using the CoolSleeves. Otherwise, the tubing would kink badly. Stiffer tubing would have required too large of a curve (would have extended outside the side of the case).

CoolSleeves are a real lifesaver that allow you many more options in how you route your tubing.

Next Page: Benchmarks: Default Clocks

Last Updated on May 3, 2005


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