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Hoopla
11-19-07, 10:02 AM
What is the most important GPU spec to run games at 1920x1200 (my monitor's native resolution). Memory? Shaders? Etc. Playing at anything lower than that resolution sucks on my LCD because things get blurry.

I want to figure it out before I buy the next card. Thanks! :cool:

LycosV
11-19-07, 01:03 PM
There really isn't one specific component that makes a good card great. The best way to find one that can run at the resolution you want is to check out benchmarks for the games you play and pick one from there.

3DBrad
11-19-07, 02:15 PM
Vram (and its bandwidth) is about the most important, as well as fillrate. :)

stncttr908
11-19-07, 03:41 PM
VRAM is very important, especially with AA applied at that resolution. Fillrate as well.

SlieTheSecond
11-19-07, 11:46 PM
Not to hi-jack here but my question relates and sure it will help the op too.

I always new more vram helped with higher res and aa. But why exactly?

Why exactly does more memory help with AA? All it is doing is making edges smooth. You would think that would take more gpu power, not load more into memory.

And the res part. Higher textures maybe? But if all textures are set to high to begin with, then larger textures will not be loaded. Unless they get scaled upwards?

3DBrad
11-20-07, 12:00 AM
Vram is used by anti-aliasing, tripple buffering, textures, etc. Basically, the core of the GPU can access the onboard RAM a lot faster than system RAM, however, DirectX 10 features virtual texturing, so that the GPU can use system RAM more effectively. :)

Vram is just like system RAM, it just stores graphics-related things. :)

Mr. Nice
11-20-07, 03:16 AM
Why exactly does more memory help with AA? All it is doing is making edges smooth. You would think that would take more gpu power, not load more into memory.Because in the back buffer the colour info (& z-buffer) needs to be stored for each sample. In theory this means that 4x antialiasing quadruples the buffer size. Actually, since for "interior" pixels all four samples are the same colour, modern cards use lossless compression trickery to make it not quite that bad, but it's still bigger. That's one the reasons why "coverage" antialiasing is quicker (for the same sample count) then simple multi-sampling, since the extra coverage samples don't have their own color info (not sure about own z-buffer entry).
The extra memory & memory bandwidth usage is also entirely responsible for the speed difference between 2x and 4x on 8 series. A single ROP can perform 4 multi-samples per clock tick just as easily as 2 multi-samples, and why in some games the 2x is "free", that indicates that that game isn't video memory-bandwidth bound (or possibly CPU bound).