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View Full Version : How to Fix Loud Rattling in PSU Fan


Vegetable
12-28-07, 07:06 PM
I have a SilverStone 600W ST60F modular PSU that's only about 3 months old. For the past week, its fan has been making a loud rattling noise. (I'm 95% certain the PSU is the culprit. It's possible it's the CPU fan. I know it's not the case fan because I've already replaced that to try to fix this problem and the noise is as bad as ever). The blades appear to be striking the circular metal shield. Should I loosen the screws to attempt to lower the shield and separate it from the fan blades? Or is this a bad idea on the theory that One Should Not Mess With a PSU? It seems awfully early for the high-end PSU to be failing, and I'd hate to replace it if the problem is easily fixable.

Zapablast05
12-28-07, 07:13 PM
Do what you can with the PSU. The concept of "Don't mess with the PSU" means don't open it.

breathemetal
12-28-07, 07:43 PM
Open psu...and then you'll go BOOM!

Well, maybe not boom, but...you could fry yourself pretty good.

lduguay
12-28-07, 10:08 PM
Should I loosen the screws to attempt to lower the shield and separate it from the fan blades?
Captain Picard says, do not mess with the shields:p

CaptNKILL
12-28-07, 10:39 PM
I've taken several power supplies apart (mostly to harvest fans out of dead units) but only after they had been unplugged for weeks or months.

I know of a few different ways to "discharge" a power supply, and I don't know if they make it any less dangerous, but if you really need to fix something in your PSU just look it up online somewhere. I'm sure there are precautions that can be taken. It's like repairing TVs. People make it out to be instant death, yet there have been TV repair men since the things existed.

I definitely do not advise popping the thing open an hour (or even a day) after unplugging it and then digging around in there with your fingers and a screw driver, but if you do some homework and learn how to discharge the unit to make it safe, by all means... save yourself $100 and replace your PSU fan rather than scrapping the whole unit.

That said, if its only 3 months old, contact silverstone for an RMA. It'd be less hassle and the shipping would probably cost you less than a new fan.

Zapablast05
12-29-07, 12:02 AM
I've taken several power supplies apart (mostly to harvest fans out of dead units) but only after they had been unplugged for weeks or months.

I know of a few different ways to "discharge" a power supply, and I don't know if they make it any less dangerous, but if you really need to fix something in your PSU just look it up online somewhere. I'm sure there are precautions that can be taken. It's like repairing TVs. People make it out to be instant death, yet there have been TV repair men since the things existed.

I definitely do not advise popping the thing open an hour (or even a day) after unplugging it and then digging around in there with your fingers and a screw driver, but if you do some homework and learn how to discharge the unit to make it safe, by all means... save yourself $100 and replace your PSU fan rather than scrapping the whole unit.

That said, if its only 3 months old, contact silverstone for an RMA. It'd be less hassle and the shipping would probably cost you less than a new fan.

Oh yeah, try the RMA. I gave CaptNKILL the idea to say that. You could never go wrong with an RMA, unless they lose your package! :D

jcrox
12-29-07, 12:12 AM
(throwpc)

jeffmd
12-29-07, 02:01 AM
btw didn't the issue of large capacitors that could store power after its been unplugged go away with switching power supplies?

Zapablast05
12-29-07, 09:28 PM
Caps always discharge at any given moment


just like crainger.

jeffmd
12-29-07, 11:14 PM
I ment didn't switching power supplies remove most of the large capacitors that will wtfpwn you?

EciDemon
01-07-08, 07:11 AM
Brothers puter sounded like something trying to take off into space, while listening around in the case it sounded as if it came from the psu.

So i changed the fan to a simalar one from and old psu, boot it all up and it still sounds as bad, it turned out to be the small chipset fan >_>
A tiny drop of oil under the sticker was all it required. *dunno where to buy new chipset fans around here*

Anyways, Id say if your going to open the psu, use common sense. Dont touch anything exposed, You void the warranty when you open it up, keep that in mind.