PDA

View Full Version : VGA to RCA composite?


kingme02
02-03-08, 07:07 AM
I have an evga 8800 gts 320 and have recently used the s-video cord and hooked it up to my tv. The quality is worse than the pc monitor. You can barely see text. I want to know if a VGA to RCA composite cable will work for me? I don't have an hdtv.

Madpistol
02-03-08, 09:39 AM
here's how it works:

HDMI > component RGB > S-video > composite RCA > cable

If what your asking is true, the composite connection is even lower than s-video. The only way you're going to get any better is to get a component connection. But since you don't have an HDTV, I'm not sure it's going to do any good. :(

kingme02
02-03-08, 10:44 AM
oh ok, the svideo is ok i guess, for watching movies.

shabby
02-03-08, 11:40 AM
Give component a try if your tv accepts it.

Athena
02-04-08, 11:12 AM
coax cable should have better picture quality than composite as it carries more data for the video signal.

Madpistol
02-04-08, 10:14 PM
coax cable should have better picture quality than composite as it carries more data for the video signal.

I have to disagree. Composite divides the signals into video, left audio, and right audio. A coax cable has all those going through the same line. Therefore, composite is the clearer signal.

ViN86
02-04-08, 10:37 PM
lower your resolution.

then you will be able to read the fonts. otherwise, you will need an HDTV.

darkrider01
02-04-08, 11:32 PM
I have to disagree. Composite divides the signals into video, left audio, and right audio. A coax cable has all those going through the same line. Therefore, composite is the clearer signal.

Actually, Athena is right. Coax cable is capable of carrying a better quality signal than Composite. Coax has the the ability to carry far more data than Composite. Coax is the media that brings internet, phone, and HDTV into my home - all through one single RG6 cable.

In the OP's case, for a non-HDTV, S-Video should provide the best picture if component (Y,Pb,Pr) is not available.

Madpistol
02-05-08, 07:44 AM
Actually, Athena is right. Coax cable is capable of carrying a better quality signal than Composite. Coax has the the ability to carry far more data than Composite. Coax is the media that brings internet, phone, and HDTV into my home - all through one single RG6 cable.

Very good point. I never thought about all of those things.

I stand corrected.

Tr1cK
02-05-08, 07:54 AM
Good luck finding a video card with coax out. lol

I had an old 27" floor model (died New Years Eve) that had no composite or s-video inputs. I used a composite to coax converter and the composite out on my Voodoo 3. I had to download a custom resolution changer to force it down to 640x480 to make things even remotely legible. It really sucks, but it was mainly for just playing video and such over the network, which it did very well. I think the TVs lower resolution was actually a plus for video playback because there was less artifacting due to upscaling.

jeffmd
02-05-08, 12:21 PM
coax is NOT a video connection! Its a cable type that is commonly used to carry an RF signal. Your cable, internet, phone, what ever are all transmitted by RF and require a demodulator to convert the signal back. The cable may be fine but the conversion process can take its toll on the quality. HD signals of course are kept digitally and does not degrade to weakness in the RF signal along the cable.

This Isnt really an issue of cable type though, king, I hope you arnt thinking your TV will in any way be a good substitute for a monitor. Your TV has an effective resolution of 680x480, and its interlaced. Windows and text will need to be large, and youll get shimmering as well as the edges are likely to be cut off due to TV overscan.

DVD or less quality movies are fine for outputting to TV cause the resolution is not much larger then the TV's.

Burnt_Ram
02-05-08, 03:10 PM
interesting discussion. *takes a seat*

kingme02
02-06-08, 11:26 AM
Ya its fine. I wanted to use it to play games but I guess the monitor will do. I do watch movies with the tv and its perfect for that.

jeffmd
02-06-08, 12:31 PM
Games very, some allow you to scale the UI (or are allready scaled big enough) to be readable on a tv at 640x480. Otherwise you will probably have text readability issues. However if you have your heart set on big screen gaming, save up for a nice 30 inch HD tv, 1280x720 resolution (1080p would not only be expensive, but require a monster pc to drive at that resolution). Alot of gamers (I plan to when I get the cash) have been using an HD tv to game on cause its cheaper then a large screen monitor, and 720p is an easy resolution to play most games fast in, and you can AA and AF the hell out of most games to smooth out pixle issues.