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View Full Version : Why not overclock future PS3's/360's?


christos
05-03-08, 08:19 AM
As Microsoft and Sony continually shrink the chips in their consoles, I had a thought which seems logical enough to me.

Why not save tons of money on next-next generation R&D by extending the life on the current generation of consoles for a few more years. Would there be any technical reason why new versions of the current consoles couldn't contain overclocked CPU's/GPU's/SPU's? A firmare and/or software update could be used in conjuction with the overclocked hardware if necessary.

Existing consoles would continue to run all current and future games, while the newer edition consoles would simply run the same games smoother. Game designers would be mandated to ensure games ran at a playable framerate on all versions, not just the fastest versions of the console.

I for one would gladly purchase a revised PS3/360 down the road if it meant rock steady 30 or 60fps in all the current games.



I know this would cause discontent for some current owners, which is why I would think they couldn't do this for another year or so. Kinda like a PS3.1 or Xbox 365.

(please no comments on the wii being an overclocked gamecube)

ViN86
05-03-08, 08:35 AM
if you mean increase clock speed in the CPU/GPU then i agreee, why not. but OC'ing probably isnt a good idea. hell, the 360 is barely stable as it is :lol:

christos
05-03-08, 09:00 AM
I figured since future versions would be 45nm, heat/stability would no longer be an issue and overclocking could be safely acheived. But yes, increasing clock speeds would also be an viable option.

MustangSVT
05-03-08, 10:53 AM
Which games don't run smooth enough as it is for you? I'm just curious.

The only game I can think of at the moment that I wouldn't mind to run a bit better is Mass Effect.

christos
05-03-08, 11:05 AM
Which games don't run smooth enough as it is for you? I'm just curious.

The only game I can think of at the moment that I wouldn't mind to run a bit better is Mass Effect.


Rare is the game that runs a solid 60fps on either console, most run 30fps, and out of those, some have some minor vsync issues.

There are many examples on both consoles, but I'd rather not start listing individual games and turn this into another my console is better than yours thread.

3 mutliplatform quickies off the top of my head:
stranglehold
the darkness
gta iv

|MaguS|
05-03-08, 12:03 PM
Sony did such a thing with the PSP but the CPU in it was underclocked originally. If they did the same thing with the CELL then it could happen but only if all versions of the console support it. Only making newer 45mm consoles capable of it would be hell on developers.

christos
05-03-08, 12:43 PM
Sony did such a thing with the PSP but the CPU in it was underclocked originally. If they did the same thing with the CELL then it could happen but only if all versions of the console support it. Only making newer 45mm consoles capable of it would be hell on developers.


Not quite sure I understand why it would affect devs at all. If in 2 years from now, they increase the clock speed of the video card (and/or cpu) for new PS3's only (let's call it PS3.1), as long as devs develop for the lowest common denominator (PS3), wouldn't the games simply run better on the new revision of the console?

I've had custom firmware on my psp for years now, which had the ability to unlock the clockspeed and use 333 mhz before Sony opened it up. It simply made things run better...no compatibility issues, no dev issues.

Eliminator
05-03-08, 12:47 PM
i think consoles work different... games might actually overspeed if the cpu is too fast... i remember you can put a 1.4ghz celeron in an xbox replacing the original p3-733 but then games would overspeed

|MaguS|
05-03-08, 01:45 PM
There is no performance gain with dynamic hardware performance changes in a console unless the game is specifically coded for it. Problem with your idea is that developers would have to code for different specs completly voiding the best feature of a console, a closed and specific enviroment.

Like I first stated theres no performance gain unless coded specifically for the hardware. Look at the PSP for example, older titles see no performance changes from the new CPU speed. People modded the original Xbox with more ram to run linux on the system but when playing games it wouldn't improve at all.

christos
05-03-08, 01:49 PM
There is no performance gain with dynamic hardware performance changes in a console unless the game is specifically coded for it. Problem with your idea is that developers would have to code for different specs completly voiding the best feature of a console, a closed and specific enviroment.

Like I first stated theres no performance gain unless coded specifically for the hardware. Look at the PSP for example, older titles see no performance changes from the new CPU speed. People modded the original Xbox with more ram to run linux on the system but when playing games it wouldn't improve at all.

Makes sense for cpu/ram. Does the above apply if the GPU were overclocked also? If a game were programmed to be locked in at 30 or 60fps, would a gpu overclock help to prevent dips in framerate, or does the above logic apply here as well?

|MaguS|
05-03-08, 01:59 PM
Makes sense for cpu/ram. Does the above apply if the GPU were overclocked also? If a game were programmed to be locked in at 30 or 60fps, would a gpu overclock help to prevent dips in framerate, or does the above logic apply here as well?
It applies aswell. The slow downs in games are coded within the game due to limitations with the console or a problem within the engine. It's not like PC Games that would be resolved with more power.

Take this as an example, if there was a custscene that had slow down in it, it would still show that slow down even if the console had double the power. Another example would be RVS slow down during streaming scene's, you experianced these performance drops even on the PC with the latest hardware. When they compiled and finalized the game, the performance drops were known for that given scene or experiance.

Only time when these performance problems are unexpected is when its a glitch that wasn't known at the time of going gold. Those issues can be fixed with patches, It's rumored that alot of the slow down in GTA for the PS3 is caused by improper caching to the HD. A game could also exibit performance problems if the console began to overheat for example.

ViN86
05-03-08, 02:38 PM
Sony did such a thing with the PSP but the CPU in it was underclocked originally. If they did the same thing with the CELL then it could happen but only if all versions of the console support it. Only making newer 45mm consoles capable of it would be hell on developers.
well the system is already hell for devs lol

Ninja Prime
05-03-08, 04:25 PM
As Microsoft and Sony continually shrink the chips in their consoles, I had a thought which seems logical enough to me.

Why not save tons of money on next-next generation R&D by extending the life on the current generation of consoles for a few more years. Would there be any technical reason why new versions of the current consoles couldn't contain overclocked CPU's/GPU's/SPU's? A firmare and/or software update could be used in conjuction with the overclocked hardware if necessary.

Existing consoles would continue to run all current and future games, while the newer edition consoles would simply run the same games smoother. Game designers would be mandated to ensure games ran at a playable framerate on all versions, not just the fastest versions of the console.

I for one would gladly purchase a revised PS3/360 down the road if it meant rock steady 30 or 60fps in all the current games.



I know this would cause discontent for some current owners, which is why I would think they couldn't do this for another year or so. Kinda like a PS3.1 or Xbox 365.

(please no comments on the wii being an overclocked gamecube)

The problem is a console is supposed to be a closed system for developers, so changing the spec, even just clock rates, could have some unknown effect or instability on older games. Subsequently it will likely never be done... by the hardware vendor, anyway. It seems to me there was some third party companies selling overclocked X-box's years ago, and I heard something about overlocked N64's back in the day.

Ps: Wii is an overclocked Gamecube.

six_storm
05-03-08, 08:31 PM
The 360 or PS3 won't run every game at 1080p and 60FPS+. And yeah, if the 360 was OC'd, it would blow up even faster than they already do. Trust me, I'm on my 3rd 360. Third time is a charm!

kev13dd
05-03-08, 08:36 PM
#1 problem and reason it won't happen: future games, older consoles

You're proposing overclocking the new ones because they can handle it- old ones can't. Once you start overclocking the new ones, and developing new games for them, you're going to start getting laggier games on old consoles

The #1 benefit from consoles vs computer is clear cut specs. We might currently have about 12 different console variations for each, but besides HD and color, the specs remain exactly the same, and always will (core size doesn't count as a spec since those cores are still being run at the same exact speeds. No speed benefit whatsoever when set at the same speeds)

K