PDA

View Full Version : I want a new PSU. Suggestions?


ViN86
08-11-08, 06:31 PM
well, my current 550W Antec is ok, but tbh, i want to get something with a little more future-proofing.

i would like a PSU with at least 750W. please recommend me a good power supply. i would like as few 12V rails as possible (1 being the minimum obviously) and the power supply needs to have EPS12V (8-pin CPU connector).

price and reliability will be taken into account. thx :D

npras42
08-11-08, 06:39 PM
Corsair TX750W?

Meant to be pretty good and Corsair considered reliable PSU brand nowadays.

ViN86
08-11-08, 06:46 PM
newegg has it for $99.99 w/ MIR and free shipping :drooling:

looks like this is it.

anyone else have any suggestions? if not i will probably be ordering this heh.

Feyy
08-11-08, 07:26 PM
Order that, can't go wrong :)

Ghosthunter
08-11-08, 07:56 PM
I got that one in my new build about a month ago and it been rock stable so far

Tr1cK
08-11-08, 08:01 PM
My Thermaltake 700 has been great. My old Enermax 465 is still kicking as well.

mullet
08-11-08, 11:37 PM
PC Power & Cooling S75QB 750W (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703009)

This is the one to buy dude, single rail FTW!!!

Rummy
08-11-08, 11:40 PM
Pc Power & Cooling 750 quad

Stoneyguy
08-12-08, 06:45 AM
Newegg has the PCP&C 750 for 99 dollars after rebate. (http://slickdeals.net/?sduid=332670&sdtid=893859&sdfid=9&u2=http://promotions.newegg.com/NEemail/Aug-0-2008/Promo081208in/index-landing.html?nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL081208&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL081208-_-email-_-E0F-_-HAP)

AngelGraves13
08-12-08, 03:04 PM
Antec TruePower Quattro 1000W Power Supply (http://www.amazon.com/Antec-TPQ-1000-TruePower-Quattro-Supply/dp/B000QW9DS2/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1218571402&sr=8-1) $200 + FREE Super Saver Shipping at Amazon.com

More information at Antec.com (http://www.antec.com/us/productDetails.php?ProdID=27100)

Features:
* NVIDIA™ SLI™-ready certified
* 80PLUS® Certified
* Universal Input, automatically adjusts for 100V to 240V power grids
* Active Power Factor Correction (PFC) helps reduce electrical waste
* Supports EPS12V v2.91 and ATX12V systems
* Four 12V output circuits provide supreme system stability
* Accurate power rating allows TruePower Quattro to deliver its full rated power (24 hours a day rated at 50ºC)
* Up to 85% efficient
* 80mm low noise cooling fan
* Heavy duty protection circuitry prevents damage resulting from short circuits (SCP), over voltages (OVP), under voltages (UVP), and over current (OCP)
* 2 x 8-pin PCI-E connectors and 2 x 6-pin connectors for PCI-Express graphics cards
* MTBF: 100,000 hours
* Safety approvals: UL, CUL, FCC, TÜV, CE, C-tick, CCC, CB
* Gold plated connectors for superior conductivity
* AQ5 -Antec Quality five-year parts and labor warranty
* Dimensions:
• 3.4"(H) x 5.9"(W) x 7.1"(D)
• 8.6cm(H) x 15cm(W) x 18cm(D)
* Package dimensions:
• 9.4"(H) x 11.6"(W) x 5.4"(D)
• 23.88cm(H) x 29.46cm(W) x 13.72cm(D)
* Weight:
• Net: 5.75 lbs / 2.6 kg
• Gross: 8.4 lbs / 3.81 kg

The Tech Report Review (http://techreport.com/articles.x/14064/5) - Editor's Choice!

I'm actually going to get this baby for myself if my bank account doesn't have a hole in it next week.

bacon12
08-12-08, 03:07 PM
Corsair TX750W?

Meant to be pretty good and Corsair considered reliable PSU brand nowadays.

Got one a few weeks ago, very nice.

methimpikehoses
08-12-08, 03:35 PM
Get that PC Power and Cooling Silencer 750 that is mentioned above. :thumbsup:

CaptNKILL
08-12-08, 03:35 PM
Antec TruePower Quattro 1000W Power Supply (http://www.amazon.com/Antec-TPQ-1000-TruePower-Quattro-Supply/dp/B000QW9DS2/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1218571402&sr=8-1) $200 + FREE Super Saver Shipping at Amazon.com

More information at Antec.com (http://www.antec.com/us/productDetails.php?ProdID=27100)

Features:
* NVIDIA™ SLI™-ready certified
* 80PLUS® Certified
* Universal Input, automatically adjusts for 100V to 240V power grids
* Active Power Factor Correction (PFC) helps reduce electrical waste
* Supports EPS12V v2.91 and ATX12V systems
* Four 12V output circuits provide supreme system stability
* Accurate power rating allows TruePower Quattro to deliver its full rated power (24 hours a day rated at 50ºC)
* Up to 85% efficient
* 80mm low noise cooling fan
* Heavy duty protection circuitry prevents damage resulting from short circuits (SCP), over voltages (OVP), under voltages (UVP), and over current (OCP)
* 2 x 8-pin PCI-E connectors and 2 x 6-pin connectors for PCI-Express graphics cards
* MTBF: 100,000 hours
* Safety approvals: UL, CUL, FCC, TÜV, CE, C-tick, CCC, CB
* Gold plated connectors for superior conductivity
* AQ5 -Antec Quality five-year parts and labor warranty
* Dimensions:
• 3.4"(H) x 5.9"(W) x 7.1"(D)
• 8.6cm(H) x 15cm(W) x 18cm(D)
* Package dimensions:
• 9.4"(H) x 11.6"(W) x 5.4"(D)
• 23.88cm(H) x 29.46cm(W) x 13.72cm(D)
* Weight:
• Net: 5.75 lbs / 2.6 kg
• Gross: 8.4 lbs / 3.81 kg

The Tech Report Review (http://techreport.com/articles.x/14064/5) - Editor's Choice!

I'm actually going to get this baby for myself if my bank account doesn't have a hole in it next week.

All that and no listing of the amps per rail? :bleh:

IMO, if you're going to spend $200 on a PSU, you should get a single rail anyway.

I like this one...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817256043

SH64
08-14-08, 05:25 AM
Thermaltake 850W (with modular cables)

Revs
08-14-08, 05:29 AM
Are there any disadvantages to a single rail PSU? My Galaxy has 5 rails and I've never had any trouble with it. Just wondering. :)

qube
08-14-08, 05:43 AM
Thermaltake 1200 or 1000 they are great

Feyy
08-14-08, 05:44 AM
With all the hype about multiple 12-volt rails (ads claim that two rails is better than one, five is better than four, etc.), you'd think it was a better design. Unfortunately, it's not!

Here are the facts: A large, single 12-volt rail (without a 240VA limit) can transfer 100% of the 12-volt output from the PSU to the computer, while a multi-rail 12-volt design has distribution losses of up to 30% of the power supply's rating. Those losses occur because power literally gets "trapped" on under-utilized rails. For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.

Since the maximum current from any one 12-volt rail of a multiple-rail PSU is limited to 20 amps (240VA / 12 volts = 20 amps), PCs with high-performance components that draw over 20 amps from the same rail are subject to over-current shutdowns. With power requirements for multiple processors and graphics cards continuing to grow, the multiple-rail design, with its 240VA limit per rail, is basically obsolete.

Revs
08-14-08, 06:03 AM
Cheers Feyy :)

Isn't a multi-rail PSU more voltage stable?

mullet
08-14-08, 09:11 AM
With all the hype about multiple 12-volt rails (ads claim that two rails is better than one, five is better than four, etc.), you'd think it was a better design. Unfortunately, it's not!

Here are the facts: A large, single 12-volt rail (without a 240VA limit) can transfer 100% of the 12-volt output from the PSU to the computer, while a multi-rail 12-volt design has distribution losses of up to 30% of the power supply's rating. Those losses occur because power literally gets "trapped" on under-utilized rails. For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.

Since the maximum current from any one 12-volt rail of a multiple-rail PSU is limited to 20 amps (240VA / 12 volts = 20 amps), PCs with high-performance components that draw over 20 amps from the same rail are subject to over-current shutdowns. With power requirements for multiple processors and graphics cards continuing to grow, the multiple-rail design, with its 240VA limit per rail, is basically obsolete.

QFT, great post.

Joe Public
08-14-08, 01:37 PM
That's PCP&C marketing speak, I suggest you read Jonnygurus views and consider those statements again. He knows what he's talking about, having been involved in PSU design himself.

http://jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3990