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View Full Version : Here we go again, Raytracing!


MaxFX
03-12-09, 07:47 AM
http://i.gizmodo.com/5167120/ex+apple-engineers-caustic-startup-promises-200x-faster-ray+tracing-graphics-by-2010-suck-it-crysis

Sounds good on paper doesent it. bla bla we shall see!

Homepage!
http://www.caustic.com/

Quote!

Right now, Caustic says they have a hardware and software setup that can zoomify ray-tracing 20x over today's hardware, and that by 2010, they'll have goods that'll do it 200x faster. Sadly, they're not moving into the gaming space first, instead focusing on architects and animators, meaning we'll have to wait for like Crysis 4 to see if Caustic can... well, you know the rest.

Badboy_12345
03-12-09, 08:48 AM
oh look flying pigs! :p

They can show us or STFU!

Soetdjuret
03-12-09, 10:30 AM
Agreed.. this BS doesn't make sense since there's no power to it yet. And i doubt there will be in 2010.. That's just 2 years from now. nVidia has moved slow in the GPU process the last couple years.

TheANIMAL
03-12-09, 10:55 AM
Actually, not only is this possible, but its also unextraordinary. This isn't even for realtime raytracing anyways. Over the last 5 years raytracing in renderers such as VRay have got about 10x faster anyways.

The only company who has said they can do real time raytracing is intel. They apparently got it working in quakewars at 1280*1024 resolution.

MaxFX
03-12-09, 11:35 AM
I doubt it to, a NEW company will do what nVidia cant who live and bread GPU's for many many years no way!
Intel will fail to and they now it by now as lately it aint much talk about the 8 wonder of the world Larrabee for raytracing, now they just talk about what good it will be for rasterization.

And nVidia keeps smiling as Intel will open their box of worms :D

Rasterization and Raytracing hybrid renderer that whats it will be. Carmac and the other who knows says that over and over so fuc. this and lallabee!

ViN86
03-12-09, 12:02 PM
you guys obviously havent been browsing the forums enough.

http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=129874

SAN FRANCISCO - March 10, 2009 - Caustic Graphics®, a new 3D computer graphics company, launches today with a fundamental breakthrough in raytracing acceleration that is set to define a new era in professional 3D production and interactive consumer graphics. Raytracing, the gold-standard for creating 3D imagery, duplicates the natural physics of light, creating stunning images by meticulously tracing the path of light to and throughout any given scene.

Caustic's first-generation technology will deliver an average 20X increase in the speed used to create stunning, realistic 3D imagery for film and video, game development, as well as automotive and consumer product design. The second generation of Caustic's technology, due early next year, is expected to gain an additional order of magnitude in performance, offering 200X speed over today's state-of-the-art graphics products. This massive speed jump is due to Caustic's patent-pending raytracing algorithms implemented in a semiconductor design.

The computational complexity of producing cinema-quality, raytraced 3D images involves large, downstream costs, including slow "black box" design iterations and costly "render farm" server infrastructures. These costs are symptoms of a problem with today's computer designs where CPUs and GPUs are efficient at accelerating the rasterized graphics in video games but woefully inefficient at accelerating cinema-quality raytraced graphics. Caustic's forthcoming standards-based CausticRT™ platform enables highly parallel CPUs and GPUs to massively-accelerate raytracing, putting it on par with rasterization and resulting in cinema-quality 3D delivered interactively on low-cost PCs.

"Real-time raytracing has been the holy grail of computer graphics since 1979 - a dream always on the horizon but never within reach," said Dr. Jon Peddie, of Jon Peddie Research, the computer graphics market research firm in Tiburon, CA. "Demos have been done with 16 or more processors, super computers, and other esoteric devices, but never anything that was within reach of a PC budget. Caustic Graphics has made the breakthrough with a combination of a small hardware accelerator and some very innovative software to be able to deliver real-time, complex, high-resolution raytraced images - this is an amazing accomplishment." The Caustic management team is made up of technical visionaries and graphics experts from Autodesk, Apple, ATI, Intel and NVIDIA. Before starting Caustic, company founders James McCombe, Luke Peterson and Ryan Salsbury worked together at Apple, where McCombe was a lead architect for the company's OpenGL Graphics system and Chief Architect of Apple's rendering algorithms for the iPhone and iPod.

"For years, 3D professionals in multiple industries have labored under the yoke of slow iterations and unwieldy offline render farms," said Caustic Graphics CEO, Ken Daniels. "Caustic puts the power of a render farm, operating at interactive speeds, on every desktop, enabling designers and animators to get from concept to product faster, better and at lower cost." The Caustic product offering will be announced in April 2009.

About Caustic Graphics
Caustic Graphics, creators of CausticRT, is reinventing raytracing and changing how interactive cinema-quality 3D graphics are produced, used, and enjoyed. The company, headquartered in San Francisco, is currently funded by angel investors. For more information, please visit www.caustic.com.

this is very possible. the difference between these guys and Nvidia is that nvidia has it's own set of algorithms used for ray tracing, while these guys have their own proprietary algorithms that they have actually implemented into instruction sets. so, they are taking software rendering, and trying to make it hardware rendering. they expect a 2000x increase in render time in 2 years.

anyone will tell you that hardware rendering is much faster than software rendering. besides, they mention gaming, but i think this is more aimed at digital animation (ie Dreamworks). it will still probably be very slow in games.

jeffmd
03-12-09, 12:12 PM
raytracing has been thrown up as a possible replacement for todays current rendering methods in games for a little while now. As promising as it sounds, getting the entire industry to shift to a new infrastructure that is incompatible with the old, and not only get the pc world to switch but all the consoles, is a tough sell.

ViN86
03-12-09, 12:14 PM
raytracing has been thrown up as a possible replacement for todays current rendering methods in games for a little while now. As promising as it sounds, getting the entire industry to shift to a new infrastructure that is incompatible with the old, and not only get the pc world to switch but all the consoles, is a tough sell.

again, if you read my post directly above yours, i dont think caustic is trying to replace the gaming industry with raytracing. i think theyre aiming at the digital animation industry, which with movies and all, represents hundreds of millions of dollars.

MaxFX
03-12-09, 02:53 PM
Well the more I read up on it the merrier, they seems to definetly be on to something here and its ppl that obviously have done there homework as they have worked for Apple, ATI, Intel and NVIDIA do sound good atleast so who knows maybe this is a real revolution it seems!

And as you say it's not for gaming at first hand but we all know how quik that can all change. it will be a supercharged processor just for doing all this algoritm besides the regular CPU/GPU!

Atleast we can all thank nVidia that we no longer need any more card just for physics and nVidia and ATI will start doing AI and all this with just the GPU. so bring it out this will only be one more card besides the GFX / Sound card so why the hell not :D

One thing is for sure, do they really deliver ppl will stand in line just to buy this card and the game devs will jump all over it. this and nVidia 3D can be the future and the future may be here sooner then we think. and right there did the larrabee just died :D

Toss3
03-12-09, 05:18 PM
raytracing has been thrown up as a possible replacement for todays current rendering methods in games for a little while now. As promising as it sounds, getting the entire industry to shift to a new infrastructure that is incompatible with the old, and not only get the pc world to switch but all the consoles, is a tough sell.

Add-in cards people, add-in cards! ;)

WeReWoLf
03-12-09, 06:58 PM
Physx? Possibly to be bought out by nVidia and coded to perform through Cuda?