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seeker
06-24-09, 11:52 AM
Something different that I found in this driver, that I hadn't seen in previous versions is a listing for Apache Server, connected with the Nvidia Network Access Manager. I know something about what an Apache Server is, but what does it have to do with anything Nvidia? Even though it appears to only be listening, a server is primarily designed to send data, more than to receive it. In any case, I fail to understand why this is necessary at all? I did kill the process, and my network connection continued to work properly, so what is this doing?

qrek
06-24-09, 01:41 PM
Well.. you just have apache installed. Have you installed anything like xampp, php, mysql or maybe someone else is also using this computer?

Server by definition is designed to listen for data and it can also respond to that data/connection by sending some other data (is apache case: a web page). If you kill apache people won't be able to open webpages that reside on your pc. If you don't host any webpage you can safely uninstall apache (check control panel).

And no, it's got nothing to do with any drivers.

seeker
06-24-09, 02:20 PM
I have none of the programs installed that you listed, nor any other programs that might possibly have server functions. Every program that I now have installed is ones that I have used previously and am familiar with. No one touches this computer except myself, and I do not have or maintain a webpage or such. As I said, killing the server process does not effect my use of the internet in any fashion that I have found.

Both the process's path and command line point directly to the Nvidia driver as can be seen in the image below...therefore, I would think that it definitely does have to do with the Nvidia driver.

EDIT: There is no entry in Add/Remove Programs for Apache, so it is not possible to uninstall it, without uninstalling 186.18. I know that I can block it using my firewall, but that is not the question.

seeker
06-24-09, 02:41 PM
Thinking further on this, I think that the server is part of the Nforce Network driver, rather than the video driver, but if that is so, I must have been sleeping, because I didn't see it, until after installing the video driver...I don't know.

sharangad
06-24-09, 03:30 PM
Apache is probably the web server used by nvidia's network access manager (firewall) software to allow its setting to be configured. This can only be done in a browser.

I no longer use NAM as it causes a lot of problems.

seeker
06-24-09, 04:06 PM
Apache is probably the web server used by nvidia's network access manager (firewall) software to allow its setting to be configured. This can only be done in a browser.

This may be true, but I'm surprised that I never saw it before now. I have installed the Nforce driver a number of times on several Windows versions, and never noticed it before.

I no longer use NAM as it causes a lot of problems.
Since I think that this is a function of the chipsets on the MB, do I have a choice without replacing the MB?

SLippe
06-24-09, 05:00 PM
I've never installed NAM. Too many horror stories.

seeker
06-24-09, 05:17 PM
Until now,I have never had a problem with it, but whether I did or not, the question that remains is how I would connect to the internet without it. On a fresh install of the OS, there is a 1394 connection automatically created by the OS, but I can't access the internet until I install the NAM driver, which creats a working LAN connection.

If you never use it, does that mean that you never use a MB with Nvidia chipsets?

nekrosoft13
06-24-09, 07:47 PM
just don't install NAM, it is not necessary for anything really. like rest said it just causes issues.

when instlaling nforce drivers, go to custom and delect NAM, network driver will install fine, just NAM won't

seeker
06-24-09, 08:27 PM
It has been too long since I installed the Nforce driver to remember whether the NAM was a separate option or not, but even if it is, I fail to understand how to get an internet connection without it. Perhaps this should be clear, but it isn't. The NAM does have it's own listing in ARP, so it can be removed, but if I do that, what is going to make the connection?

I suppose that I should just take the suggestions of this thread for granted and experiment, but I don't like the idea of fixing something that isn't broken without a better understanding. To start with, what kind of problems has this be known to cause?

nekrosoft13
06-24-09, 08:50 PM
there is network driver, and there is NAM a useless network manager that causes problems.

two seperate things.

seeker
06-24-09, 09:14 PM
Okay, I gave up and went ahead and uninstalled NAM, even though I'm not sure why. However, the Apache Server no longer appears in the process list, so I guess that's one step forward.

sharangad
06-26-09, 05:21 PM
Okay, I gave up and went ahead and uninstalled NAM, even though I'm not sure why. However, the Apache Server no longer appears in the process list, so I guess that's one step forward.

NAM's a firewall which has some hardware support from the mobo.

seeker
06-27-09, 02:04 PM
I wonder why they couldn't call a firewall a firewall? That would have made things much clearer.