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Bigbuck
07-18-09, 03:30 PM
I was thinking of possibly building a home server out of spare parts. Would I would like it to do is host a website and be connected to a domain name I own. The other thing I would like it to do is act as a file storage server for photos, backups, etc. Obviously this would have to be protected from access outside of the network. I have used Apache2Triad in the past to host websites off of PC's so that is what I would probably use. I would probably be running Vista Ultimate as I have the retail copy and would hate to see that go to waste when I upgrade to Win7. So my questions are:

1. What system specs would be recommended? I assume it wouldn't take much, but I honestly don't have any idea.
2. Could I use something like DynDNS (https://www.dyndns.com/) and connect with my domain name so users outside the network could use that instead of the IP.
3. I would like to use Filezilla Server for easy FTP to the machine. Would this be safe enough? I know I had to shutoff Windows Firewall on another machine as it interfered with the server. Would a third party firewall be required?

I'm sure there are more question I have, but can't think of any right now. Any help would be appreciated.

krokodil
07-20-09, 03:09 AM
If you're building from spare parts nothing about system specs has to be considered. You take what you have :) - if you've got several parts to choose from things get different.

1. I would not go with any kind of Windows for a server - be it Vista or Windows 7. Use Linux. Or better, get a copy of (open)solaris.
2. If you're talking about a homeserver you sure think running 24/7. How will be the usage pattern? Will it be a source of your business then it must have high availability and proper backup procedures must be in place. Or is it just the source of your evening entertainment (video / dvd streaming)? If it's just for your entertainment a RAID setup and an ups is not necessary. If you're running 24/7 power consumption becomes a factor, at least I do care and there's a difference paying 100 bucks or 300 per month.

PS: RAID is not a replacement for proper backups but it shure does help if you've mirrored (level 1) and checksummed (level 5) your data.

Bigbuck
07-20-09, 08:56 AM
I was just thinking of getting one big drive, probably a 1TB, and using that. All I really want to do with it is use it to host a website and store files. It would most likely be running 24/7 and yes I also care about the power bill so something lower power would be great.

krokodil
07-20-09, 11:18 PM
Ok, I've got a spare E1200 and DDR2 memory sticks laying around so I've decided to get a Zotac 9300 mini-ITX board (got it in the meantime). I might switch the RAID-10 on my new build to RAID-5 and free a TB disk. I also have a BD-player waiting to be used. So that too might go into my home server. The 9300 has only 2 SATA ports so backup will be to an external disk (I have a Maxtor OneTouch for that).
My problem is getting the door cam into the system so I can monitor my condo from the office and getting a PCIe cable-tv card.

Bigbuck
08-20-09, 11:22 PM
I have done some more thinking and research on this as well as acquired some software. I have a copy of Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition and Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition x86. I have used Windows Server 2003 in the past and Windows is what I know so I am definitely sticking to that. My only question is which version should I run?
My second point of research has been a good WAMP package to run a website and mail server. I have tried XAMMP, WAMP, and Apache2Triad thus far. Currently I use WAMP for local testing only and I am not sure if I would trust it on a live site. I also have Apache2Triad setup on Windows Server 2003 that hosts two websites. I like its simplicity and out of the box setup, but its lack of updates worries me. My other option is to figure out how to install the needed packages such as PHP, MySQL, Apache, etc myself. This brings me to another option. Since Windows Server comes with IIS, would anyone recommend using that over Apache. I honestly have not looked at IIS or even really heard of it until I started researching.

nekrosoft13
08-20-09, 11:37 PM
I have done some more thinking and research on this as well as acquired some software. I have a copy of Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition and Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition x86. I have used Windows Server 2003 in the past and Windows is what I know so I am definitely sticking to that. My only question is which version should I run?

Depends on our specs, if specs are lower then stick to 2003, if specs are decent then 2008.
And if possible then 2008 R2. I would also stick to windows server if you have it, especially if you are not very familiar with Linux.

Bigbuck
08-20-09, 11:40 PM
I have little to no Linux experience and was actually considering it before I got the two copies of Windows Server. I will probably end up using my E6600 and at least 4GB of RAM. I will have to research 2003 vs 2008 some more but the only thing I was worried about was my copy of 2008 is x86. I am not sure if the RAM limits change for server versions of Windows or not.

nekrosoft13
08-20-09, 11:44 PM
I have little to no Linux experience and was actually considering it before I got the two copies of Windows Server. I will probably end up using my E6600 and at least 4GB of RAM. I will have to research 2003 vs 2008 some more but the only thing I was worried about was my copy of 2008 is x86. I am not sure if the RAM limits change for server versions of Windows or not.

ram "limits" have nothing to do with client or server OS. It is 32bit limitation.

Keys for Vista/Server 2008 are not architecture locked. Meaning your 32bit key will work with 64bit Server.

With E6600 and 4GB I would go with 2008

Bigbuck
08-20-09, 11:50 PM
I was worried since I got my key on DreamSpark that it wouldn't worked, but I just looked it up and it seems it will work fine so Windows Server 2008 x64 it is :).