PDA

View Full Version : SSD questions


DiscipleDOC
09-03-09, 05:58 PM
Ok, I know I may sound not too intelligent for asking these questions, but I have to know:

What's the big deal about SSD?
Why would I buy an 80gb SSD when I could get a 1tb SATA drive for a lot less?

bacon12
09-03-09, 06:39 PM
Speed is really the only advantage for a dt.

Mr Bigman
09-03-09, 06:51 PM
Agreed.

Your paying for speed which you can get out of SAS drives if you arrey enough of em.

Spend money on really fast Black edition drives and stripe alot of them to get the speed.

Bman212121
09-03-09, 07:16 PM
Agreed.

Your paying for speed which you can get out of SAS drives if you arrey enough of em.

Spend money on really fast Black edition drives and stripe alot of them to get the speed.

It's not just the throughput. I could get as much throughput out of a few normal HDDs in RAID 0.


@DDoc: The biggest advantage of these devices is latency. An average seek time of a hard drive might be 7ms where an SSD only takes .01 ms to access the same block of data. Not having to wait between each block of data is what makes random reads and random writes blow any mechanical hard drive right out of the water. What it translates into is a much snappier pc.

I think Anand put it best when he stated it's like going from dial-up to high speed. Everything loads quicker and you'll just get used to how fast everything reacts. It isn't until someone takes it back away from you until you realize how much slower it actually was.

I don't have first hand experience yet so I cannot give my opinion, but trust me when I say I've read hundreds of articles about the drives. Once the Intel 160GB G2 SSD fiasco is over that is what I will most likely get.

betterdan
09-03-09, 08:17 PM
Aren't these drives less reliable right now? I mean what is the deal with defragmenting them and can't they be written to a lot less times than a regular hard drive? Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

Bman212121
09-03-09, 08:31 PM
Aren't these drives less reliable right now? I mean what is the deal with defragmenting them and can't they be written to a lot less times than a regular hard drive? Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

Well the main thing is they are still so new they just don't have a track record yet. A quality SSD could easily last 10 years or more with regular use. It is true that defragmenting will lower the life span of the drive because it will cause unnecessary wear and tear of the drive. The data blocks don't need to be lined up sequentially like they do on a mechanical HDD because there are no read write heads to pass data under. So defragmenting is unneeded for an SSD anyway.

A typical drive like the X25-M or the OCZ Vertex uses MLC (Multi layer cell) memory which can only be written to approximately 10,000 times before the cells with start to go bad. The thing to remember is that these drives work around that limit by shifting data to new parts of the drive every time it writes data. If you had an 80GB SSD and only 20GB of data, you would need to rewrite that 20GB of data 4 times before you use 1 write cycle. that means you'd need to write about 40,000 chunks of 20GB of data to your drive before you might start seeing issues with it. Reads do not effect the life of the drive so they don't count again you.

An enterprise version of the more expensive SLC (Single Layer Cell) can handle 100,000 writes, so it could last 10x as long.

ATi
09-03-09, 08:54 PM
Will a SSD give you better FPS on games?
(ot) but I just ordered a external hard drive can I install games on it?and will it **** up my fps on games installed on it?

hokeyplyr48
09-04-09, 07:53 AM
It wouldn't really make a big difference in the FPS of the games but loading screens will completely disappear. And installing things to an external drive seems like a bad idea because you're limited to the bandwidth of the connection. I'm presuming USB which would be significantly slower than the bandwidth available on SATA 3.0

Zelda_fan
09-04-09, 09:08 AM
Ok, I know I may sound not too intelligent for asking these questions, but I have to know:

What's the big deal about SSD?
Why would I buy an 80gb SSD when I could get a 1tb SATA drive for a lot less?

The random read/write times for small files are literally an order of magnitude faster on SSDs. All the little BS file I/Os that take a second here and there will now be done instantly. Quite possibly the biggest speed advancement since dial-up to broadband.

Zelda_fan
09-04-09, 09:09 AM
It wouldn't really make a big difference in the FPS of the games but loading screens will completely disappear. And installing things to an external drive seems like a bad idea because you're limited to the bandwidth of the connection. I'm presuming USB which would be significantly slower than the bandwidth available on SATA 3.0

Believe it or not Crysis scored like 5fps faster when you run a SSD.

lduguay
09-04-09, 09:39 AM
For heavy database servers (or Web Servers), the SSD's make a tremendous difference in terms of IOPS and cost per TPS. Large enterprise database servers traditionally uses huge DRAM based arrays and InfiniBand 96Gb/s switched fabric links with costs in the 7-8 digits. There is still a lot of concerns with SSDs for large enterprises, but it is slowly bridging the gap for small-medium size high performance databases.

hokeyplyr48
09-04-09, 10:07 AM
Believe it or not Crysis scored like 5fps faster when you run a SSD.

Oh wow, well I stand corrected. Thanks for the info

DiscipleDOC
09-04-09, 10:09 AM
Well, I think that I will still wait for the SSD's to come down in price. I want something that can store large amounts of data, and also be cost effective. Right now, the SSD's is not either.

hokeyplyr48
09-04-09, 10:10 AM
Well yea if you're looking for storage space, a SSD should never have crossed your mind....

betterdan
09-04-09, 11:12 AM
Well, I think that I will still wait for the SSD's to come down in price. I want something that can store large amounts of data, and also be cost effective. Right now, the SSD's is not either.

Sounds like you are looking for Bob's mouth.

:D

Revs
09-04-09, 11:23 AM
It's not just the throughput. I could get as much throughput out of a few normal HDDs in RAID 0.


@DDoc: The biggest advantage of these devices is latency. An average seek time of a hard drive might be 7ms where an SSD only takes .01 ms to access the same block of data. Not having to wait between each block of data is what makes random reads and random writes blow any mechanical hard drive right out of the water. What it translates into is a much snappier pc.

Nail on head. It's the best upgrade for almost any use.

Other than the high price/mb, there really isn't a down side. I'm still being careful to back everything up, but that's just a precaution. I'm yet to find anything it doesn't do much faster than my RaptorX. You don't realise how much HDD's slow your PC down until you have a go with an SSD :D.

CaptNKILL
09-04-09, 11:24 AM
Ideally you want to get an SSD capable of storing your OS and all of the programs\games that you use, and then have a standard hard drive (or two or three) to hold the rest of your data.

Until we get affordable 1Tb SSDs this is how it has to be.

Revs
09-04-09, 11:28 AM
^ Agreed. I would only use it as the system drive. It seems a waste of money for storage to me.