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View Full Version : Can you play Quake on a router?


XDanger
12-07-09, 05:35 AM
:) ?

I didnt know they run linux and have an equivilent of a pentium 1 in there.

frenchy2k1
12-07-09, 01:50 PM
Provided there is no display, this is going to be slightly difficult to "play", but nothing is impossible...

As you said, those include 200+MHz processors and I played quake on a Pentium 133. It was slow and ugly though.

Revs
12-07-09, 02:11 PM
I'm lost for words :lol:

Why would you even think of this?

XDanger
12-08-09, 12:34 AM
I'm lost for words :lol:

Why would you even think of this?

:D I have an unusual mind.

CaptNKILL
12-08-09, 12:46 AM
Someone would have to make a source port of the Quake engine for whatever kind of processor is inside a router for this to work.

I don't know anything (at all) about routers, but my guess is that they don't have all of the requirements to fully emulate a computer.

Rakeesh
12-08-09, 04:45 AM
:) ?

I didnt know they run linux and have an equivilent of a pentium 1 in there.

Not quite. This is typically a MIPS32 processor which doesn't have all of the same features as a typical desktop CPU. Although it is more efficient clock for clock at integer functions, it falls rather short in several other areas.

That aside:

You probably can do this with a few major caveats.

First, the router has no display hardware at all, so you'd need to have the graphics rendering done on another computer.

That can happen in one of a few ways:

- An ASCII renderer over a telnet or ssh session (Yes, there is one written for quake. Here's a video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwOi6uXfd2I) of an ascii renderer in quake3, and yes that is really all moving text you are looking at.)
- Some kind of a VNC server running on the router with a client running on another computer (this would be slow and a bit on the unplayable side.)
- Some other form of simulating a desktop tunneled over the network that isn't as slow as VNC (none come to mind.)

Either of the later two options would require you to write some form of driver that works independently of having an existing framebuffer. Not easily done, and if you knew how to write up such a scheme, you wouldn't be asking here.

Second, you're going to need some form of storage for the game data itself other than the RAM (I don't think the NVRAM on most routers is enough, but a CIFS or NFS share would do.)

Third, given that there's pretty much no way for you to connect any HID's (mouse, keyboard) to the router without some heavy hardware and software modification (or some kind of device that connects them straight to a network, with a server and everything, that I've never heard of) all control must be done from another computer.

Fourth, I'm honestly not sure how you'd get sound to work if you did this over a telnet session with an ascii renderer. My guess is don't even try unless the only sound effect you want to hear is a terminal ring signal. A VNC type solution would be fairly straightforward on the other hand though.

If you're willing to put up with all of that (and running it from the router seems mostly pointless with these caveats,) then I imagine it's just a matter of grabbing the quake source, getting the source for the renderer of your choice, building and cross compiling it to the MIPS architecture, loading it to the CIFS/NFS share of your choice, and just running the game over your telnet/ssh session (probably telnet since it would eat up considerably less CPU.)

EDIT: Actually I think it would be just a matter of cross compiling ttyquake.

http://webpages.mr.net/bobz/ttyquake/

If you used that with the shareware quake libraries (level data, sprites, textures, etc,) it might be around 9MB total compressed, which could well fit in the NVRAM on a few routers, but not most.

Viral
12-08-09, 06:04 AM
I could see Sony taping 50 routers together as the GPU for the PS4 and then crying to Nvidia to make them a GPU at the last minute.

nekrosoft13
12-08-09, 10:20 AM
Provided there is no display, this is going to be slightly difficult to "play", but nothing is impossible...

As you said, those include 200+MHz processors and I played quake on a Pentium 133. It was slow and ugly though.

mine got 600+MHz CPU ;)

Q
12-08-09, 10:22 AM
I can play all sorts of games on my router.

pfSense running on a Dual Core Atom board.

nekrosoft13
12-08-09, 10:24 AM
:) ?

I didnt know they run linux and have an equivilent of a pentium 1 in there.

seems like dlink was thinking about you

http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=695

you got your display, you can also add a hard drive