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View Full Version : Driver Removal Procedures?


DenverBuc
07-14-03, 04:04 PM
OK, sorry for such a n00b question, but I want to make sure I am doing it right.

How do you all suggest to upgrade detonator drivers?

What is the best way?:confused:

hohum
07-14-03, 04:12 PM
Remove them in add/remove, reboot, install new. That's all i've ever done over the past 2 years, and never had a problem with it - I personally haven't bothered with things like detonator destroyer, or deleting reg keys etc.

DenverBuc
07-14-03, 04:19 PM
Hohum, yeah, but normally when I do that, Windows XP tries to install new ones because it detects new hardware. Do you reboot to safe mode?

The Baron
07-14-03, 04:21 PM
Nah. Just uninstall the old and install the new ones. The WinXP drivers are pretty harmless.

saturnotaku
07-14-03, 09:55 PM
I reboot into Safe Mode before I uninstall my old drivers. Use add/remove programs while in safe mode to uninstall. Reboot when prompted. Upon rebooting, Windows will automatically detect new hardware. Let it do its thing, when it's finished install new drivers, reboot again and you're done.

darkmiasma
07-14-03, 10:18 PM
1. unzip drivers to folder i want them in
2. uninstall old drivers from the control panel
3. reboot
4. point XP to new drivers inf file
5. play games

lalittle
07-16-03, 04:58 PM
Or you could try just installing right over the top of the old ones, which has worked for me for quite a while now. I used to always uninstall, but after running into inconsistant results from one time to the next and from one system to the next, I decided to just try following the official nvidia instructions which say to just install right over the old ones. I found that this actually led to much more consistant and less problematic installations.

I tend to think that the idea of uninstalling first is somewhat of a holdover from when this actually did make a difference. In my experience, however, this hasn't been necessary for a while now, and uninstalling first has actually lead to MORE problems for me. There was an issue when going from 3x.xx to 4x.xx series drivers, but this was a problem no matter how you installed, and it was fixed with a patch.

Note that when going BACKWARDS -- i.e. installing an older driver to replace a newer one -- I WOULD uninstall the old ones first, or if using XP, just do a roll-back.

Larry

The Baron
07-16-03, 05:05 PM
Note that when going BACKWARDS -- i.e. installing an older driver to replace a newer one -- I WOULD uninstall the old ones first, or if using XP, just do a roll-back.
A rollback... how... quaint. :p

First thing I do when I install Windows? Disable System Restore. ;)

lalittle
07-16-03, 08:36 PM
First thing I do when I install Windows? Disable System Restore. ;)
Why?

Larry

Bubba
07-16-03, 08:44 PM
Here's three good reasons. I'm sure Baron or someone else could supply more:

1- Waste of storage space (not so big an issue for some)
2- Waste of memory resources
3- Known to cause intermittent conlficts with other apps, esp. games

Filibuster
07-16-03, 09:18 PM
I believe that even with system restore disabled you can still go back to a previous driver, but not do system restore points.
It does on my system anyway.

I usually don't use that unless a new driver breaks something though.

lalittle
07-16-03, 09:19 PM
Originally posted by Bubba
Here's three good reasons. I'm sure Baron or someone else could supply more:

1- Waste of storage space (not so big an issue for some)
2- Waste of memory resources
3- Known to cause intermittent conlficts with other apps, esp. games

The storage issue seems rather moot given not only the current size of hard drives, but the ability to tell XP how much room to dedicate to the restore funciton.

As far as memory goes, this also seems moot based on the fact that memory is so plentiful on the average machine these days, and from what I've heard the restore capability really doesn't eat that much memory anyway. That aside, do you happen to know how much memory the restore capability actually takes?

Compatibility-wise, I honestly haven't heard of this being an issue. Turning off the system restore capability is something that doesn't seem to be suggested very much as a means of troubleshooting. I'm not saying it's "never" suggested, but from my reading it certainly isn't at the top of the list of things to try. In fact, I see a LOT of posts on game related boards praising the restore function as an easy way of testing out newer drivers while allowing a fast and easy means of getting back to the previous drivers should problems arise. In other words, gamers seem to a group that specifically takes advantage of the restore capabilities.

Do you happen to know of any specific games where shutting of the restore function is necessary?

Thanks,

Larry

Bubba
07-16-03, 10:22 PM
Sorry, I can't help with any specific examples. I'm pretty much reciting what I've read on various forums and sites. I know that doesn't help you much...

As for my first two points, they're certainly not moot for me and that's whay I posted. This may sound kinda purist, but I'm real big on keeping regular images of my partitions. I've many images handy in case I want to load to a particular point for a specific reason. ie.- fresh OS install, fresh OS install with certain driver set, etc. Becasue I manage things this way, the actual use of System Restore would be redundant.

Anywho- I believe Filibuster is right. To sort of get back on topic, you can roll back to a previous driver without having the System Restore function enabled. System restore, I think, monitors actual installations, creating restore points before and after each install. Not all driver updates require installations.

The Baron
07-16-03, 10:41 PM
Originally posted by lalittle
The storage issue seems rather moot given not only the current size of hard drives, but the ability to tell XP how much room to dedicate to the restore funciton.

As far as memory goes, this also seems moot based on the fact that memory is so plentiful on the average machine these days, and from what I've heard the restore capability really doesn't eat that much memory anyway. That aside, do you happen to know how much memory the restore capability actually takes?

Compatibility-wise, I honestly haven't heard of this being an issue. Turning off the system restore capability is something that doesn't seem to be suggested very much as a means of troubleshooting. I'm not saying it's "never" suggested, but from my reading it certainly isn't at the top of the list of things to try. In fact, I see a LOT of posts on game related boards praising the restore function as an easy way of testing out newer drivers while allowing a fast and easy means of getting back to the previous drivers should problems arise. In other words, gamers seem to a group that specifically takes advantage of the restore capabilities.

Do you happen to know of any specific games where shutting of the restore function is necessary?

Thanks,

Larry
Basically?

It's not clean. Anything that adds to Windows bloat and has features that I won't use often (read: daily) must die. Plus, I would imagine it impairs some of the more arcane DLL hacking that I do regularly. And my registry hacks? Oh, that's every other day. And System Restore will either catch these things and back them up (which I don't believe it does), try to prevent me from doing so (which it does in the form of Windows File Protection), or just be completely unable to deal with it. And, since it's number 3, me and System Restore? Bad, bad, bad, bad idea.

Plus on the one system I actually did try it on, it didn't work in the least (actually screwed things over so badly that a reformat was necessary). So yeah. Staying far away from those "save you from yourself" things.