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Vardant
01-29-11, 05:48 AM
Subpixel Reconstruction Antialiasing (SRAA) combines single-pixel (1x) shading with subpixel visibility to create antialiased images without increasing the shading cost. SRAA targets deferred-shading renderers, which cannot use multisample antialiasing. SRAA operates as a post-process on a rendered image with superresolution depth and normal buffers, so it can be incorporated into an existing renderer without modifying the shaders. In this way SRAA resembles Morphological Antialiasing (MLAA), but the new algorithm can better respect geometric boundaries and has fixed runtime independent of scene and image complexity. SRAA benefits shading-bound applications. For example, our implementation evaluates SRAA in 1.8 ms (1280x720) to yield antialiasing quality comparable to 4-16x shading. Thus SRAA would produce a net speedup over supersampling for applications that spend 1 ms or more on shading; for comparison, most modern games spend 5-10 ms shading. We also describe simplifications that increase performance by reducing quality.
http://research.nvidia.com/publication/subpixel-reconstruction-antialiasing

Next driver can't come soon enough :thumbsup:

grey_1
01-29-11, 06:22 AM
the new algorithm can better respect geometric boundaries and has fixed runtime independent of scene and image complexity

So less blurriness and better performance than MLAA. Unless I'm reading this wrong.

Yes, looking forward to it. :)

K007
01-29-11, 06:35 AM
i guess mlaa/sraa are the only things that can help for those games where developer just doesn't want to give aa support...due to console porting.

grey_1
01-29-11, 06:40 AM
i guess mlaa/sraa are the only things that can help for those games where developer just doesn't want to give aa support...due to console porting.

Heh, I didn't even think about the ports...that will be nice.

FearMeAll
01-29-11, 08:07 AM
I LOVE THE FUTURE!!

Redeemed
01-29-11, 12:51 PM
Thank you ATi for introducing MLAA, thus forcing nVidia to follow suit and come out with their own version. Once again, competition equals win for us consumers! :D


/tRollo baiting. :bleh:

Roadhog
01-29-11, 02:00 PM
I'm sure it will be identical to mlaa.

Destroy
01-29-11, 02:26 PM
I'm sure it will be identical to mlaa.

Most likely, yeah. But which card will be able to do this new SRAA feature?

jolle
01-29-11, 02:53 PM
Next driver can't come soon enough :thumbsup:
So.. is this coming in the next driver rev or what?

Roadhog
01-29-11, 02:55 PM
Most likely, yeah. But which card will be able to do this new SRAA feature?

No clue, I assume all the 500 series at least.

Muppet
01-29-11, 04:47 PM
Thank you ATi for introducing MLAA, thus forcing nVidia to follow suit and come out with their own version. Once again, competition equals win for us consumers! :D


/tRollo baiting. :bleh:

Yes :)

grey_1
01-29-11, 04:51 PM
So.. is this coming in the next driver rev or what?

The article has a date of Feb 2011 over the download placeholder, so hopefully.

Also hoping it's 400 and 500 series Fermis, not just the 500. Should be...

Sazar
01-29-11, 06:47 PM
Thank you ATi for introducing MLAA, thus forcing nVidia to follow suit and come out with their own version. Once again, competition equals win for us consumers! :D


/tRollo baiting. :bleh:

(popcorn)

fivefeet8
01-29-11, 09:19 PM
Most likely, yeah. But which card will be able to do this new SRAA feature?

Seeing as compute shading support for all GTX 4/5 cards are identical, it should run at least on those two generations. If SRAA can run on the lowest version of Compute Shading, then it should run on hardware all the way down to the G8x/9x cards. This is assuming it uses CS for processing like MLAA.

fivefeet8
01-29-11, 09:36 PM
I'm sure it will be identical to mlaa.

They are both post process effects, but beyond that no. MLAA works by taking high contrast areas and blending them together for a best guess approach to finding edges. SRAA requires subpixel information so it needs access to some type of depth buffer to get that information.

jlippo
01-31-11, 05:14 AM
They are both post process effects, but beyond that no. MLAA works by taking high contrast areas and blending them together for a best guess approach to finding edges. SRAA requires subpixel information so it needs access to some type of depth buffer to get that information.
This also means that it should be superior to MLAA especially in case where polygon edge is vertical or horizontal, in which case MLAA doesn't do a thing.

Most likely it should handle small polygons better as well, although it will be interesting to see a case of very thin lines where only every 5th pixel are actually shaded and the depth buffer tells clearly that the surface is there..