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ViN86
03-06-12, 05:23 PM
The free version of VmWare player 4.0 runs Win 8. But I could not create a VM directly from the iso. I did create a Win 7 64b VM, mount the Win 8 iso and run it from there. You will need the universal Win 8 product key here>
Windows 8 Product key (http://techie-buzz.com/softwares/windows-8-product-key-consumer-preview.html)

I got VMWare Workstation 8 to install the ISO. I just created a generic Windows 7 x64 VM and installed the OS after I created the VM (check the "do not install an OS now" option).

jcrox
03-06-12, 09:11 PM
and I am one of them....
...haha no but I know what you mean.

Say if you have experience supporting/customizing/deploying at the enterprise level, can I prvt message you for some ERP...i mean to ask about Salesforce.com

PM away, I'd be glad to help

mojoman0
03-09-12, 07:50 PM
http://gizmodo.com/5891926/6-ways-to-totally-avoid-metro-and-use-only-desktop-mode-in-windows-8

6 Ways to Totally Avoid Metro and Use Only Desktop Mode in Windows 8

six_storm
03-09-12, 10:17 PM
http://gizmodo.com/5891926/6-ways-to-totally-avoid-metro-and-use-only-desktop-mode-in-windows-8

6 Ways to Totally Avoid Metro and Use Only Desktop Mode in Windows 8

That's a lot of tweaking to just avoid Metro. I'd rather go with the flow and accept what's there, just my 2 cents.

Cylphid
03-10-12, 09:09 AM
Just read the Anandtech preview and the under the hood changes are indeed very nice as expected. Even though I'd barely use them because my PC is just for gaming, those changes are still very welcomed and useful!

But the way they're forcing Metro on everyone (Desktop users) is just a shame.

I totally agree. I thought all the negative feedback so far would sway MS, but apparently they know what we want better than we do. :p

ViN86
03-10-12, 09:57 AM
Honestly, Metro probably is more efficient, but the learning curve associated with migrating from the old UI that we're used to, to Metro is probably more than users want to put up with. I don't really want to learn how to use Metro lol.

six_storm
03-10-12, 02:23 PM
Honestly, Metro probably is more efficient, but the learning curve associated with migrating from the old UI that we're used to, to Metro is probably more than users want to put up with. I don't really want to learn how to use Metro lol.

This. Users for business are going to hate this and I dread the flood of questions and training that comes down the pipe. I still like Metro and it will take some time getting used to, but you can bet that once Win8 goes RC, I'll be using it right away.

mojoman0
03-10-12, 04:18 PM
Just read the Anandtech preview and the under the hood changes are indeed very nice as expected. Even though I'd barely use them because my PC is just for gaming, those changes are still very welcomed and useful!

But the way they're forcing Metro on everyone (Desktop users) is just a shame.

they might just be forcing it on everyone now in the consumer preview so that they get valuable feedback before everyone just shuts off metro by default

Shamrock
03-10-12, 08:54 PM
I'll use a mac before I use Win8/Metro. in it's current state.

Cylphid
03-12-12, 08:10 AM
This. Users for business are going to hate this and I dread the flood of questions and training that comes down the pipe. I still like Metro and it will take some time getting used to, but you can bet that once Win8 goes RC, I'll be using it right away.

Has your company already decided to use 8?

I've decided to dl this and learn what I can of it. We won't be migrating, but I'm sure some customers will, so I may as well get a jump on it.

Redeemed
03-12-12, 09:00 AM
Has your company already decided to use 8?

I've decided to dl this and learn what I can of it. We won't be migrating, but I'm sure some customers will, so I may as well get a jump on it.

Because of this I'm going to keep Win8 installed in a VM. Will have to learn the intricacies of this new OS so I may better serve any clients that are using it.

Cylphid
03-12-12, 09:30 AM
Because of this I'm going to keep Win8 installed in a VM. Will have to learn the intricacies of this new OS so I may better serve any clients that are using it.

Yep - it can't hurt, and we all know there will be a ton of oem machines out there using it. I don't want to get bitten by the "you look stupid" bug in front of a client :lol:

Bman212121
03-12-12, 09:02 PM
I totally agree. I thought all the negative feedback so far would sway MS, but apparently they know what we want better than we do. :p

The only place I seem to see a lot of negative feedback is from comments and forums. If you read well written articles by tech journalists there is a lot more positive feedback.

I'd say you really want to learn metro because you'll be supporting it on a lot more than just desktops. Windows 8 is definitely going to be needed for laptops to be able to compete with devices like the Transformer Prime. If I had a device like that running Windows 8 it would be simply amazing. I could definitely see laptop makers really start pushing touch screens to help sell new laptops, so it only makes sense to have Windows 8 to fully utilize them.

Like Slawter said, the anandtech review is definitely worth a read. There are a whole lot of other neat features in Windows 8 that are going to be worth upgrading for. I might start using the backup software now that it supports something similar to Time Machine. If you don't know what that is it's a piece of software on OS X that saves all of your changes and lets you revert back to any point in time. Think of it as incremental backups for all of your files where you can revert a file back to an older date. It's definitely a good piece of software and a welcome addition to have something like it in Windows. One other thing I learned was another way search is faster on Metro. If you're on the start screen simply start typing and it will start searching for you.

six_storm
03-12-12, 09:40 PM
Has your company already decided to use 8?

I've decided to dl this and learn what I can of it. We won't be migrating, but I'm sure some customers will, so I may as well get a jump on it.

Our company tries real hard to stay on top of the tech game, so we will install it just mainly to be familiar with it. Most guys won't take the time to keep a VM on hand for fun.

I'm not sure if we will recommend it or not, but I'm sure that people will go out to their Best Buy stores, buy the cheapest thing and expect it to work perfectly on their corporate network. We still gotta support it. :(

Either way, I think Win8 will do just fine once users get used to it. It's basically Win7 with the Metro UI. And heck, find a way to disable Metro and you'll have a rocking OS.

Redeemed
03-12-12, 10:58 PM
:lol:

Well said, Cylphid. :D

Cylphid
03-13-12, 05:04 AM
Our company tries real hard to stay on top of the tech game, so we will install it just mainly to be familiar with it. Most guys won't take the time to keep a VM on hand for fun.

I'm not sure if we will recommend it or not, but I'm sure that people will go out to their Best Buy stores, buy the cheapest thing and expect it to work perfectly on their corporate network. We still gotta support it. :(

Either way, I think Win8 will do just fine once users get used to it. It's basically Win7 with the Metro UI. And heck, find a way to disable Metro and you'll have a rocking OS.

Yep, I think we're both on the same page here.

I do have to say I should have installed it before saying anything negative as I did earlier.

The learning curve for anyone who only knows "click orb" :lol: is going to be steep.

Personally, I'm impressed - my first impressions were faster than 7, smooth, easy on the eyes and it recognized just about everything hardware wise in my G74sx. I have some Asus specific drivers to install for the fn keys, but heck, it installed just about ready to go. Win 7 needed a bit more.

I'll give this a fair shake, glad I installed it now. Oh - it's super fast on a 7200rpm scorpio, I wish I had a spare SSD hanging around....

EDIT: Forgot to mention - making the shutdown/restart/logoff button easier to access would be a plus :lol:

Q
03-13-12, 07:59 AM
I wonder what the Enterprise Preview will look like.

Cylphid
03-13-12, 04:38 PM
Well, after some time with this, I have to say I believe removing the orb was a huge mistake. It isn't that anything is difficult to find or use, it's that nothing about this interface is intuitive at all.

Everything from installation to configuring multiple monitors was reasonably painless, and everything about this OS from file transfers to extracting just seems snappier and smoother.

Metro has a good deal of functionality from reviews I've read, but using them just doesn't feel right - maybe it will grow on me, but I don't think so.

It's just not an efficient start menu for the average user.

Melfranks
03-14-12, 10:41 AM
EDIT: Forgot to mention - making the shutdown/restart/logoff button easier to access would be a plus :lol:

WIN+I, <up arrow>, <enter> brings you to the Sleep, Shutdown, Reset menu.
Just <up arrow> again to your choice.

<ctrl>+<alt>+<del> to get Lock, Switch User, and Sign Out menu.
WIN+L locks the computer immediately.

nekrosoft13
03-14-12, 11:05 AM
Well, after some time with this, I have to say I believe removing the orb was a huge mistake.

It's just not an efficient start menu for the average user.

Bingo

TheOneAndOnly
03-14-12, 11:13 AM
WIN+I, <up arrow>, <enter> brings you to the Sleep, Shutdown, Reset menu.
Just <up arrow> again to your choice.

<ctrl>+<alt>+<del> to get Lock, Switch User, and Sign Out menu.
WIN+L locks the computer immediately.

Yeah, that sure sounds easy enough for Grandma to do... :lol:

I showed it to another IT tech yesterday. Only took him 5 minutes to find the shutdown menu. Your average casual user ought to have loads of fun finding that in the "Settings" charm :rolleyes:

TheOneAndOnly
03-14-12, 11:34 AM
Well, after some time with this, I have to say I believe removing the orb was a huge mistake. It isn't that anything is difficult to find or use, it's that nothing about this interface is intuitive at all.

Considering that they are trying to jam in two entirely different OS's into one, why would it be more intuitive? Thats the part I have trouble discerning. It makes no sense to do so.

Everything from installation to configuring multiple monitors was reasonably painless, and everything about this OS from file transfers to extracting just seems snappier and smoother.

Metro has a good deal of functionality from reviews I've read, but using them just doesn't feel right - maybe it will grow on me, but I don't think so.

It's just not an efficient start menu for the average user.

I like the internal fixes that they have implemented. The new taskbar, file transfers, storage options, all sound great. But in the meantime, other than a few new functions and tweaks, the classic desktop feels like no more than a SP1.
And yes, the removal of the start button will confuse many, even experienced windows users. Why they are trying to alienate 90% of those who will use this OS (non-touch users) is beyond me. They are once again trying to copy Apple in all the wrong ways... as usual :(

Many people believe that Apple is merging the OSX and iOS UI's. That could not be farther from the truth. While they are adding iOS apps and gestures to OSX, they are only doing so where it makes sense. And yes, I hate the new calendar and address book skins. But the gestures are entirely an alternative method, not required. Other than that, there is little change in the OSX UI and workflow.
Mac, iPhone and iPad all have different interfaces which work for them, even if there are some similarities where they make sense. And people do not have a problem using them, because they take advantage of the uses for that particular device.
But MS mistakenly believes Apple will eventually merge OSX in iOS to be the One OS for Apple. And so they are apparently trying to beat them to the punch.
In essence, they are going to end going where the puck never will.

BTW, for those that do not know, I use Windows XP/7 at work, Window 7 and sometimes Lion at home, along with iPad 2 and iPhone 4. But I am primarily a Windows user due to games and windows apps that I use. I primarily use my Mac for hobbyist photo and multimedia work.
I am also an IT hardware/software support tech, both a contractor at a major corporation, as well as owning a business supporting home users and small businesses. So I would like to disabuse some of you of the notion that I am an Apple fanboy. I love using Windows 7, and have been a windows user since Windows 2.0. I should also tell you that by my typical usages and experience, I am not against using different OS's and UI's.
However, this release I am likely skipping, although I may run it in a VM just to keep up with the eventual support calls I will be receiving. And if they decide to stay with Metro on the Desktop, then I may be forced to move more of my work to the Mac.
I have not been so disapointed with Microsoft since Windows ME came along. And that was only a temporary glitch soon to be ignored. Hopefully the same can be said of Windows 8 and Metro on the desktop computer.

Melfranks
03-14-12, 11:52 AM
Yeah, that sure sounds easy enough for Grandma to do... :lol:

Just sharing some simple shortcuts with Cylphid, not sure what grandma has to do with it.

I showed it to another IT tech yesterday. Only took him 5 minutes to find the shutdown menu. Your average casual user ought to have loads of fun finding that in the "Settings" charm :rolleyes:

This isn't going to be some "find the options with no guidance, good luck" game at release, there will be getting started tutorials.
Two minutes explaining the corner hot spots and its simple from there.
This idea that everyone is a complete moron and wont get it is absurd.

Cylphid
03-14-12, 02:44 PM
Considering that they are trying to jam in two entirely different OS's into one, why would it be more intuitive? Thats the part I have trouble discerning. It makes no sense to do so.
I couldn't agree more. My hope is a refinement by RC time that someone who has no computer skills to speak of will be able to just look at and figure out easily, I'll post a good example down below.

I like the internal fixes that they have implemented. The new taskbar, file transfers, storage options, all sound great. But in the meantime, other than a few new functions and tweaks, the classic desktop feels like no more than a SP1.
And yes, the removal of the start button will confuse many, even experienced windows users. Why they are trying to alienate 90% of those who will use this OS (non-touch users) is beyond me. They are once again trying to copy Apple in all the wrong ways... as usual :(


Yes...nothing to add there :lol:


Just sharing some simple shortcuts with Cylphid, not sure what grandma has to do with it.



This isn't going to be some "find the options with no guidance, good luck" game at release, there will be getting started tutorials.
Two minutes explaining the corner hot spots and its simple from there.
This idea that everyone is a complete moron and wont get it is absurd.

Thanks for the tips. I guess a better way to clarify my position is this. I work both home and business end users (I'm not an IT, but somewhat related) and field huge amounts of questions about simple configurations (how do I find my IP address, just switched to cable from DSL and can't get online)...that sort of thing, very simple stuff if you know where to look.

I installed Win 7 on a good friends laptop a while back and she dove right in, no issues coming from XP other than "this looks different" :lol:

I had shown her a Ubuntu install (Gnome desktop) some time ago, as well as an open suse DT, and again, she had it all figured and was doing her thing within 5 minutes.

I sat her in front of the preview at the log in screen (the initial screen you have to move) last night. She clicked everywhere, rt clicked, hit escape etc...I finally showed her how to move it and log in.

Up comes Metro. She clicked on the desktop, opened ie, browsed a second, and asked me what to do. I showed her the charm bar, keyboard shortcuts etc.

Instant hate :lol: She's quite intelligent, a bit better schooled than *many* of the home users I work with, and wants absolutely nothing more to do with it. Too clunky and hard to use, she says.

I hope they streamline a lot of the interface for PC users prior to release, I really do. It's the average, non forum browsing, non geeky types I'm thinking of, and the pain they will cause myself and the more educated in PC related fields.

Cylphid
03-14-12, 05:48 PM
Just got this email, probably along with a lot of you. I laughed, and cringed, at the bolded part.

Experience Windows 8
Thank you for being one of the first to try the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Itís Windows reimagined and reinvented.

Learn how to personalize your experience, download and pin apps, and master the new language of touch. And get the in-depth Consumer Preview product guide.


Don't these goons realize most PCs do not have touch screens?