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PCjunkie
03-27-04, 06:26 PM
How much does liquid nitrogen cooling system cost??

are there more cheaper and more effective cooling techniques?

jAkUp
03-27-04, 06:32 PM
Liquid Nitrogen??!!!! Your better off buying a Top of the line Alienware :D

saturnotaku
03-27-04, 10:19 PM
are there more cheaper and more effective cooling techniques?

Yeah, a stock heatsink and fan tied to a faster processor with dual-channel DDR memory running at a full 200 MHz or greater front side bus.

ninelven
03-27-04, 10:33 PM
Well, watercooling of course...

zer0xp
03-28-04, 12:11 AM
that's gonna cost you a lot, cause i think you're gonna have to have a running supply of liquid nitrogen...should be high maintenance also.. I'd say you're better off getting a really good heatsink and fan combo, or just get a watercooling kit... If you want to get more cooling than that, you can always get a TEC unit, though it could be a little risky..

NickSpolec
03-28-04, 02:39 AM
Try 50/20 synthetic motor oil, sure to give you better results.

B&R
03-28-04, 03:24 AM
Water cooling.

I'd stick to air cooling as much as possible thou.

zakelwe
03-28-04, 06:14 AM
How much does liquid nitrogen cooling system cost??

are there more cheaper and more effective cooling techniques?

1) You have to make your own, so the cost is variable.

2) Yes, everything is if you are running 24/7

3) How do you mean more effective ? LN2 gets coldest but is very tricky to use and nobody uses it for more than getting a screen shot or doing a run or two on a bench.

It all depends on what your are using it for, I would say that for reducing fan noise water is best, but for best guarranteed overclocks order phase change, they are getting somewhat cheaper and better thought out.

Regards

Andy

MUYA
03-28-04, 06:43 AM
if u really wanna spend the bigbucks

head on over to asetek's website for phase coolling or Prometria's website cooling

Rollo
03-28-04, 09:11 AM
Back in the day they used to use "peltier" coolers for OCing? Is that pretty much extinct?

zakelwe
03-28-04, 09:20 AM
Back in the day they used to use "peltier" coolers for OCing? Is that pretty much extinct?

Actually no, they are pretty inefficient at very cold temps but if you have water already and say running -5C - to +10C then the Peltier can be a cheap upgrade to get down to -20C or more. The problem with Pelts is normally you are trying to remove the heat of the cpu/gpu and also the Pelt, so air cooling does not really cut it and the heat from the Pelt hot side seeps back to the cold side. With water you can get rid of this energy more easily.

I am planning on running one this summer, but of you have lots of money then MUYA's post makes the most sense to be honest. Shame there are only two company's mainly involved and both have had a few hiccups recently.

Regards

Andy

DaveW
03-28-04, 09:58 AM
Even super computers don't use liquid nitrogen. The ideal liquid is one that absorbs as much heat as possible. Its called freon.

saturnotaku
03-28-04, 10:03 AM
Would the more environmentally friendly R134A refrigerant work as well? That's what automakers used to replace freon in their air conditioning systems.

AthlonXP1800
03-28-04, 11:55 AM
Soon you will be forget about used stock heatsinks, liquid nitrogen cooling, heatpipe heatsinks and watercooling.

Later this year we could see Ion Cooling (http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/other/display/20040326082724.html) using nano-lighting, if the experiment goes well and get best results in next few months, companies like Cooler Master will use this technology to create new ion cooling products will be on sales later this year. :)

MUYA
03-28-04, 11:58 AM
that will take more than a few years of research :D