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Jarred
05-27-04, 01:25 PM
Has anyone seen them for the new gen of cards?

Morrow
05-27-04, 02:24 PM
Not yet but I think the reason for this is because the nv40GL card has not yet been released.

I'm also eagerly awaiting the next-generation quadro benches because I'm currently using 3ds max.

Jarred
05-27-04, 02:32 PM
Not yet but I think the reason for this is because the nv40GL card has not yet been released.

I'm also eagerly awaiting the next-generation quadro benches because I'm currently using 3ds max.

quadro's are great for 3dapps, I do'nt even think Ati can compete in that arena, but their not so great playing games, I got a quadro 2000 here at work and in some games theres wierd artifacting, not bad enough to make the games unplayable, but enough to notice. Most games run fine though. The framerates also seem to be VERY close to the same with games.

I need something thats kinda all around good card for both, and so far game cards have held out for me.

Besides, the quadro's are really expensive.

sorry this post should probably be in the benchmark section

RobHague
05-27-04, 02:58 PM
quadro's are great for 3dapps, I do'nt even think Ati can compete in that ..............

That's true :( but i think mainly due to ATI's drivers. The Quadro drivers are so well polished now that they make the hardware shine (especially with OGL) adn ATI just havent gotten it right yet in the professional arena.

I used to own a Quadro2 MXR :D damn that was the worst buy i ever made lol. I 'previously' had a Geforce256, and saw the Quadro2 MXR on sale - so silly me bought one. Only to find out that my moded Geforce256 > Quadro256 outperformed the proper Quadro2 MXR in everything. I later discovered that the MXR is based on the Geforce2 MX, as in NUTED geforce2 so then i realised why.. :( but anyway thats unrelated so nevermind :o

I'm not sure what the next line of Quadro and FireGL cards will hold - maybe ATI can catch up a little.

Morrow
05-27-04, 07:55 PM
That's true :( but i think mainly due to ATI's drivers. The Quadro drivers are so well polished now that they make the hardware shine (especially with OGL) adn ATI just havent gotten it right yet in the professional arena.

There is no doubt that Quadros are leagues ahead of FireGL cards and the reason I say that is not because I think that ATI produces bad performing cards (they are not!) but the reason is quite simply because ATI is currently not interesting in the professional market. They don't care about producing cards which perform well in professional 3d apps because the gaming segment is everything ATI is interesting in for the time being. Hopefully this will change soon.

I think that the reason Quadros outperform FireGL cards in 3d apps is 50% due to the great drivers (and this not only in OpenGL but also in D3D which I'm currently using with 3ds max 5.1 SP1) and 50% due to the hardware. In contrast to ATI, nvidia designs their "gaming" hardware also with professional 3d apps in mind.

Part of the decision to add long shader support into the nv3x architecture was because of 3d apps and NOT because of games. It's of uttermost importance to have pseudo unlimited shader instructions support in 3d apps for developpers even if the performance is sub-par. This is exactly what nvidia did with the nv30 and greatly enhanced with the nv40. This is also one of the main disadvantages of FireGL cards and I really hope ATI will understand this soon for its own sake.

Jarred
05-27-04, 08:03 PM
There is no doubt that Quadros are leagues ahead of FireGL cards and the reason I say that is not because I think that ATI produces bad performing cards (they are not!) but the reason is quite simply because ATI is currently not interesting in the professional market. They don't care about producing cards which perform well in professional 3d apps because the gaming segment is currently everything ATI is interesting in. Hopefully this will change soon.

I think that the reason Quadros outperform FireGL cards in 3d apps is 50% due to the great drivers (and this not only in OpenGL but also in D3D which I'm currently using with 3ds max 5.1 SP1) and 50% due to the hardware. In contrast to ATI, nvidia designs their "gaming" hardware also with professional 3d apps in mind.

Part of the decision to add long shader support into the nv3x architecture was because of 3d apps and NOT because of games. It's of uttermost importance to have pseudo unlimited shader instructions support in 3d apps for developpers even if the performance is sub-par. This is exactly what nvidia did with the nv30 and greatly enhanced with the nv40. This is also one of the main disadventages of FireGL cards and I really hope ATI will understand this soon for its own sake.

I agree, I think Nvidia has a pretty good stratagey by supporting not only the gamers but the developers.