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View Full Version : Realtime Raytracing at 20FPS on Quake 3.


poursoul
06-08-04, 02:30 PM
Go here:

http://games.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/06/07/2350243&mode=thread&tid=112&tid=127&tid=152&tid=185&tid=186&tid=206

for screenshots and a movie.

SH64
06-08-04, 02:49 PM
All i can say ... WOW!

any word on the video card used to run this ??

Clay
06-08-04, 03:07 PM
Very interesting, thanks for the link!

poursoul
06-08-04, 03:09 PM
i wanna know the software used to hook these systems up. maybe get my hands on that, i got a couple of systems laying around and would like to run some games faster.

Clay
06-08-04, 03:10 PM
any word on the video card used to run this ??
Doesn't seem to say, but they do make this statement mentioning GeForce hardware:

More complex geometry can be used. The framerate scales only O(log n) with the number of triangles. In rasterization (ala GeForce) this is O(n).

Edge
06-08-04, 03:13 PM
Hmm, doesn't look too bad, though obviously the performance is abysmal for effects which are replicated much faster on regular hardware. Still, a very impressive feat, and while the configuration they used will probably take around 5 years to become mainstream, that gap will be very quickly filled by video card capabilities. Oh, and from the sound of it, it was just software mode (since 512x512 is such an odd resolution, though under the Quake 3 engine I'm wondering how they got past the OpenGL requirement...maybe they emulate OpenGL while they're at it?). Though it's of little use in practical gaming applications (imagine getting a game with a requirement of a 40 ghz processor :D), it is a very cool to look at. Certainly runs faster than when I do raytrace rendering in Lightwave ;)

SH64
06-08-04, 03:28 PM
"But it is sooooo slow?" you may ask...

The solution for fast raytracing is a real hardware capable of raytracing. Saarland University is working on a prototype. It is clocked with 90 MHz and has the raytrace power similiar to a virtual P4-12 GHz. The prototype uses only one pipeline, parallelization can be done. Also more GPUs can be used on one card.

heh .. & i thought my P4:3.4 is fast as hell .

some more info about thier prototype & more screenshots for games with RT like UT2003 here :
http://www.saarcor.de/

http://graphics.cs.uni-sb.de/~jofis/SaarCOR/DynRT/SaarCOR-HW_with_description.jpg

CaptNKILL
06-08-04, 05:47 PM
Wow, that is pretty cool :D

Itd be amazing if it had soft lighting and shadows, but thatd probably take another 20Ghz :p

Vash
06-08-04, 06:14 PM
Man, I gotta wait till I get home to see this thing... sounds like a treat, though.

sytaylor
06-09-04, 03:12 AM
Wow that video is incredible, it looks to do pretty much all of Unreal 3's tricks only using raytracing instead of shaders. I'd be interested to see what hardware created specefically for raytracing can do.

Morrow
06-09-04, 07:05 AM
All i can say ... WOW!

any word on the video card used to run this ??

it's done mostly in software, no hardware acceleration through current graphiccards (ATI as nvidia) since those cards do scanline rendering and not raytracing.

Pafet
06-09-04, 09:23 AM
WOW! That hardware simulation movie (http://www.saarcor.de/gallery_sim.html) is amazing.If that card is supposed to do that in RT than it's something to look forward to :D

BTW something is very wrong with that music :eek:

gmontem
06-09-04, 10:12 AM
Oh, and from the sound of it, it was just software mode (since 512x512 is such an odd resolution, though under the Quake 3 engine I'm wondering how they got past the OpenGL requirement...maybe they emulate OpenGL while they're at it?).
What OpenGL requirement? What Quake 3 engine? The Quake 3 source isn't freely available yet and I doubt these guy will spend the $$$ to buy it for their what appears to be a non-profit project. The engine was written from scratch and uses a raytracing API. Whatever video card was used was probably used only for displaying the final 2D image.

The game engine was written from scratch and supports player and bot movement including shooting and jumping, collision detection, and many sepcial effects like jump-pads and teleporters. The main development was done by Daniel Pohl in less than six months with contribution for shading by several other students (see feature list). The engine builds upon the OpenRT-API, which manages the ray tracing.

Kamel
06-09-04, 12:35 PM
heh, at first i thought you said ray casting... which is (iirc) the original doom gaming engine, lol.

to those who don't know, raytracing is a technique that high quality rendering software uses today (bryce 3d, maya, 3d studio max, etc) which creates the most accurate lighting/reflections possible, but it takes a while to render (on my old p3 it would take a good 15 minutes for any of those sceens, if not more). the idea is that it calculates (traces) every ray of light from every pixel to its destination, in order to figure out where it belong; so the more light reflects (even if it isn't seen on the screen sometimes), the longer it takes to render... i'm pretty sure i'm right about this, but i could be wrong, so please don't scald me, lol. (it's been years since i've learned about rendering etc.)

Edge
06-10-04, 01:41 AM
Yeah, that's pretty much how it goes. Though technically real raytracing is infinant: the light beams never really stop, they just keep going until they hit something that's a truely absorbant color. But usually when rendering for 3d animation it will only trace to the 20th or so hop, since it's very difficult to notice any difference past even 5 hops. Wonder how many times this program will reflect light...probably only one or two light bounces, I'm guessing.

sytaylor
06-10-04, 02:55 AM
What OpenGL requirement? What Quake 3 engine? The Quake 3 source isn't freely available yet and I doubt these guy will spend the $$$ to buy it for their what appears to be a non-profit project. The engine was written from scratch and uses a raytracing API. Whatever video card was used was probably used only for displaying the final 2D image.

If you look on the video it says "Thanks to id for the Quake 3 engine"

Mullins1060
06-10-04, 05:34 AM
links dead :(

gmontem
06-10-04, 10:00 AM
If you look on the video it says "Thanks to id for the Quake 3 engine"
I suppose we'll have to wait for their FAQ for this. If you look at the main page it says "The game engine was written from scratch and supports player and bot movement...."

Edge
06-10-04, 10:14 AM
So it was written from scratch...but it uses the Quake 3 engine...makes perfect sense :rolleyes: . Actually I'm guessing they used the Quake 3 code and models/levels as a base, and then wrote their own renderer. It definatly doesn't seem to have the physics of the Quake 3 engine, just look at the way the person jumps. So I guess they weren't using actual OpenGL for 3d acceleration then. Though that does make me wonder why they rendered it at 512x512 with 4xAA if the whole thing was in software mode then, if they disabled AA wouldn't it theoretically run 4 times faster? Unless they used edge-AA or something other than Supersample AA.