PDA

View Full Version : Custom resolutions in Windows and games


MikeC
07-21-04, 07:29 PM
One of the features in NVIDIA's ForceWare drivers that I find especially useful are custom resolutions. I have a 21-inch Sony E540 monitor and normally use a desktop resolution of 1280x960 with a refresh rate of 85Hz. While I can increase the resolution to the standard setting of 1600x1200, I find that even on a 21-inch monitor text becomes difficult to read.

With NVIDIA's ForceWare drivers, I can create higher custom resolutions, which are derived from the normal 1280x960 resolution I use.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_1.png

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_2.png

For example, I can increase the amount of desktop real estate by multiplying the horizontal and vertical pixel values by the following percentages in order to define custom resolutions:

Baseline - 1280x960

+ 5% - Baseline x 1.05 = 1344x1088

+ 7.5% - Baseline x 1.075 = 1376x1032

+ 10% - Baseline x 1.10 = 1408x1056

+12.5% - Baseline x 1.125 = 1440x1080

Another benefit of creating custom resolutions is that they may show up as selections in games. The following is an example from Morrowind.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_3.jpg

Should you decide to experiement with custom resolutions, be sure to read NVIDIA's Display Properties User's Guide first:

http://download.nvidia.com/Windows/61.76/ForceWare_Release_60_Graphics_Display_Property_Use rs_Guide.pdf

Choosing a mode that is inappropriate for your display may cause severe display problems and could damage your hardware. You may also need to make use of the Advanced Timing in order to get the custom resolution to work properly on your monitor.

Sazar
07-21-04, 07:31 PM
would it be possible for you to run some benches in a coupla games with custom res's? and show potential IQ differences and performance gains resulting from tweaked res's mike? with and without AA/AF...

:)

keep up the good work :thumbsup:

ChrisRay
07-21-04, 07:32 PM
I have but one question about this Mike. Its concerning the refresh rates of this custom resolution.

How does the monitor/graphic card know how to handle the refresh rate its giving? i wouldnt want to end up with a odd resolution with a refresh rate that will damage my monitor.

rewt
07-21-04, 07:37 PM
Nice! nVidia rocks with all its driver features. I'm currently using the 61.76 Forceware/3D Stereo combo :) Also using RT and Coolbits 2 for extra tweaks.

MikeC
07-21-04, 08:43 PM
would it be possible for you to run some benches in a coupla games with custom res's? and show potential IQ differences and performance gains resulting from tweaked res's mike? with and without AA/AF...

:)

keep up the good work :thumbsup:

Thanks. I'll put that on my to-do list :) Right now I'm getting ready for Doom 3. I want to develop a tweak guide like I did for Quake 3. Something like this - http://www.nvnews.net/tweaks/quake3_tuneup.shtml

MikeC
07-21-04, 09:00 PM
I have but one question about this Mike. Its concerning the refresh rates of this custom resolution.

How does the monitor/graphic card know how to handle the refresh rate its giving? i wouldnt want to end up with a odd resolution with a refresh rate that will damage my monitor.

You'll want to have a listing of the refresh rates that your monitor supports before you create custom resolutions. Even better is finding and installing an .inf file for your monitor.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_4.png

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_5.png

Then you'll know what refresh rates you'll be able to use. The monitor I have supports 85Hz at 1600x1200. I figure that any custom resolution I create lower than 1600x1200 will support 85Hz as well.

I think there are checks in the custom monitor applet that prevents certain resolutions from being created based on the supported refresh rate.

Jimi
07-21-04, 09:23 PM
One of the features in NVIDIA's ForceWare drivers that I find especially useful are custom resolutions. I have a 21-inch Sony E540 monitor and normally use a desktop resolution of 1280x960 with a refresh rate of 85Hz. While I can increase the resolution to the standard setting of 1600x1200, I find that even on a 21-inch monitor text becomes difficult to read.

With NVIDIA's ForceWare drivers, I can create higher custom resolutions, which are derived from the normal 1280x960 resolution I use.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_1.png

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_2.png

For example, I can increase the amount of desktop real estate by multiplying the horizontal and vertical pixel values by the following percentages in order to define custom resolutions:

Baseline - 1280x960

+ 5% - Baseline x 1.05 = 1344x1088

+ 7.5% - Baseline x 1.075 = 1376x1032

+ 10% - Baseline x 1.10 = 1408x1056

+12.5% - Baseline x 1.125 = 1440x1103

Another benefit of creating custom resolutions is that they may show up as selections in games. The following is an example from Morrowind.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_3.jpg

Should you decide to experiement with custom resolutions, be sure to read NVIDIA's Display Properties User's Guide first:

http://download.nvidia.com/Windows/61.76/ForceWare_Release_60_Graphics_Display_Property_Use rs_Guide.pdf

Choosing a mode that is inappropriate for your display may cause severe display problems and could damage your hardware. You may also need to make use of the Advanced Timing in order to get the custom resolution to work properly on your monitor.

All,

An important thing to note with most games is that they hard code the resolutions and color depths they support. The correct way for games to decide what resolutions to support is to actually query the driver resolution table for what is supports.

Unfortuantely most of us games are left with no help since application developers do not code their games correctly, so don't blame NVIDIA :)

hoop
07-21-04, 10:31 PM
can you tell me whats the best refresh rate to set my monitor to and i am at 1280 by 1024 at 75 but i wanna try to go higher in resolution tho.O i have a 19.1 viewable lcd flat screen.

saturnotaku
07-21-04, 11:02 PM
can you tell me whats the best refresh rate to set my monitor to and i am at 1280 by 1024 at 75 but i wanna try to go higher in resolution tho.O i have a 19.1 viewable lcd flat screen.

That might be as high as that display supports. What is the exact brand/model of LCD? And with an LCD, you want to avoid running it at resolutions other than its native one because there will be pixel interpolation and the display will look bad.

ChrisRay
07-21-04, 11:02 PM
You'll want to have a listing of the refresh rates that your monitor supports before you create custom resolutions. Even better is finding and installing an .inf file for your monitor.

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_4.png

http://www.nvnews.net/images/news/200407/custom_5.png

Then you'll know what refresh rates you'll be able to use. The monitor I have supports 85Hz at 1600x1200. I figure that any custom resolution I create lower than 1600x1200 will support 85Hz as well.

I think there are checks in the custom monitor applet that prevents certain resolutions from being created based on the supported refresh rate.

Thats what I was thinking. Mine supports 75 Hz @ 1280x1024 and 85Hz @ 102x768, So I am assuming if I stay above 72 Hz I should "be" fine if I stay under 1280x0124.

vonglank
08-28-04, 04:29 PM
What about a refresh rate that gets checked in coolbits, and results in a black screen with no post info, and no way to reset w/out putting a pci card in to see whats going on with the machine?How do you get back a useful AGP slot?I have tried installing new drivers(56.72's,61.77's),restore to a point before installing coolbits , and all other things such as safe mode(vga load,etc),putting card into other machine(its fine in another mach.) I am stumped so far with this one-

Any help appreciated by someone with a similiar prob-

bmg
09-15-04, 03:15 PM
This is great info. I've found 1440x1080 to be a great compromise resolution when 1600x1200 is just a bit slow. It can boost framerate by almost 25%.