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View Full Version : How Do I Repair a Windows File That Is Corrupted Or Missing?


GamerGuyX
08-17-04, 07:14 PM
Man, I am having the worst time with my new PC that I built. This time after I installed the newest drivers to my video card and restarted. I got this message upon boot-up:



Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM
You can attempt to repair this file by starting windows setup using the original setup CD-ROM, select 'r' at the first screen to start repair.



I gotta be honest. I have never really had anything like this happen to me. I don't exactly know exactly what I am suppose to do. Can somebody help me?

PsychoSy
08-18-04, 08:15 AM
Another potential method is after WindowsXP is installed and you're at your desktop, put your WinXP CD in the drive and cancel out of the "Blue" pop-up screen. Next, click Start then Run. In the command line box, type the following

$:\i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons (subtitute $ for the drive letter of your CD-Rom)

A few moments later, a pop-up box should appear describing that you're about the install the Windows Recovery Console. Click "Yes" through the dialog boxed. After that is finished, when you reboot your PC, you'll have two options at bootup -- one to boot into WindowsXP and another to boot directly to the Recovery Console. With the Recovery Console, you can enable and disable services, format drives, read and write data on a local drive (including drives that are formatted to use the NTFS file system), and perform many other administrative tasks. The Recovery Console is particularly useful if you have to repair your computer by copying a file from a disk or CD-ROM to your hard disk (or to install a hacked "uxtheme.dll" that'll enable third-party desktop themes and styles), or if you have to reconfigure a service that is preventing your computer from starting correctly. Plus, with it installed on the harddrive as a boot option, it elminates booting to the Recovery Console from the WindowsXP CD (which typically asks for a floppy disk).

Which ever way you go will probably work out for you! :)

However, if you keep getting this (or other) corruptions, I would suspect flaky RAM or IDE Drivers/Cable. :D

GamerGuyX
08-18-04, 02:16 PM
Well I think my hard drive is broken. Now, in windows setup it says that it cannot access the disk (WTF). And it takes like, 20 minutes just to get to the windows setup screen where it tells me it cannot access the disk (even though it is sensed in the bios) Well I guess I gotta return it to Newegg and wait a week for a replacement... so much for my vacation...

Diamond_G
08-18-04, 09:38 PM
you will need your sata driver disk and when it loads press f6 for third party drivers.... windows doens't recognize sata natively....

GamerGuyX
08-18-04, 10:11 PM
you will need your sata driver disk and when it loads press f6 for third party drivers.... windows doens't recognize sata natively....

Here's the thing, I had the computer working fine for a couple days.

And also, I thought I only had to press F6 for only if I wanted a SATA RAID setup. Because I never pressed F6 when I had my computer running before. Could this be related to why my hard drive is now broken?

WeReWoLf
08-25-04, 12:58 AM
I get these problems quite often. It usually means i've got hardly any power, I've installed a new piece of hardware that windows doesn't recognise, or windows is just f#cked. It's not a dead hard drive issue.

GamerGuyX
08-25-04, 10:12 AM
I get these problems quite often. It usually means i've got hardly any power, I've installed a new piece of hardware that windows doesn't recognise, or windows is just f#cked. It's not a dead hard drive issue.

Yeah, well I already RMA'd the hard drive. I am using an old 5200 RPM :lame: hard drive while I wait for my replacement.