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Eltigre88
11-11-04, 04:33 AM
Of all the metals on the earth what is the best material for heat transfer? What is stopping someone from going to your local machine shop and handing them the reference heat sink and saying hey I want this made out of this? Is brass better than copper? Is titanium better than aluminum? Lets not get retarded on this thread. I'm not going to get a solid gold heat sink, but I will have one made if it is of reasonable material cost. I'm willing to experiment with a 100 bucks. Let me know what all you brains think! Thanks!!

crainger
11-11-04, 04:40 AM
Well I would assume its Copper, the metal that most are already made out of. Sure there are other metals that could work better, but they are not used for other reasons. For example the metal may be to soft to work with, way to expensive, things like that.

I don't really know much in this area, but the above is what I've read in alot of PC Tech mags, like Atomic, one of the best. (mag)

Oh shouldn't this be in General Hardware or the CPU thread??

Eltigre88
11-11-04, 04:45 AM
I'm interested in the heat sink for my PNY geforce 6800 Ultra. I already own the best CPU cooler on the market. If the big dogs want to move it they can. I wanted to pick the brains of the gaming guys on this forum first and this is why I posted here.

ChrisRay
11-11-04, 05:07 AM
Well I would assume its Copper, the metal that most are already made out of. Sure there are other metals that could work better, but they are not used for other reasons. For example the metal may be to soft to work with, way to expensive, things like that.

I don't really know much in this area, but the above is what I've read in alot of PC Tech mags, like Atomic, one of the best. (mag)

Oh shouldn't this be in General Hardware or the CPU thread??

Copper conducts the best. But the best at heat dissipation? not sure about that. Not an expert on the elements though. Keep mind. Conduction does not equal heat dissipation.

mustrum
11-11-04, 05:18 AM
It's not copper. Silver is a tiny bit better. Too expensive though and the difference is so small you wouldn't notice it. Some freaks do use CPU blocks with silver though.
Most likely there's something exotic that's even better but it's not affordabel for sure.

msxyz
11-11-04, 05:55 AM
Thermal conductivity:

Pure silver : 407 Watt/Kelvin
Copper : 386
Aluminum : 204

YOGIx213
11-11-04, 06:32 AM
Hey Eltigre!

You thinking of getting the eVGA copper heatsink for your GT? If so, I highly recommend it. I won it in their contest giveaway for the 6800 Ultra and I installed it easily on my PNY 6800 Ultra. It dropped my temps on average about 8-10 degrees. It use to idle at around 63c and it's now at around 51-53c. It's a good alternative to NV5 silencer (not saying it's better or anything since I have not tried it) but there are so few choices for alternative cooling solutions, this simple heatsink works great.

Chippy
11-11-04, 06:33 AM
At higher temperatures, liquid Sodium is phenomenally good at heat transfer. Though a bit hot and not very practical for use in a PC, LOL.

But seriously, it is very very good. That's why - despite its obvious handling and safety issues - they still use it as the coolant in the old Magnox nuclear reactors.

The things you learn on these forums!

Chip

|MaguS|
11-11-04, 06:54 AM
carbon, diamond = 895 k (W/mK)
carbon, graphite (∥) = 1950 k (W/mK)

Imagine having a Heatsink made of Diamon?! How much would that cost to make? LOL

jolle
11-11-04, 07:10 AM
Was just about to mention diamond.
There is work being done on making diamondbased CPUs acctually, they have transistors running at 81Ghz last i heard.. from 2003.
http://www.geek.com/news/geeknews/2003Aug/gee20030827021485.htm
Already, experimental diamond transistors have been clocked at 81GHz.
Researchers at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp. (NTT) have set their sights on a transistor that runs at 200GHz while dissipating 30W/mm, and they believe impurities are the only thing holding them back. Apollo's process would remove even that barrier, making the purest diamond physically possible.

Artificial diamonds treated with Boron to make them conductive.
Maybe heatsinks could be affordable aswell with large enough scale manufacturing of artificial diamonds..

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/diamond.html

Eltigre88
11-11-04, 07:15 AM
Hey Eltigre!

You thinking of getting the eVGA copper heatsink for your GT? If so, I highly recommend it. I won it in their contest giveaway for the 6800 Ultra and I installed it easily on my PNY 6800 Ultra. It dropped my temps on average about 8-10 degrees. It use to idle at around 63c and it's now at around 51-53c. It's a good alternative to NV5 silencer (not saying it's better or anything since I have not tried it) but there are so few choices for alternative cooling solutions, this simple heatsink works great.

I put in for the same contest but did not win of course. I suck at bingo too; anyway. Yes I will head over to there website and pick one up. 17 bucks is no too bad. I think the arctic silver will help alot too. Although the carbon, graphite (∥) = 1950 k (W/mK) would be cool wonder how much a small block would cost?

Zelda_fan
11-11-04, 07:18 AM
I think platinum and silver are both better than copper, but it's not link you can go down to your local hardware store and buy a heatsink made out of that.

MustangSVT
11-11-04, 08:06 AM
As someone else said, Platinum is also probably very good, but it's more than $1000 per oz. as far as I know. Now diamond and graphite would be interesting to read about.

Another possibility is Unobtainium. Made from tugsten and titanium, that thing resists up to 10,000C+ and converts heat to energy. You could use the heat as a GPU. Think of all the possibilities. Now if only we could get the earth's core to stop so we can build it. :retard:

zoomy942
11-11-04, 08:58 AM
my vote is for KRYPTONITE! go get 'em superman

theultimo
11-11-04, 09:31 AM
I LIKE GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLLLLL LLDDDD!

Gold is great too.

harl
11-11-04, 09:56 AM
I read somewere that gold it's worst than silver in heat dissipation.

a heatskin made of silver & diamonds?

heatskin or crown?

Anyway

carbon, diamond = 895 k (W/mK)
carbon, graphite (||) = 1950 k (W/mK)


graphite seems better (and its cheap)
unfortunately it's not consistent enugh ...

Zetto
11-11-04, 03:21 PM
Not in aircooling, but in watercooling ppl go at all kinds of extremes

Diamond waterblock
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=15883

Silver waterblock - teh best on the market
http://www.procooling.com/reviews/html/storm_g5_waterblock_review_-_1.php

NoWayDude
11-11-04, 03:40 PM
I LIKE GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLLLLL LLDDDD!

Gold is great too.

What?Bling Bling on my Pc?No Way.
Now if someone could work something with carbon graphite.....

Jethro
11-11-04, 03:51 PM
Copper and Alu type heatsinks IMO are the best. Copper is very good at absorbing heat while the alu is much better at dissapation. The AX-7 is a good example of this combo and its performance was astounding with even a very quiet fan.

Chippy
11-11-04, 04:01 PM
Copper is very good at absorbing heat while the alu is much better at dissapation.

Sorry to burst your balloon, but from a Physics point of view, the above statement is complete hogwash.

Chip
(BSc. (Hons) Physics, Imperial College London)

einstein_314
11-11-04, 04:03 PM
Sorry to burst your balloon, but from a Physics point of view, the above statement is complete hogwash.

Chip
(BSc. (Hons) Physics, Imperial College London)

owned:

Jethro
11-11-04, 04:07 PM
Im sure your right. I dont have a degree but i know if i heat up a alu heatsink and a copper heatsink it seems like the copper one stays hot for much longer. Why is that?

Jethro
11-11-04, 04:16 PM
ig. 7 shows the thermal performances of the four heatsink combinations for the distributed heat source. The all-copper (Cu base-Cu fin) heatsink had the lowest thermal resistance with 17% average reduction in thermal resistance as compared to the all-aluminum sink. Up to 14% reduction in thermal resistance was achieved by using an aluminum base/copper fin sink. Meanwhile, the relatively light copper base/aluminum fin heatsink provided a marginal reduction in thermal resistance of 3% compared to the all-aluminum sink. For high source coverage, it can be concluded that the high conductive material is more efficient when it is used as fin material rather than using it as base material.

Copper heatsinks improve thermal performance more than 22% for a concentrated heat source and 17% for a distributed heat source. We can conclude that the high conductive material is more efficient when used as fin material rather than using it as base material for both concentrated and distributed heat sources. The thermal performance improves 9% for concentrated source and up to 14% for distributed source.

The high thermally conductive material in the baseplate is a good option for concentrated heat source. In this case, copper helps spread the heat across the base to reduce the temperature rise near the heat source. In weight-sensitive applications, use heat pipes as an alternative to copper for heat spreading in the base.


Copper/ALu can perform very well, wiegh less and are cheaper of course but not better.



well i learned something anyway :)http://powerelectronics.com/mag/power_characterizing_mixedmetal_heatsinks/

Jethro
11-11-04, 04:27 PM
There are longstanding myths about this all over im finding! Interesting reading here:

http://www.overclockers.com/articles223/index02.asp

Quote: It is true that, in general, aluminum will radiate heat better than copper but radiation is such a miniscule part of heat transfer in a computer system as to be deemed completely inapplicable.

Jethro
11-11-04, 04:45 PM
You can find an abundance of reviews of copper alu heatsinks that have the reviewer coming to similar conclusions lol. Interesting anyway.


http://www.viperlair.com/reviews/cooling/air/swiftech/mcx/6400v/index.shtml

Quote:

As with their previous heatsinks, the MCX6400-V is composed of aluminum pins and a thick copper base. There are helicoid pins fitted into the base, which addresses the heat dissipation weakness of copper. As we've mentioned in the past, copper absorbs more heat than aluminum (great for that initial blast of heat when powering on a PC with an overclocked CPU), whereas aluminum dissipates it better. The heat moves from the copper to the aluminum, where it is cooled by a fan of your choosing.

http://www.technoyard.com/hardware/miscellaneous/Alpha-PAL8055F/page_1.html


The S-PAL8055F certainly is a very well built cooler. The base is around inch thick with a mixture of Copper and Aluminum mix. The base has a mirror polished finish, ensuring perfect contact with the CPU core. There are plenty of vertical fins protruding out of the cooler base for best heat dissipation. Having a Copper and Aluminum combination at the base is one of the best solutions for good heat dissipation since copper absorbs heat faster than aluminum and Aluminum dissipates heat the fastest. Basically you get best of both worlds.