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View Full Version : What's the deal with the WD Raptor drives?


superklye
02-22-05, 06:54 PM
I don't understand why they have such unconventional sizes? 36GB? 74GB? 150GB? Why is that? Is it due to the plates and being a 10,000RPM drive or something?

Riptide
02-22-05, 07:19 PM
In order to compete with SCSI they have to keep the costs down somehow. They are meant for a mid-range sort of server. Typically if you need a huge RAID array for a large server you should still be going U320 SCSI.

jolle
02-22-05, 07:24 PM
the speed they run prolly puts other sorts of requirements on the platters or something, restricting them a bit when it comes to size..
Dont know tho.. there is always the noise and heat factor that comes with higher RPMs, not much of a problem on SCSI drives that usually sits in servers which are kept in "server rooms" with some ventilation and noone to bother..

Small chance of ending up in "some guys old Dell" with no airflow due to dustkilled Fans clogged ventilation...

lightman
02-23-05, 04:21 AM
I don't understand why they have such unconventional sizes? 36GB? 74GB? 150GB? Why is that? Is it due to the plates and being a 10,000RPM drive or something?

They're not unconventional sizes...

You just have to keep in mind that basically, the Raptors are SCSI drives with an ATA interface. If you look at the SCSI offers, you'll see that all of them are in multiples of 18 GB and ranging from 10k to 15k rpms...

So it's not so strange for them to be sized that way... :)

Vagrant Zero
02-23-05, 04:23 AM
There's a 150 raptor?

retsam
02-23-05, 05:07 AM
There's a 150 raptor? no not yet ....

superklye
02-23-05, 11:29 AM
They're not unconventional sizes...

You just have to keep in mind that basically, the Raptors are SCSI drives with an ATA interface. If you look at the SCSI offers, you'll see that all of them are in multiples of 18 GB and ranging from 10k to 15k rpms...

So it's not so strange for them to be sized that way... :)
oh...hmmm...I wasn't aware that SCSI was like this as well.

And I read in a thread a few days ago the WD had announced 150GB Raptors for release soon.

Riptide
02-23-05, 11:40 AM
They've had 140+ GB SCSI drives out for a while now. The 150GB raptors aren't going to be cheap either - consider the 74GB models are $180. I'm guessing the 150's will be over $250. The 10,000RPM 150GB SCSI drives are still significantly more expensive though.

Holy check this out, 300GB 10,000 RPM SCSI drive (U320).
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=22-148-042&depa=1 :eek:

Nice seek time though. This is the sort of drive targeted for high end servers, not where the Raptor is really going to fit in.

jolle
02-23-05, 03:48 PM
Its not that much of an issue for home users IMO..
Put 2x 36Gb Raptors in RAID and you got a 74Gb drive you can dedicate for games and a few heavy apps..
Then get a "insert favorite brand here" 250 or 300gb disk to use as storage of whatever files you feel the urge to hoard, a movie for example isnt that criticly bound to the speed of the HD its stored on..
could chop of a partition on that bigger drive for windows aswell so it doesnt mess with the HD speed on the stuff on the Raptor raid array..

And even then the most you get out of it is shorter loading times on the games and apps on the WD raid array..

A server is another matter, you might need to keep a really large database or alot of hosted content and also need it to be really fast, so then a big SCSI Array is in order.

Rakeesh
03-05-05, 06:37 PM
Just something I thought I would add to this thread - I just had a raptor 36gb hard disk crash n burn on me. Raid 0 simply isn't worth it for these drives, the speed difference is extremely neglegable for the very high cost involved. We are talking maybe the game takes 30 seconds to load instead of 32 in a raid 0 config. Whats worse is when you are in a raid 0 configuration, you are doubling your chances of complete data loss.

A raid config does not improve the numbers that actually make a big difference for games, such as seek time. Raid is only truely effective in enterprise systems such as storing and indexing massive databases. Some people will report that they see some bigger number like a 30-50% speed increase, but that is only with benchmarking software that does sustained reads/writes of massive amounts of data - games don't do this.

BTW, this is the first time I have ever had a hard disk ever die on me (I even have an old 120 megabyte hard disk laying around from 1992 that still works.) In spite of the fact that I take extremely good care of my hard disks, this drive just didn't last. Good thing it has a 5 year warranty though.