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View Full Version : Dark Sector Trailer (Next-Gen Consoles)


jAkUp
05-09-05, 12:33 AM
http://www.3dgamers.com/news/more/1096481626/

Looks good to me, anyone know if this will land on the PC also?

Subtestube
05-09-05, 02:13 AM
Wow... that's an impressive trailer, 'specially if it's in game (which I assume it must be). The next gen consoles will far and away be the best reason I've ever seen to buy a console. Better even than Mario Kart, and that was pretty tempting.

DMA
05-09-05, 02:20 AM
Looks sweet.
I'm starting to get into E3 mood. It's gonna rain good trailers in a week. :D

"Sector Engine". I would have thought DE would use UE3 since they are Epics old buddies. :p

Superfly
05-09-05, 06:29 AM
http://www.3dgamers.com/news/more/1096481626/

Looks good to me, anyone know if this will land on the PC also?

I believe so:

Quote:

What's so special about Dark Sector?

A: Dark Sector is a first of its kind game that mixes deathmatch game play (Quake 3, Unreal Tournament) with Everquest style persistent world serving. That means you play as a character with stats and a reputation that will follow. This is definitely a cutting edge experiment in game design.

Q: Will Glide still be supported?

A: The engine is moving to D3D/OpenGL.

Q: So what are going to be the system requirements?

A: Right now the only requirement known is a 3d card, there will be no software rendering done in DS

de><ta
05-10-05, 02:23 AM
Sure looks nice. Trailer: http://www.gametrailers.com/gamepage.php?id=292

The music also was nice.

Superfly
05-10-05, 05:11 AM
check out this interview with James Smaltz: http://www.futuremark.com/news/?newsarticle=200505/2005051001#200505/2005051001

Quote:

IGN: What kind of visual effects do you expect to reap from this next generation of games? What kinds of effects are you using in Dark Sector that you couldn't use in the previous generation of consoles?

James: The next generation visuals are going to be amazing. You cannot fully appreciate Dark Sector unless it's running in true high resolution. Our technology has come a long way since that video was created. We are also still a long way from finishing Dark Sector, so we still have a lot of technology to create and add to the game. So, if you like what you see now, you will love what you see when we show it off next.

As for what effects we are using now that we couldn't before... well, I like to describe it best like this: consumer computing will inevitably be multi-processor configurations. Soon enough dual cores will be the standard in new PCs. So with a single processor system we'd allocate 15-20% to AI, perhaps double that to physics. Well, imagine now that you could allocate an entire processor to one of those tasks? That is a massive increase in performance. Just think of the physics or AI or particle effects you could create with a fast dedicated CPU. That gives developers a huge amount of freedom to explore new ideas. Developers will have more flexibility than ever.

Vagrant Zero
05-10-05, 05:22 AM
Looks like these fellas haven't heard of PPUs.

Subtestube
05-10-05, 07:40 AM
I have my doubts that PPUs will become mainstream products in the short term - perhaps given 3-4 years (assuming the industry REALLY takes to them), but it's not something that these guys can probably rely on in terms of sizeable target market. We have yet to even see how well they'll be supported - but I suppose with Epic behind them they do have a real shot at gold. Still, as I say, Dual-Core Procs are something they can rely on as becoming standard, whereas at present PPUs are an unknown quantity. I know that if I were a current developer without the raw selling power of Epic, I'd be banking on the Dual-Core Processors, and not the PPU.

Knot3D
05-10-05, 07:47 AM
I was sceptic about Dark Sector's first screenshots becuz it showed nothing but dark all-metallic content.

This trailer however, shows that with that music and the animations, it packs some nice unique style though.

DarthBinky
05-10-05, 11:53 AM
The game looks cool. But I have to ask: the main character's name isn't Sam Fisher, is it? That trailer had a "Splinter Cell in Space" feel to it.

oldsk00l
05-10-05, 12:47 PM
PPU's are not going to take off. A dedicated CPU is going to have far more branching capability than a PPU and thus you can do even more with it. A PPU just adds to the hw cost without giving as many features as a more versatile CPU.

It's like taking a slow audio DSP but making it support 90000000000 channels simultaneously but with very little filtering/morphing/encoding ability. Makes no sense to me.

de><ta
05-10-05, 01:08 PM
PPU's are not going to take off. A dedicated CPU is going to have far more branching capability than a PPU and thus you can do even more with it. A PPU just adds to the hw cost without giving as many features as a more versatile CPU.

It's like taking a slow audio DSP but making it support 90000000000 channels simultaneously but with very little filtering/morphing/encoding ability. Makes no sense to me.

Actually you are wrong about that. A specialized processor will always yield far greater performance then a general purpose processor like your CPU. Branching capabilities are not too relevant in ppu's since the majority of calculations are N by N type force calculations. Also ppu's have similiar architectural features as gpu's with the exception that the throughput of a ppu (at least right now) is no where as large as that of a gpu's. Similiar vector based calculations, trasforms and scalings.

Currently I am working on GRAPE cluster project and the GRAPE cards are similiar to the PPU's with the tradeoff being on speed then the number of particle interaction calculations.

jAkUp
05-10-05, 06:14 PM
Yea the PPU is gonna have 128mbs of ram dedicated just for physics... Saying a CPU will be better for physics is like saying that Software rendering is better for video.

Subtestube
05-10-05, 06:20 PM
Mmmm... I should say, I agree with Jak and Dexta here... the PPU should be MUCH better than a general purpose CPU for physics. Specialised hardware pretty much always beats general purpose hardware for the tasks it's built for.

My opinion is just that for an average sized development shop where they don't have development money to throw around on whims, it would be more prudent to develop for a dual-core setup before even considering the currently non-existent PPU, which may not become an industry standard.

Edge
05-10-05, 09:58 PM
We'll have to see how the physics card pans out. I think it could be pretty cool if it functions as promised, but sometimes good ideas just don't turn out well (T-buffers and Truform, anyone?). IF some major games use it well, and IF it's reasonably priced, I think it could end up being a nice option. But if it's retail price is much above $100, I can't see it taking off. It would be nice if they had a "PPU Lite" or something that's not quite as powerful as the full version that was only $50 (or possibly package in with some games and sell it as a bundle), not many people would go for the idea of spending another $200 for a physics card on top of a $100 sound card and $500 video card to get the "best" that they can out of games. If this physics card really can do as much as it can as they advertise, even a cut down version of it would probably be a big improvement over software physics fuctions.

But also, remember that most hardware solutions start out as being WORSE than a software one in some ways. For example, many of the rendering tricks used in games like Trespasser (which ran badly enough in it's native renderer) and Outcast could not be translated to 3d acceleration: early 3d cards were so limited in what they could do that using software mode for some things was the only option. But as the technology progressed and the featuresets of these cards became more mature, software mode became obsolite, and now even a $100 video card can run any game on the market. Even if this physics card does do it's job, I'm worried that the technology won't be adaptable or will have limitations that aren't readilly appearant until a developer tries to do something and finds out it doesn't work. But right now it's hard to say what will become of it.

And off topic (actually looking back, this whole PPU discussion is off topic...), but did anyone else have to look twice when Subtestube used the phrase "Jak and Dexta"? I thought he was talking about a PS2 game for a second there :D

de><ta
05-10-05, 10:06 PM
From a marketing standpoint I reackon their best aproach would be to get some deals going with various motherboard manufacturers and have it integrated on the actual motherboard (or make the motherboard ship with it).

Also if they released drivers for other applications (CAD, EM programs etc) apart from games that require similiar calculations the PPU would have a decent chance of making it into the main market.