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lightman
05-09-05, 01:33 PM
Well...

I was trying to get the damn stock heatsink off of my Asus N6600GT TD, and I accidentally chopped off two or three resistors (or maybe capacitors, can't really distinguish between them. And now, I'm not talking about the big ones, I'm referring to the really small ones ;)) with the screwdriver.

Now, ok, I shouldn't have used a screwdriver to try and pry the fsckin retention system open, I know.

The interesting (and somewhat scareing (sp?)) thing is that after the fact I decided not to install the VF700, put the stock heatsink in place and check if it still worked (the card, not the heatsink ;)).

Now, guess what ? It's working without *any* problem at all.

I tortured it with an hour of Doom3 at High quality settings, 15 mins at Ultra (no, I'm not goin to play at Ultra for more than 15 mins, it's unplayable ;)), 1 hour of Half Life 2, 1 hour of Colin 2005 and about 20 mins of RtCW. No glitches, no problems at all.

Now I'm wondering what the hell of a purpose did the resistors I chopped off serve.

I'm gonna try it for another week or so, if it doesn't give any sign of problem by next sunday, I'm gonna go on and install the VF700, otherwise I'll have it exchanged for a new one. ;)

ViN86
05-09-05, 01:51 PM
if they were resistors (which it sounds like they were) you might want to get that checked out. if the resistance between two points is larger or smaller, the voltages can vary (as per Ohms Law) and that can damage parts.

$n][pErMan
05-09-05, 06:03 PM
RMA ... lol

jAkUp
05-09-05, 06:09 PM
Alot of capacitors on a video card don't effect the short time stability of a card, but it will effect the long term stability of it. I suggest getting it replaced.

|JuiceZ|
05-09-05, 06:11 PM
Alot of capacitors on a video card don't effect the short time stability of a card, but it will effect the long term stability of it. I suggest getting it replaced.

.

adpr 02
05-09-05, 06:19 PM
OMG. Those are on the card for one reason. They are designed for emergencies. If a power spike messes up the psu, and gets into the pc, they turn off the videocard, or prevent it from frying. Those big things on it, really do nothing unless there is an emergency (well, they do stuff, but the card COULD be designed to live without them) Let me explain.

I put a fan on top of the videocard, a few weeks later, I opened my case, and found that the fan had screws in it, and they were touching various metal components. I panicked, and took the fan off :eek:. When I took it off, the screws rubbed on, and made contact with 2 or more components, and my videocard turned off instantly. Nothing was dammaged.

What I am trying to say is that those little things are GREAT. No card should be without them. RMA. You never know when you will need them, and how choppy your PSU is....

Roadhog
05-09-05, 07:52 PM
I say run it till it explodes, then get pics.

CaptNKILL
05-09-05, 08:36 PM
I say run it till it explodes, then get pics.
Screw that! Have a webcam pointed at your video card at all times so we can have a live feed of the action when it happens :D

jAkUp
05-09-05, 09:49 PM
I was reading in another thread that a guy actually used his own semen insted of capacitors!!! :D

ricercar
05-09-05, 09:55 PM
But with the semen, the explosion was the first part of the experiment, not the last?

evilchris
05-09-05, 10:04 PM
if they were resistors (which it sounds like they were) you might want to get that checked out. if the resistance between two points is larger or smaller, the voltages can vary (as per Ohms Law) and that can damage parts.

Voltage won't vary. Voltage drop per component will vary. E = IR. If he knocked off a resistor in a series circuit the circuit is now open and the current is zero.

evilchris
05-09-05, 10:05 PM
Alot of capacitors on a video card don't effect the short time stability of a card, but it will effect the long term stability of it. I suggest getting it replaced.

The tiny ceramic capacitors on a video card are mostly filters. They ensure the DC voltage is clean without a lot of ripple.

einstein_314
05-09-05, 10:16 PM
OMG. Those are on the card for one reason. They are designed for emergencies. If a power spike messes up the psu, and gets into the pc, they turn off the videocard, or prevent it from frying. Those big things on it, really do nothing unless there is an emergency (well, they do stuff, but the card COULD be designed to live without them) Let me explain.

I put a fan on top of the videocard, a few weeks later, I opened my case, and found that the fan had screws in it, and they were touching various metal components. I panicked, and took the fan off :eek:. When I took it off, the screws rubbed on, and made contact with 2 or more components, and my videocard turned off instantly. Nothing was dammaged.

What I am trying to say is that those little things are GREAT. No card should be without them. RMA. You never know when you will need them, and how choppy your PSU is....

Umm. The reason that capacitors and resistors are built into things is to make them work. They aren't there for emergencies. They regulate voltage/current to everything. If you knock one off or break it, there will be no current flow and therefore something isn't working properly anymore. Either you're confused as to what he actually broke, or you don't actually know too much about electronics. And I might point out that I'm no expert myself so feel free to point out my mistakes.

ViN86
05-09-05, 10:27 PM
Voltage won't vary. Voltage drop per component will vary. E = IR. If he knocked off a resistor in a series circuit the circuit is now open and the current is zero.
assuming its in series........

55illinois
05-09-05, 10:30 PM
OMG. Those are on the card for one reason. They are designed for emergencies. If a power spike messes up the psu, and gets into the pc, they turn off the videocard, or prevent it from frying. Those big things on it, really do nothing unless there is an emergency (well, they do stuff, but the card COULD be designed to live without them) Let me explain.

I put a fan on top of the videocard, a few weeks later, I opened my case, and found that the fan had screws in it, and they were touching various metal components. I panicked, and took the fan off :eek:. When I took it off, the screws rubbed on, and made contact with 2 or more components, and my videocard turned off instantly. Nothing was dammaged.

What I am trying to say is that those little things are GREAT. No card should be without them. RMA. You never know when you will need them, and how choppy your PSU is....

You know what drives me crazy? People who mess with their cards and screw them up, break them, damage them, whatever and then RMA them. RMA is for faulty hardware that is not your fault. If something gets broken when you are modifying your card it is YOUR fault and you should not be able to RMA it... this just makes it more expensive for everyone when companies have to support this kind of behavior. Ugh... one of my biggest pet peeves.

CaptNKILL
05-09-05, 10:48 PM
You know what drives me crazy? People who mess with their cards and screw them up, break them, damage them, whatever and then RMA them. RMA is for faulty hardware that is not your fault. If something gets broken when you are modifying your card it is YOUR fault and you should not be able to RMA it... this just makes it more expensive for everyone when companies have to support this kind of behavior. Ugh... one of my biggest pet peeves.
Heh... I dont really have a problem with this at all. I've done it once, though it was because of a faulty fan (and bad instruction on replacing it) that I got from TYAN tech support.
If you break a card, you have three options.

1. Cut the losses and throw it in the trash or use it as a door stop, basically wasting your money and the entire piece of hardware.
2. Sell it "as is" on ebay with or without mentioning the damage. Ripping off the buyer, screwing yourself out of money (theres no way you'll get the full value of the part), and not really solving a damn thing (they will end up in the same position you were).
3. Send it back to the company so they can repair it or recycle the parts, and get a free replacement in return. This makes you happy, possibly gets someone else a replacement card or a cheap refurb and doesnt waste any good hardware. The company might be out a few bucks, but they can make most of it back by reusing the parts or reselling it as a refurb.

In any case, hopefully the user learns something and doesnt have to do it a dozen more times. If they do, then yeah they need to stop messing with stuff and leave hardware to the technicians. But breaking a part once in a while is just part of the experience of learning how to use computers. The only thing you can do after breaking something is try to make the best of whats left. If its salvagable, have it replaced and let the manufacturer repair it and resell it. It irritates the hell out of me when people just toss hardware when they think its broken. A lot of good tech (not to mention money) goes to waste.

ViN86
05-09-05, 11:11 PM
You know what drives me crazy? People who mess with their cards and screw them up, break them, damage them, whatever and then RMA them. RMA is for faulty hardware that is not your fault. If something gets broken when you are modifying your card it is YOUR fault and you should not be able to RMA it... this just makes it more expensive for everyone when companies have to support this kind of behavior. Ugh... one of my biggest pet peeves.
everyone feels this way until they make a slight mistake and trash their card. then they do the RMA thing too...... :cool:

you can quote this and say you wont ever do it, but ill believe it when i see it. fact is, free replacement card vs. door stop...... yea, tell me youre going to just throw it out.

TeaEtchSee
05-10-05, 12:09 AM
[pErMan']RMA ... lol


Technically he voided warranty :)

if he could piece it together back lookin modified (loose screws, vital stickers in place, etc)

he could RMA it :)

jcniest5
05-10-05, 12:38 AM
I once bought an EVGA 6800 Ultra, a return and relabeled for sale. I thought I was getting a good card for cheap. Well, guess what? The card was a total dead POS. The person that returned it must have modded it, and while doing so, broke/chipped off both the GPU and the AGP Bridge. I took off the HSF to examine it when it didn't work or POST at all while my PC was giving me voice warning "VGA TEST FAILED". The card was a piece of junk. I returned it and since it was a return, the shop was not able to give me a new card for exchange for the same price. I asked them if they ever tested or examine their return merchandise. They were speechless, totally dumbfounded. Don't know why some stores have very dumb employees. They should be fired.

Sick Willie
05-10-05, 08:19 AM
Voltage won't vary. Voltage drop per component will vary. E = IR. If he knocked off a resistor in a series circuit the circuit is now open and the current is zero.
Through that resistor, obviously. However, there are very few (if any) simple series circuits present on a modern piece of electronics and the resistor (if it was a resistor) was part of a larger system - the video card - and removal of one component will alter the current delivered to/through other components. Resistors are used for several things: current limiters, voltage dividers, and in the case of RC, RL and RLC filters - bandpass or bandstop filters.

Tiny ceramic capacitors do not make good DC voltage filters - they're too small to hold much of an electric charge - they usually filter a frequency range. Electrolytic capacitors are used for DC voltage filters.

Edited for spelling.

lightman
05-10-05, 08:57 AM
Just to clear it up a little on the RMA'ing, I won't RMA it.

See, I buy some 5-10 mid to high -end cards *every* month from my supplier, plus a bunch of other hardware. I'm (as per their definition) "one of their best customers". And I can assure you all that whenever I have some faulty (or broken, or malfunctioning, or whatever) piece of hardware, I just call 'em and have it replaced for a new part, no questions asked.

And just to point it out clearly, this ain't the first card I modded with a new heatsink/fan. In fact, I do this on *every* card I buy (either for me personally, or for work, or to put in a box that I then resell), and I never had any problem.
The things that made me make the mistake are : 1) I was somewhat in a hurry (never do something in a hurry, I know ;)), 2) I didn't have the pliers I usually use at hand, and so I (dumb) tried to use what I had at hand instead ;) 3) I have a fsckin 'flu that's really fscking me up :D

Now, with regard to the chopped off resistors/capacitors, they were on the backplate, just below one of the ram chips, so I guess (given that everything seems to be working ok) that they were part of a filter circuit, and that everything's still working because of the fact that I have a good PSU, and a good UPS before it. :)

So I will prolly get a new one.

Btw, 55illinois, be sure that you ain't paying more than you should because of people who RMA their cards after things like this, for a couple of reasons... first, they already know there'll be a number of cards that'll be RMA'ed, and they put this "cost" into the overall cost of the card, before deciding the retail price. secondly, the RMA'ed cards are either 1) fixed and sold as refurbished or to OEMs, or 2) sold $/lb as junk. thirdly, even if they should have a lower cost as per the first point, be assurred that they wouldn't lower the retail price, they'd just have higher margins ;)

That said, be carefull everyone, and if you don't have the time, or the tools at hand, or you've got a fsckin 'flu, don't mess with your cards ;) :D

Blade
05-10-05, 02:08 PM
RMA that sucker! I've blown plenty of cpu's & videocards with overclocking, yup & i rma'd em all!!!!!

rohit
05-10-05, 02:18 PM
Since u PHISICALLY damaged the card, the warranty is VOID.

So do this, collect those resistors (wateva they r ), go to a nearby electrical shop or a some trustible person who has knowledge about electronic circuits. and ask him to Solder 'em back onto the PCB.

Blade
05-10-05, 02:23 PM
You could solder em back but it would depend on how close to the resistor or board the cut was & how small they were,small soldering is a bloody nightmare especially when under the influence of mind altering substances, nothing to solder to (metal), no fix.

CaptNKILL
05-10-05, 07:57 PM
Since u PHISICALLY damaged the card, the warranty is VOID.

So do this, collect those resistors (wateva they r ), go to a nearby electrical shop or a some trustible person who has knowledge about electronic circuits. and ask him to Solder 'em back onto the PCB.
Heh, its only void if you send it to them and they actually see physical damage... 9 times out of 10 any company will just look over it real quick, send you a new one and then fix the old one. I've heard of people returning some pretty messed up stuff and not having a problem even though the warranty was supposedly "void" because of physical damage.