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View Full Version : GV-NX66T128D crashes using VIVO after 1 hour


rohan_p
05-10-05, 07:59 AM
I have a GV-NX66T128D in an SB81P Shuttle box. It's the version with fanless cooling. I got the card partly for video capture, but unfortunately, the PC always crashes after about 60 minutes when capturing video via the component video input. I usually get a message saying that a serious error occurred in the NV driver after rebooting.

I generally use the copy of PowerDirector Pro 3 that came with the card, but I've also tried Nero VE. This is generally much worse - often only lasting 20 minutes or so.

I've tried the latest drivers from Gigabyte, also the latest NV drivers. I've also tried a variety of WDM drivers, from GB, Sparkle, and NV. Nothing seems to make the slightest difference. I've also tried turning down acceleration, disabling write combining with no success.

The card temperature gets up to about 90 degrees C around the time it crashes, but I don't know if it's related. In any case, the box doesn't have its cover on at the moment, so it couldn't be better ventilated.

I'd be grateful for any suggestions, as I don't know what else to try short of returning the card.

ArturNOW
05-10-05, 03:42 PM
I have a GV-NX66T128D in an SB81P Shuttle box. It's the version with fanless cooling. I got the card partly for video capture, but unfortunately, the PC always crashes after about 60 minutes when capturing video via the component video input. I usually get a message saying that a serious error occurred in the NV driver after rebooting.

I generally use the copy of PowerDirector Pro 3 that came with the card, but I've also tried Nero VE. This is generally much worse - often only lasting 20 minutes or so.

I've tried the latest drivers from Gigabyte, also the latest NV drivers. I've also tried a variety of WDM drivers, from GB, Sparkle, and NV. Nothing seems to make the slightest difference. I've also tried turning down acceleration, disabling write combining with no success.

The card temperature gets up to about 90 degrees C around the time it crashes, but I don't know if it's related. In any case, the box doesn't have its cover on at the moment, so it couldn't be better ventilated.

I'd be grateful for any suggestions, as I don't know what else to try short of returning the card.
Maybe try using a 80mm fan on it. If your PC won't crash that means it's overheating. What about playing 3D games?

rohan_p
05-10-05, 10:27 PM
I didn't really get the card to play games with, although having it gives me the option. I could try some. (The card's probably excessive for my purposes - music and video editing.)

Puting a fan on the card might isolate the cause of the crashing, but it's not a viable long-term option. After all, the whole point of the card was to have a noiseless cooling system, and there's no room in the case for it.

Is 90 degrees hot for a card? The alarm threshold is 145, and it generally runs at around 85.

ArturNOW
05-11-05, 01:54 AM
I didn't really get the card to play games with, although having it gives me the option. I could try some. (The card's probably excessive for my purposes - music and video editing.)

Puting a fan on the card might isolate the cause of the crashing, but it's not a viable long-term option. After all, the whole point of the card was to have a noiseless cooling system, and there's no room in the case for it.

Is 90 degrees hot for a card? The alarm threshold is 145, and it generally runs at around 85.
If fan helps you can just return that card to the store and get another one. Maybe you should put some fans into your chassis?

rohan_p
05-11-05, 03:56 AM
It's a short form factor PC - as it was, I was going to have to mod the case to fit the heatsink (that's why I'm running it without the cover on at the moment). There's no room for anything else.

void
05-11-05, 04:53 PM
I have a GV-NX66T128D in an SB81P Shuttle box.
..
The card temperature gets up to about 90 degrees C around the time it

My first guess is that card's memory or Philips chip (VIVO) overheats, GPU should hold itself in that temperature. But for long term GPU temperature is too high.

I have MSI NX6600GT 128VTD card in pre-G chassis Shuttle. Chassis is smaller than P chassis, card has VIVO functionality as yours. Longest analog video capture session has been a bit over 4 hours in 1 hour sets (had to change tapes in between :-)

90C is high temperature for GPU. With that high GPU temperature you manage to warm up the board. The GPU generated heat adds memory temp load. With open case you make things worse: It breaks the P chassis air flows, luckily the hot hard drive(s) are moved on top of the case.

I went the other way: From puny passive FX5200 to 6600GT with Zalman VF700-Cu. 6600GT runs now in 3.06GHz/2HDD/DVD/PCI WLAN full-aluminum G-chassis with zalman (I had to cut the cover) idle 45C and load 57C. With 2D desktop and VIVO in use the GPU temperature is in low 50C. No crashes during gameplay or video capture. With passive FX5200 temp crash came after 5 hours in capture.

P chassis can fit Zalman VF700 without case cutting, you have to cut only couple of the topmost heatsink radiators to make it fit. Also with P chassis: Make sure you have latest BIOS, early P chassis BIOSes had thermal throttling problems. More in www.sudhian.com, forum "sff tech.. - XPC and legacy..". Small case and 6600GT are a problem. Obviously VF700 with promised 18dB at 5V fan connection is not as silent as passive cooling, but it is more effective. Passive 6800 VIVO card could be better choise in XPC.

rohan_p
05-13-05, 12:53 AM
I think it might be time to go to Plan B, which is to use the card in another machine I'm building. (I knew about the thermal problem with the SB81P, and did upgrade the BIOS).

Unfortunately, there wasn't enough information available online about the card to realise that the case wouldn't fit the heatsink. I was prepared to mod the case, but this basically consisted of cutting a hole in it. However, if I have to make a cover for the heatsink to keep the case sealed and ensure air is drawn across the sink, this is too difficult for me. Also, I'm not sure if it will solve the problem, and don't want to end up with a messed up case.

It's a pity, because a fanless cooling system is attractive in a machine meant for multimedia. Fans can be very noisy.

ArturNOW
05-13-05, 02:00 AM
Maybe simply downclock the GPU for capturing.

rohan_p
05-13-05, 06:31 AM
I placed a case fan against the heatsink, and the temp was kept at 50 degrees while it was capturing.

It still fell over after about an hour. So I suppose that blows the theory that it was due to overheating.

rohan_p
05-13-05, 07:38 AM
I also tried turing down the clock speed. If anything, it made things worse - it crashed twice after only a few minutes.

By the way, I've been tending to say "after an hour". It's probably only about half an hour in most cases.

ArturNOW
05-13-05, 02:10 PM
I also tried turing down the clock speed. If anything, it made things worse - it crashed twice after only a few minutes.

By the way, I've been tending to say "after an hour". It's probably only about half an hour in most cases.
MAybe you should reinstall driver and, that's the most important, restart your system after installing each driver. In my case it was sth like that: I've install the WDM VIVO drivers... restart, that Windows detected new hardware... installation and restar (that one is very important)... try this way.

rohan_p
05-13-05, 10:39 PM
Yes, but I've done all that, really. Unless there's a better VIVO driver, I don't know what else to do.

Drivers, cooling, clock speed, monitor setup, software - all have been changed, and there isn't the slightest difference. I think it's time to give up on the card.

I tried getting support from Gigabyte, but my message has been sitting there unread for almost a week, so I'm not holding out great hopes.

Kickus_assius
05-14-05, 12:44 AM
90C sounds high, even for passive cooling.

ArturNOW
05-14-05, 01:43 AM
Maybe it's not a problem with your graphics card, but CPU?

rohan_p
05-14-05, 02:59 AM
Just to clarify - the temp is less than 50 now.

I've just discovered an interesting thing - it doesn't have to be actively capturing to crash. If I just have the capture software running, but not actually doing anything other than displaying the input signal, it still crashes. This surprised me, as I assumed it was the CPU-intensive process of video conversion that was causing the problem. (Since it happens with NVE as well, it isn't the software causing the problem.)

The PC does not crash at any other time - only when I am using the capture software, and it always identifies the NV driver as the culprit. Unless it's something like hyperthreading or a motherboard issue, it's hard to know what to think.

ArturNOW
05-14-05, 05:50 AM
http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=49937

I had similar problem :)

rohan_p
05-14-05, 06:35 AM
Actually, I was using a dual monitor set up, although I had also tried disabling it.

I found the driver you mention at Guru of 3D, but am wondering why you chose it. (There is a whole bunch of modified drivers on that site, but no real information about them.)