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View Full Version : How to setup pan-and-scan virtual desktop for just 1 monitor?


Pausanias
07-07-05, 09:05 PM
Hi

I have a 1680x1050 monitor. Is there any way to enable a pan-and-scan virtual desktop (an advertised feature of TwinViewon nvidia.com (http://www.nvidia.com/object/feature_twinview.html) ) for just 1 monitor so I can have even higher resolution (say 2048x1536), and use the mouse to scroll around the virtual desktop?

I did a lot of searching and could not find the answer.

P

j0j081
07-08-05, 11:35 AM
What exactly does this do?

saturnotaku
07-08-05, 12:25 PM
Hi

I have a 1680x1050 monitor. Is there any way to enable a pan-and-scan virtual desktop (an advertised feature of TwinViewon nvidia.com (http://www.nvidia.com/object/feature_twinview.html) ) for just 1 monitor so I can have even higher resolution (say 2048x1536), and use the mouse to scroll around the virtual desktop?

I did a lot of searching and could not find the answer.

P

Although I have no idea why in the world anyone would want to do this, you would be limited to exactly the maximum resolution of your display. A video card can't trick your monitor into doing something the monitor itself is not physically capable of doing. If you really wanted/needed that high a resolution, you should have bought a display that supported it.

Pausanias
07-08-05, 04:43 PM
OK, I guess I didn't explain myself very clearly. Perhaps the wikipedia entry on virtual desktops (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop) will better explain it:

For example if your graphics card has a certain resolution limit (for example 800x600 or even lower), increasing the resolution beyond that point creates a virtual desktop. Your desktop size increases, but you continue to see that portion of the higher resolution screen that you could see under the lower resolution. By moving your mouse pointer to the edges of the screen, the desktop will scroll in that direction, revealing invisible portions of the desktop.

So, capisce? The point is that your desktop becomes *larger* than your monitor, and you use the mouse to scroll around it, much the same way as you would use scroll bars to scroll around this page, except that this would be in 2D, not just up and down.

Why is this useful? I want to play Baldur's Gate 2 in as big a window as possible. BG2 has hardcoded resolutions, and the maximum is 1600x1200. My screen is 1680x1050. By enabling a pan-and-scan desktop, I can make the 1600x1200 resolution work.

Now, please refer to the nvidia.com page I linked to in my original post. They say they support this exact feature for TwinView. But what about just 1 monitor? The traditional way to create a virtual desktop is to select resolutions higher than your monitor is capable of. But that is not possible; Windows only lets me go up to 1680x1050. And the box that says "enable unsupported resolutions" is grayed out.

Pausanias
07-08-05, 06:22 PM
OK. Figured it out for myself.

The solution is to download Coolbits 2 (http://downloads.guru3d.com/download.php?det=815), and run it to modify your registry. Then oad the NVIDIA control panel, and then click on Menu Editing->Restore defaults. After this the "Screen Resolutions & Refresh Rates" menu will pop up. Set a resolution larger than your display, and there you go; you have a custom resolution pan-and-scan desktop.

Yay! BG2 now covers more than 95% of my monitor without having to scale down to a lower resolution.

Kickus_assius
07-08-05, 07:48 PM
I am surprised that people have never heard of this. This happens all the time if you have a tv set up and you set the res to 1024x768. The tv will only display 800x600 and the rest of the screen you just move the mouse to the edge and it will pan over to the missing areas. The feature is very useful is you have a lot of icons and you displaying tv out, so you can just pan and scan to what you want rather than having the whole screen cluttered. The only other use for this is obviously what this guy says as some monitors have proprietary custom resolutions.

crainger
07-08-05, 08:02 PM
Most Lappy's I've used to the same thing. Thanks for the info on how to do it on a Nvidia equipped desktop Pausanias. :)

Pausanias
07-09-05, 05:49 PM
The only other use for this is obviously what this guy says as some monitors have proprietary custom resolutions.

Well, actually the problem is that all laptop LCDs look blurry when viewed at resolution lower than the maximum. I wanted the game to fill the screen as much as possible, *and* I wanted the super crisp pixels available only at max resolution.

Some games (e.g. UT2004, Nevewinter Nights, Guild Wars) are resolution-independent, and this works great for laptops---they automatically detect your max resolution and you can select it in the configuration, regardless of whether it's widescreen or whatever.

However other games (Doom 3, Baldur's Gate 2) have only specific resolutions available (e.g. 1024x768, 1280x960, 1600x1200). What's worse, these games don't take widescreen LCDs into account, offering no modes for widescreen whatsoever. With these games your choice is either to change your desktop resolution below maximum (resulting in lame blurry game play) or else play at full resolution and have your game not fill your screen (very annoying to me).

On a widescreen LCD, for games like Doom 3 and Baldur's Gate 2, selecting a virtual desktop in the manner I've described allows you to have the best of both worlds---(almost) full screen view at maximum resolution.

By the way, if you are an LCD gamer you should not (IMHO) select the (W)UXGA+ type monitors (at 1900 or higher resolution). Few graphics cards can handle rendering full screens at that resolution. So to play games with decent FPS you'll have to scale down to lower resolution---resulting in blurry game play---or else play the game without its filling your screen, which makes poor use of your LCD display and feels a bit claustrophobic, to me, at least. In fact, if the 1680x1050 resolution weren't so great for doing work, I probably would have gotten a 1280x800 laptop instead.

Doc. Caliban
10-15-05, 05:21 PM
OK. Figured it out for myself.

The solution is to download Coolbits 2 (http://downloads.guru3d.com/download.php?det=815), and run it to modify your registry. Then oad the NVIDIA control panel, and then click on Menu Editing->Restore defaults. After this the "Screen Resolutions & Refresh Rates" menu will pop up. Set a resolution larger than your display, and there you go; you have a custom resolution pan-and-scan desktop.

Yay! BG2 now covers more than 95% of my monitor without having to scale down to a lower resolution.


I'm really excited that I found this post. (Someone at notebookforums pointed me to it.) I have been trying to get this feature ever since I had it on my old Stealth 32 card back in 94. Being able to pan-and-scan around a huge desktop makes switching between multiple desktops seem really clunky.

I was not able to get this to work, however. I tried coolbits, but my custom refresh rate menu item was already there. When I try to add a new resolution, it gives me the error, "The custom resolution cannot be added"

Any ideas? I'm trying to create a desktop size of 1920x2400. (Native res is 1920x1200)

-Doc

TimOldehove
05-24-10, 11:11 AM
GiMeSpace Desktop Extender solves this problem in an easy way. It will give you unlimted desktop space and also no size restrictions on your windows size!