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View Full Version : Need some advice on going wireless.


Burpy
09-14-05, 11:37 AM
Ok, I have comcast high speed internet powering 3 computers & a laptop. I purchased the necessary extra ip's ($10 for 5 ips)
from comcast & have decided to go wireless to save that $10. I have no clue and have not dealth with wireless before and
would like some advice as to what hardware & accessories I will need to hook up my 3 comps & laptop.

I have heard it's pretty easy to setup wireless and I'm sure I'll manage on that side of things.
I just need to know about which hardware to buy.

I'll most likely buy it from newegg or someplace else if cheaper.
Just some friendly advice would be a big help.

Three comps running XP Pro and one XP 64bit.
Comcast Chicago.

Thanks,

P.S. Anyone with wireless.. how is it with playing games online? Games like Q3, ET, WC3.

WLanMan
09-14-05, 12:27 PM
Hopefully this will answer most of your questions:

Going wireless does not save needing an IP for each machine - getting a NAT (network address translation) "router" is what will take a single comcast IP and allow you to have as many clients on your local side of the router as you need. Though most wireless access points these days come in a "wireless router" configuration.

For XP 64bit, the wireless LAN 64-bit drivers are still coming along... if that machine is in the same room as the Comcast cable modem room, I would stick with using a wired connection. For that matter, I would stay wired for all non-portable machines in the same room as the comcast - less fuss.

Given you do have one laptop, I'd recommend getting a "wireless router" and set it up like this:
comcast Cable -> wireless NATing router with 4 LAN ports -> wired and wireless machines.

So all your wired machines will get their IP addresses from the router the same way the laptop and any wireless desktops do. Most routers have the 4 + 1 setup... 4 LAN ethernet ports for connecting local machines and 1 WAN ethernet port to connect to your cable modem.

Three routers in this config that would do the job:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833124010
The cheap WRT54G from Linksys - a tried and true product - no frills. (There's an "advanced" GS version but it's kind of buggy).

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833127158
The DLink "gaming" router. The main advantage is 4 gigabit LAN ports in case you need to move big files and such between your wired gigabit machines. Has some supposed lower latency for gaming settings too. Also supports the 108 speed extension (The 108 extension is probably the most prolific of the "better than 11G" speed extensions and appears in super cheap client side wireless from most of the manufacturers - DLink, Netgear, Belkin,...)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833124170
The Linksys super range extender wireless router. Though a higher price for AP (and the matching "SRX" clients), you will see slightly better range with this product. Though I've also heard more stories of this router dying a few weeks after use... but that was early in the product's life cycle.

J-Mag
09-14-05, 12:32 PM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833127158
The DLink "gaming" router. The main advantage is 4 gigabit LAN ports in case you need to move big files and such between your wired gigabit machines. Has some supposed lower latency for gaming settings too. Also supports the 108 speed extension (The 108 extension is probably the most prolific of the "better than 11G" speed extensions and appears in super cheap client side wireless from most of the manufacturers - DLink, Netgear, Belkin,...)


This router supports WAP as well, which I recommend since even I can crack WEP.

WLanMan
09-14-05, 12:46 PM
P.S. Anyone with wireless.. how is it with playing games online? Games like Q3, ET, WC3.

The original 11B stuff was often 16-bit PIO (programmed IO) and had some pretty bad latency, but all the 11G stuff uses DMA with hardware-assist WPA encryption and gets sub millisecond latencies locally. I've played UT2k4, Planetside, and other FPS'es wirelessly with no additional lag notice over those in the same room that were wired. Even most of the USB 2.0 wireless doesn't add much in latency.

As J-Mag said, make sure you enable WPA security (or even better WPA2 with AES). I believe all 3 of those routers have WPA support. The Linksys WRT54G might not have WPA2. (The Linksys site lists it as having WPA).

ENU291
09-14-05, 02:08 PM
Forget those WAP WEP security protocols. Setting up a MAC filter is much easier since the need for remembering passwords is not needed!

ynnek
09-14-05, 02:38 PM
thats definantly not secure though.. MAC address are easily obtained and spoofed.

goto tomsnetworking.com and read up on the articles.

Long story short, varying degree's of protection give you varying degree's of security.

WPA AES , WPA2 will gives you a pretty good level of security, that will thrwat most people and the tools out there.

Then on top of that if you want to throw up a authenticating radius service, that's getting pretty extreme now, for a home personal network at least.


I know there are at least 3 or 4 unprotected networks that I can casually see from my house though.. So unless someone is seriously bored, they can just use those instead of mine.. ;)

Having an extra IP or two can be helpful if you want to host services from multiple computers.

Forget those WAP WEP security protocols. Setting up a MAC filter is much easier since the need for remembering passwords is not needed!

OWA
09-14-05, 03:15 PM
Personally, if you pay bills online, order things online, etc. I'd keep at least one computer using a wired connection and use that one for those type things.

retsam
09-14-05, 03:44 PM
Personally, if you pay bills online, order things online, etc. I'd keep at least one computer using a wired connection and use that one for those type things. but then your vulnarible to arp cache spoofing.... if your wireless router has wpa use it....

J-Mag
09-14-05, 03:58 PM
I know there are at least 3 or 4 unprotected networks that I can casually see from my house though.. So unless someone is seriously bored, they can just use those instead of mine.. ;)


Yeah My complex has at least 4 or 5 unprotected networks out of the 12 or so I can see. Retards...

Anyway, you should be careful using those networks because
A. It is illegal
B. Logging Honeypots

It is rather easy to set up an open wireless network to log users data as they shop, login to website, etc...

retsam
09-14-05, 07:42 PM
t is rather easy to set up an open wireless network to log users data as they shop, login to website, etc... yep, your right, they can use this to set up man in the middle attacks.... high jack sessions ect ect.....

ViN86
09-14-05, 08:26 PM
honestly, nothin is totally secure. but the wired connection would be your most secure connection. i have a wireless router with WEP enabled. im sure someone could crack it, but its more of a deterrent than a stop all thing.

seeker010
09-14-05, 09:45 PM
I would really like to see someone try to crack wpa-tkip with a 128bit strong password (about 16-19 characters) since that is sufficient to avoid dictionary based attacks

retsam
09-14-05, 09:53 PM
I would really like to see someone try to crack wpa-tkip with a 128bit strong password (about 16-19 characters) since that is sufficient to avoid dictionary based attacks there are no known cracks for wpa tkip.... even dictianary attacks would take months todo...

koolhonda
09-15-05, 10:10 AM
I have a WRT54G with a WPC54G and a WMP54G all playing along nicely with each other. Never really used them for gaming though.

Burpy
09-15-05, 01:44 PM
Thanks for all the feedback guys, I'll keep my gaming computers hardwired and go wireless for the laptop.

Strahd
09-15-05, 05:34 PM
I would also suggest using WEP and if your router has the feature, you can limit access via MAC address. Your router can tell you what MAC address's are connected to it, just add them to the list of only allow this/these MAC address to connect ALONG with WEP and it's a pretty good defense.

Nothing is completely secure but atleast that's two things someone would have to get past in order to use your wireless connection.

I have 6 machines at home using one IP address via NAT and it works great :D

ynnek
09-16-05, 10:56 AM
slightly off topic, but a while back, when I visted my friend in Carnige Mellon (is that how you spell it?) he highly suggested for me NOT to do anything serious over his wired dorm inet connection, because it was well known there were a lots of people packet sniffing and stealing personal information at campus... madness!