PDA

View Full Version : OCZ Reveals "Honeycomb" Heat Spreaders


jAkUp
10-26-05, 11:19 AM
http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/memory/display/20051025192021.html

Ninjaman09
10-26-05, 11:24 AM
Cool! *ba-doom ching*

Q
10-26-05, 11:46 AM
And to think that it took this long... I've always thought that heatspreaders were kind of unneeded as long as you had good cooling in your system. Memory gets hot, but there are just so many hot points it seems like it just wouldn't matter.

This is a good enough idea, but is it really going to help that much?

|JuiceZ|
10-26-05, 11:48 AM
This is a good enough idea, but is it really going to help that much?

Doubt it, heat spreaders aren't known to have any impact on memory performance.

Strahd
10-26-05, 12:01 PM
I know most people say that heat spreaders don't have any impact on performance but they way I look at it is it can't hurt. We all know that heat is not conducive to performance and anything that helps alleviate that is ok in my book. Heat spreaders + good air flow = cooler running memory so how can that not help? If nothing else, you could OC it more since it runs cooler :)

extreme4377
10-26-05, 04:33 PM
Looks sick. Now to talk myself out of selling my current and getting the new...

mx125race
10-26-05, 04:48 PM
Looks sick. Now to talk myself out of selling my current and getting the new...

without a doubt...:rolleyes:

|JuiceZ|
10-26-05, 05:05 PM
I know most people say that heat spreaders don't have any impact on performance but they way I look at it is it can't hurt. We all know that heat is not conducive to performance and anything that helps alleviate that is ok in my book. Heat spreaders + good air flow = cooler running memory so how can that not help? If nothing else, you could OC it more since it runs cooler :)

Sure it doesn't hurt but don't expect higher overclocking numbers because of a new fangle heat spreaders. System ram just doesn't run hot enough to show significate benefits like the GDDR3 modules do on today's graphics cards.

Strahd
10-26-05, 05:15 PM
I really wasn't talking about significant benefits but you start pumping more voltage through that memory and it will heat up just like anything else. You start getting to 3.0v and a little heat dissipation could mean the difference between stability or not.

I don't put alot of stock in heat spreaders for memory but I do think it does help at higher voltages. Just my 2 cents.

superklye
10-26-05, 05:28 PM
I think they look sweet, but I was really hoping this was going to be like CAS 2-2-2-5 DDR800 RAM or something crazy.

|JuiceZ|
10-26-05, 06:02 PM
I really wasn't talking about significant benefits but you start pumping more voltage through that memory and it will heat up just like anything else. You start getting to 3.0v and a little heat dissipation could mean the difference between stability or not.

I don't put alot of stock in heat spreaders for memory but I do think it does help at higher voltages. Just my 2 cents.

Good point.

uOpt
10-26-05, 06:03 PM
The heatspreaders are optics only and actually build up more heat that they help dissipate. Even OCZ says that but flashy heatspreaders is what the market demands.

The only question is whether they help if you have high airflow from active cooling. Some say yes, some say no. I doubt that.

The heatspreaders help with people not blowing up their stuff with static electricity discharges, though.

superklye
10-26-05, 06:05 PM
The heatspreaders are optics only and actually build up more heat that they help dissipate. Even OCZ says that but flashy heatspreaders is what the market demands.

The only question is whether they help if you have high airflow from active cooling. Some say yes, some say no. I doubt that.

The heatspreaders help with people not blowing up their stuff with static electricity discharges, though.
Pfft...dude, static electricity is just a figment of the liberal media's imagination that they use to freak us all out into buying those dorky wrist things.

jAkUp
10-26-05, 09:02 PM
I think heatspreaders would work better with active cooling. The spreader absorbs the heat, then cooled down by a fan...

mx125race
10-26-05, 10:26 PM
Pfft...dude, static electricity is just a figment of the liberal media's imagination that they use to freak us all out into buying those dorky wrist things.

so f'ing true man! all these ppl on dell forums are like," OMG make sure you touch the back or you hurt your finger and the hardware because all this static electricity, omfg!!! dont forget!11!1!!!!11!"

$n][pErMan
10-26-05, 11:11 PM
Pfft...dude, static electricity is just a figment of the liberal media's imagination that they use to freak us all out into buying those dorky wrist things.
It acctually depends what device you are handling .. some devices will fry due to a static charge. But I doubt much (if anything) will fry in a PC due to it anymore unless you built up a huge charge in the winter by scuffing your feet on carpet. You would be surprised how much static energy you can sotre ;) I always just take care to watch what im doing. Touching the case before I touch a component has always worked for me.

jAkUp
10-26-05, 11:30 PM
Yea, I usually take slight caution, but some people go wayyy overboard.

Q
10-26-05, 11:36 PM
I take slight caution as well, but then again I'm not dealing with $1000 CPU's and $1000+ worth of video cards either.

I'd wear a damn bubble suit if I were dealing with those.

superklye
10-27-05, 12:00 AM
I was just kidding. I always ground myself like 8 times before doing anything with my computer.

Riptide
10-27-05, 08:20 AM
I always ground myself when touching components. Sometimes I will ground myself repeatedly depending on what it is I'm touching. CPUs and RAM are probably the most sensitive items I would guess.

Regarding these heatspreaders... they look the sex. But I think it's probably more of a gimmick than anything else. At least that's my initial feeling anyway. BTW, a lot of overclockers rig fans up on their memory. Now though so many boards have the DIMM slots right next to the CPU socket that the HSF for the processor ends up providing some air movement over them.

uOpt
10-27-05, 10:47 AM
About the risk of static eletricity:

People here are used to take PCs apart and will probably automatically apply common sense.

But Joe Random PC user who takes his PC "apart" for the first time to install new RAM ("apart" is his word for removing the cover :)) can much more more clumsy than that. He can run around with the module in his hand all the time, scrubbing over his carpet and twisting his (grounded) heat radiator with the RAM module first.

In a high-availability static electriciy discharge damage is a major factor. Even discharges you cannot feel can permanently pre-damage a CPU and doom it to fail later, although it works fine now. There was a thread on 2cpuforums just recently, I could link if people are interested.