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View Full Version : help an ethernet noob


russ_3d
01-22-06, 03:33 PM
i know you guys will know the solution for this, its so nooby.

i use a usb/ethernet modem. i have been told that ethernet is a faster connection than usb, and i havent been getting quite the performance i expect from my 3mbit > 10mbit upgrade.

so i am trying to plug in the modem using ethernet, and i cant get it to work :o

plug in leads. install drivers (nforce2 for k7n2 delta msi) reboot. voila?

no, yellow hazard over my network connection. i have tried turning things on and off in the bios, but nothing.


i am obviously missing something very noobish, and my brain has grown lazy due to usb.



'elp :o

rudedog
01-22-06, 03:56 PM
cycle power to the cable modem. It has to pick up the new mac address of your nic

russ_3d
01-22-06, 04:04 PM
haha told you it was nooby. it worked straight away. i just couldnt think what to do to make it work :o

also just quickly, how much better is an ethernet than a usb for dl/ul speeds?

rudedog
01-22-06, 04:24 PM
TBH I don't think your going to see a difference. Unless your xfering something between computers on your own network,

Your cable modem is still the bottleneck.

you should drop over to dslreports and test your connection.

good luck

Spyke
01-22-06, 05:21 PM
Personally I wouldn't use USB for any network connection where you have an ethernet option. USB connected modems are just a waste of CPU cycles where it is not necessary.

crainger
01-22-06, 05:33 PM
They also require messy drivers. :thumbdwn:

Smokey
01-22-06, 06:45 PM
Usb is also limited to 8Mbps.

Son Goku
01-22-06, 11:08 PM
hehe, I've got a USB 2.0 HD attached to my computer, but that's another story :D

Anyhow, and just an FYI, ethernet and USB are 2 seperate buses. Ethernet is the networking bus which is used to allow for net communications between your NIC and your cable modem. This is not a replacement for the USB bus, or vice versa. Now there are multiple ways you can get an ethernet NIC in there, be it the USB connection, be it a PCI slot, (some older NICs used to plug into ISA slots, but be haven't seen those in many years), or be it integrated into the motherboard. The ethernet bus, and the USB, PCI, or whatever bus shouldn't be confused with each other. The latter are simply buses provided on your motherboard, to allow you to add expansion cards/devices to your computer then what was integrated on the mobo itself.

Hope this helps clear up any possible confusion, without adding any new confusion into the mix. Also, as to the available bandwidth, this might or might not matter. For instance your NIC might be a 100 Base T ( 100 Mbit/sec) ethernet card. However, given most cable providers, you won't see near this sort of transfer rate over the cable modem itself. Buses such as PCI however, also have shared BW, so the available bandwidth has to be shared between multiple attached devices. Now if one for instance were to have a SCSI controller card with their HDs on the same bus as the NIC, this might make a difference, as hard drives themselves can transfer data at a fairly high rate...

ViN86
01-23-06, 12:02 PM
Usb is also limited to 8Mbps.
isnt USB2.0 a 480Mbps transfer rate?

Son Goku
01-23-06, 04:48 PM
Yes, here's some info on it

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/10

Now, if we're dealing with USB 1.1, then that can start to become an issue for net communications depending on the service, albeit I haven't yet seen a WAN provider for home that gives 12+ Mbps (except maybe Optimum Online or something of the sort). Not sure if the USB BW is per port however, or shared between both ports on a given USB expansion card or whatever (that uses the same header on the mobo)...