PDA

View Full Version : HD Life Expectancy


Pages : [1] 2

seeker
03-12-06, 10:53 AM
I realize that there is no definite answer for this, but since my Maxtor SATA HDs have just ran out of warranty (1 year), I'm wondering just how long I should expect them to last? The reason for this question is that on my last computer, I had to RMA the drives several times in the first year.

a12ctic
03-12-06, 11:31 AM
I realize that there is no definite answer for this, but since my Maxtor SATA HDs have just ran out of warranty (1 year), I'm wondering just how long I should expect them to last? The reason for this question is that on my last computer, I had to RMA the drives several times in the first year.
I have never needed to rma a drive EVER...

Sazar
03-12-06, 11:34 AM
I've had 2 drives die on me so far. They both gave me about 3 years of service.

2 of the hdd's in my current case have been around for almost 2 years. Typically, on average usage you might expect 3-5 years or so. Naturally there are far too many factors that go into consideration.

JakUp gets a new hdd every week for example.

Capt. Picard
03-12-06, 11:37 AM
I had a Fijitsu 6GB that lasted 6 years. It did have 2 bad sectors though.

a12ctic
03-12-06, 11:49 AM
I've had 2 drives die on me so far. They both gave me about 3 years of service.

2 of the hdd's in my current case have been around for almost 2 years. Typically, on average usage you might expect 3-5 years or so. Naturally there are far too many factors that go into consideration.

JakUp gets a new hdd every week for example.
the second drive in my comp right now (30 gig) has been running sence 1999 almost non-stop, it even spent some time in my server ;)

seeker
03-12-06, 12:00 PM
I've never been too sure, because I leave my computer on 24 hours a day. Partly just because of a preference that I have, but also because one vendor that supplied the components of one of my computers, claimed that this would cause the HDs to last longer than a drive that is turned on and off each day. Apparently, due to heat and cooling, etc. But then again, I left the computer on in this fashion with the drives that I had trouble with also.

evilchris
03-12-06, 12:16 PM
Anywhere from 1 minute to forever.

ViN86
03-12-06, 12:43 PM
i have a WD drive that was an original inside a Dell PII 333MHz system. it works like the day we got it.

that should put things in perspective about how long they tend to last. i wouldnt worry too much, the one year is just to prevent you from getting a bad drive really. if it lasted one year so far, odds are it will last a couple more at least.

nV`andrew
03-12-06, 12:55 PM
if my one of my drives don't last 2 years, i shoot him/her

:)

it should last easily another year and a lot more if it is kept udner good conditions and enviroments

Riptide
03-12-06, 01:00 PM
Look at the manufacturer's specs for the drive. There will be something in there about the MTBF which will give you a clue as to how much you can expect.

Son Goku
03-12-06, 05:46 PM
I've had 2 drives die on me so far. They both gave me about 3 years of service.

2 of the hdd's in my current case have been around for almost 2 years. Typically, on average usage you might expect 3-5 years or so. Naturally there are far too many factors that go into consideration.

JakUp gets a new hdd every week for example.

Part of it can also be affected by the warranty on the drive; or should I say more accuratly, the warranty represents the manufacturers level of confidence wrt the drive, to a degree.

My Seagate Cheetahs came with a 3 year warranty (I think the Barracudas are either 3, or they might now be 5 years though someone could look that up). Logically, if a drive with a 5 year warranty died on average within 3-5 years, then this would fall within the warranty period and result in the manufacturer having to RMA a lot of drives.

Given the cost of free replacements, it wouldn't be profitable from a marketing standpoint to extend the product's warranty longer then it's typical lifespan. Though of little use to the original poster, the product with the longer warranty was likely to have been designed to last longer, and manufacturers do have ways to test/estimate this under certain conditions...

That said given the original warranty was shorter in this guys case (1 year), don't expect the thing to necessarily last as long as my Cheetah drives have where I got 1 drive in June 1998 and another in Dec 2000, and neither have shown signs of dieing yet.

Riptide
03-12-06, 05:51 PM
It helps to keep them actively cooled and also avoid dropping them (doh!) or jostling your computer or desk while they are in operation.

CaptNKILL
03-12-06, 06:00 PM
I have never personally lost a hard drive other than old crap I was trying to use in an old system.

My 6.4gig Quantum is still running in the Gateway it came in in 1998. I think the 20gig Quantum I used to use is still running fine in a system I sold to a friend 4 years ago (bought the drive in 2000 probably). My 60gig Maxtor is still running great and I use it every day in my machine at work. My current 200gig seagate is running perfectly as well and I think I've had it almost a year now (cant remember exactly). Last year some time I was trying to get an old system working and I had an 8 year old Quantum bigfoot 2 gig drive crap out on me (bad sectors).

My brother lost an old 1gig maxtor about 7 years ago and he broke (power plug snapped off of the PCB) an old 500Mb Seagate drive a year or so before that.

Other than those, neither of us have had any hard drive failure.

Son Goku
03-12-06, 06:03 PM
It helps to keep them actively cooled and also avoid dropping them (doh!) or jostling your computer or desk while they are in operation.

Oh yes, temps affect it a lot; and yes also with 10k rpm drives active cooling is even recommended...

BTW, on the other end of the spectrum was the time the air conditioner died in the server closet in the networking lab. They were left tearing down the comps a bit, and replacing half the hard drives. I don't care who the manufacturer or drive is, once the A/C dies in the small computer room, and that room hits 150+ degrees F, you're in a world of hurt. :eek: And a small room, with a lot of high end networking equipment + servers, it doesn't take very much time for the temps to rise... Temps most definitely do affect the life expectancy of this stuff...

Rakeesh
03-12-06, 06:34 PM
I have owned several hard drives, and never had any die on me before. My oldest one is about 8 or so years old I think.

There was one hard drive that I was borrowing that died though, and it was actually quite new.

Riptide
03-12-06, 07:11 PM
Yeah TBH I've never had any die on me. At least if I have - it's been so long I've forgotten.

I've seen a ton of 20GB Maxtor DiamondMax 8 ATA133 drives blow up in the Dells at work though. Total junk.

evilchris
03-12-06, 07:15 PM
Yeah TBH I've never had any die on me. At least if I have - it's been so long I've forgotten.

I've seen a ton of 20GB Maxtor DiamondMax 8 ATA133 drives blow up in the Dells at work though. Total junk.

Those little slim ones? Those are complete pieces of ****. I've seen a ton fail too.

Riptide
03-12-06, 07:17 PM
Yep. Those are the exact ones I'm talking about. And they are the devil's spawn. The GX260 optiplex's at work have them and they are by far the most common component to fail.

nukem
03-12-06, 07:31 PM
If your worried about your drive going you should look into S.M.A.R.T it basicly looks at your harddrive and sees what the status of the drive is. It can usally tell you whats wrong and if theres something wrong how long you have until it dies. You can also goto your harddrive manufacturers web site and download looks that see the status of your drive. Anyway usally drives last a long time and by the time you need a new one you need a hole new computer.

OWA
03-12-06, 07:40 PM
I haven't had any drives fail in several years but I usually replace drives once they start getting a little noisy (once they start making a whirring noise). I then move the noisy drives to external cases that I just use to hold temporary files / non-critical backups.

seeker
03-12-06, 09:05 PM
I have no reason to believe that there is any problems with my current HDs. I was merely pondering this as a factor bearing on the possibility that I might buy a couple more. I have had more than the typical amount of bad luck when it came to my past HDs, but I was wondering how much of that was luck, and how much might be typical of HDs in general.

Mr_LoL
03-13-06, 01:21 AM
Maxtors are quite dodgy. I am quite scared of mine failing especially as the airflow in my case sucks real bad. I sometimes get clicking noises during boot up but it goes into windows fine.

CaptNKILL
03-13-06, 01:38 AM
Maxtors are quite dodgy. I am quite scared of mine failing especially as the airflow in my case sucks real bad. I sometimes get clicking noises during boot up but it goes into windows fine.
If its a DiamondMax Plus 9 I wouldnt worry too much. Thats what my 60gig is and its been running pretty much constantly since 2002.

That said, backups are always a good thing. Do them thoroughly, and do them often.

Mr_LoL
03-13-06, 01:49 AM
If its a DiamondMax Plus 9 I wouldnt worry too much. Thats what my 60gig is and its been running pretty much constantly since 2002.

That said, backups are always a good thing. Do them thoroughly, and do them often.

Thanks. I think I will get another drive and do a backup today. I dont really want to lose all my music and pron etc. Do you know of any good progammes that can do backups easily?

Son Goku
03-13-06, 04:04 AM
I have no reason to believe that there is any problems with my current HDs. I was merely pondering this as a factor bearing on the possibility that I might buy a couple more. I have had more than the typical amount of bad luck when it came to my past HDs, but I was wondering how much of that was luck, and how much might be typical of HDs in general.

Probably won't happen for awhile, but just to be on the safe side; routine backups of all your critical data, and then don't worry about it. If not setup already, create a

\data

or

\users\user_name

folder for your data, create sub-folders, and move/save all your critical data there... Back that up routinely, and if any unfortunate thing should happen, you just lose your install and none of your data... Having done that, you should be good to go, with nothing to concern yourself about... Windows/apps can always be reinstalled :)

I have owned several hard drives, and never had any die on me before. My oldest one is about 8 or so years old I think.

There was one hard drive that I was borrowing that died though, and it was actually quite new.

Yeah, I'm thinking my first Cheetah won't go from dieing at this point, though I have given thought to it tbh... It'll probably go because I need more space, and if I replace an internal drive, it's the smaller one that's going first... 9.1 GB isn't what it used to be. That said, with 9.1 GB + 37.6 GB (both internal cheetahs), and then 100 GB external Maxtor (really 8.47 GB + 34.17 GB + 93.37 GB) total, I'm not really strapped for space now. Gfx card upgrade is next in line...

BTW, a friend of mine had a 1.6 GB Western Digital that went south many years back. As it turned out, it was a rather piss poor model. My 2.5 GB WD drive (bought around the same time) lasted, albeit the given model I had didn't have the bad rep his model turned out to have in the end...