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View Full Version : Did Intel design Conroe for gaming performance?


sillyeagle
06-07-06, 10:26 AM
Seems to me it would have been in intels best interest to design a chip around performance in games, since it seems games and enthusiasts are what drives the need for performance ahead. Plus it seems game benchmarks get the most publicity, so designing a chip to mainly perform well in that area would make a lot of sense. Outside of the enthusiast arena, who are mostly gamers, most people could care less about what chip is faster, or who has the best price vs performance ratio.

coldpower27
06-07-06, 11:19 AM
Intel designed Core Architecture to have strong integer and SSE performance, which just happens to be what games like at this point.

They didn't desig the CPU for games.

sillyeagle
06-07-06, 11:37 AM
Intel designed Core Architecture to have strong integer and SSE performance, which just happens to be what games like at this point.


Well thats what I'm getting at.

coldpower27
06-07-06, 11:49 AM
Well thats what I'm getting at.

Is it? You keep going on and on about gamers. It also depends gamers =/= to enthusiasts.

Intel's Core Architecture is designed to be High IPC, and have high performance per watt. As a secondary effect of that everything else just falls into place. I would say Intel is targetting exactly what it's marketing intiatives are saying now performance per watt, rather then gamers specifically.

sillyeagle
06-07-06, 12:43 PM
Well I lack the arcitecture knowledge to understand the specific design descision, but generally speaking it seems to me they understand what will lead to a bigger performance payoff and allow them to recapture the market share lost to AMD, and like you said things just fall into place. I guess I was thinking a bit of thier marketing initiative was to have a big showing in the internet community, where there happens to be a lot of gamers.

Seems to me AMD would not have reached the level of market share that they have if it were not for gamers specifically, and the internet community.

Sazar
06-07-06, 06:18 PM
The architecture is designed for more symmetry and balance than the crappy p4 netburst/brute force design.

It provides more longevity and provides a solid base for new processors with more cores and design flexibility as well by having fewer stages.

Games, as has been said, just happen to utilise what the core architecture's strengths are and therefore run faster.

Same with the a64's. They just had superior ACTUAL integer and instruction performance hence the domination in games.

AMD still has a ways to go but they have a much better business model, they can provide more procs to fill the market, unlike before, AND they have a performance footing to stand on.

The vast majority of people don't give a crap about the proc in their system. Enthusiasts typically prefer AMD and now pro's (servers/workstations) are also using AMD so that kind of seeds the market for converts to the AMD family of procs.

Intel has devoted a lot of time and effort into designing products with very low TDP and the benefits are clear to see. AMD may be hard-pressed to make the kind of impact it did when the hammer cores came out.

coldpower27
06-07-06, 09:52 PM
The architecture is designed for more symmetry and balance than the crappy p4 netburst/brute force design.

It provides more longevity and provides a solid base for new processors with more cores and design flexibility as well by having fewer stages.

Games, as has been said, just happen to utilise what the core architecture's strengths are and therefore run faster.

Same with the a64's. They just had superior ACTUAL integer and instruction performance hence the domination in games.

AMD still has a ways to go but they have a much better business model, they can provide more procs to fill the market, unlike before, AND they have a performance footing to stand on.

The vast majority of people don't give a crap about the proc in their system. Enthusiasts typically prefer AMD and now pro's (servers/workstations) are also using AMD so that kind of seeds the market for converts to the AMD family of procs.

Intel has devoted a lot of time and effort into designing products with very low TDP and the benefits are clear to see. AMD may be hard-pressed to make the kind of impact it did when the hammer cores came out.

The fact that enthusiasts prefer AMD up to now isn't surprising as AMD has had the performance crown for quite some time in gaming.