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View Full Version : slowest point in modern systems


fantomas
02-10-03, 02:30 PM
Whats the bottleneck in your system? If I get an AMD 3000 and the nforce2 chipset designed to run at 400mhz, then I need a mobo to stick this on, and Ram. Now does a Pentium with its 533mhz fsb combined with some 800mhz Rambus ram beat the AMB rig (assuming all other things are equal) significantly? How important is all this, and how much improvement in games can you expect to see?

The reason I ask is I have a k266 mobo, and 256mb DDR ram. Im thinking about getting more ram, and upgrading the AMD cpu from the 1600+ to the 3000+, but if the impact of a 400 mhz fsb (or even the Pentiums 533mhz, and soon to be 800mhz) is significant I might just get a whole new computer. :confused:

While im asking..: how important is cache on the cpu? AMD's seem tiny in comparison to Intels, and SGI have massive caches on their cpu's. Intel have some cpu's coming out soon with HUGE caches, how will this help me in gaming or modelling?

VeritechK7
02-10-03, 03:02 PM
slowest will always be hard drive (well for frequent use. if not, it's always the darn floppy :p) don't want that processor waiting on some sluggish and slow thing.

-=DVS=-
02-10-03, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by fantomas
Whats the bottleneck in your system? If I get an AMD 3000 and the nforce2 chipset designed to run at 400mhz, then I need a mobo to stick this on, and Ram. Now does a Pentium with its 533mhz fsb combined with some 800mhz Rambus ram beat the AMB rig (assuming all other things are equal) significantly? How important is all this, and how much improvement in games can you expect to see?

The reason I ask is I have a k266 mobo, and 256mb DDR ram. Im thinking about getting more ram, and upgrading the AMD cpu from the 1600+ to the 3000+, but if the impact of a 400 mhz fsb (or even the Pentiums 533mhz, and soon to be 800mhz) is significant I might just get a whole new computer. :confused:

While im asking..: how important is cache on the cpu? AMD's seem tiny in comparison to Intels, and SGI have massive caches on their cpu's. Intel have some cpu's coming out soon with HUGE caches, how will this help me in gaming or modelling?


well FSB going from 533 to 800 :eek: will have insane hit on game benchmarks like 3dmark 2k1

all P4 perform better then Athlon becouse of high FSB look at overcloaked Athlon at 200FSB score sky rockets ;)

Can't wait for Prescot running 800 FSB , but its very far away :(

VeritechK7
02-10-03, 03:20 PM
the bigger cache allows the storing of more repeated commands in your given prograsm

Shinri Hikari
02-10-03, 04:15 PM
I am of the opinion that the thru communication of the mobo is the slow spot no matter who is the maker, could be wrong though...:confused:

fantomas
02-10-03, 05:04 PM
as far as I can tell the weakest/slowest point in a typical home pc is the fsb - the speed at which the chip sends and receives data from the ram and the gpu. So, you want the fastest fsb chip (Intel), fastest ram that can take advantage of this and the fastest chipset-nforce2. Which is AMD only? So 400mhz seems to be the best at the moment....

To the poster who thought HD was the slow point: are you sure? I have swapped a 5400rpm for a 7200rpm and there seems to be zero difference. By the way I didnt benchmark, just using a general feel...:)

VeritechK7
02-10-03, 05:10 PM
well. I guess but a 7200 rpm will help when loading stuff like your games and maps. will also help w/ bootup ..

i'm looking to get a 10k rpm SCSI drive sometime in the future ..
when my funds are where they need to be of course.

Shinri Hikari
02-10-03, 05:25 PM
I have a SCSI 10k RAID 0 array and that didn't help very much, I am fairly sure that the bus speeds on the mobo are the biggest bottleneck(not fsb but the other buses).

If you are interested about my spec's, go here:

http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&threadid=6682

VeritechK7
02-10-03, 05:29 PM
Interesting. My friend said the same thing. He said that Raid 0 is only good for sustained transfers. But SCSi is still king in terms of seek bound applications (and there are plenty of these). I just read in your spec sheet that you're not a big fan of IDe. Neither am I anymore. my IBM is on its last legs and all and it's only been a couple of years.

Shinri Hikari
02-10-03, 05:36 PM
For harddrives, SCSI is worth every penny:cool:, and that is a mountain of pennies.:eek:

VeritechK7
02-10-03, 05:40 PM
well the mountain doesn't have to be so big if you do the right homework ;). I mean i'm more impressed by my current scsi build right now. they're ancient stuff but still get the job done. I can't wait to get a new SCSi hard drive and hopefully get rid of my IBM drive. I don't know about my CD drives though. i' m waiting for them to die out :p