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View Full Version : Microsoft revises Vista license


Zelda_fan
11-02-06, 02:36 PM
http://windowsvistablog.com/blogs/windowsvista/archive/2006/11/02/news-revision-to-windows-vista-retail-licensing-terms.aspx

You may uninstall the software and install it on another device for your use.

Great news. Looks like Microsoft does indeed listen to the enthusiast community.

evilghost
11-02-06, 02:52 PM
How many people in the community were asking for restrictive DRM?

rewt
11-02-06, 02:57 PM
How restrictive is it really? Do you have any resources I could read about this evilghost? Thanks.

Zelda_fan
11-02-06, 03:00 PM
How restrictive is it really? Do you have any resources I could read about this evilghost? Thanks.


It's not. I don't think I've ever bought a product and had problems using it due to DRM restrictions.

BTW regardless, Microsoft has no control over DRM. That's the movie and music industry. Microsoft must either play ball, or they can't support DVD playback in their operating system.

evilghost
11-02-06, 03:01 PM
http://arstechnica.com/journals/microsoft.ars/2006/6/5/4223
http://www.techweb.com/wire/software/167101037
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/101206-vistas-drm-features-could-bedevil.html?fsrc=rss-security
http://it.slashdot.org/it/06/10/11/158212.shtml

evilghost
11-02-06, 03:02 PM
It's not. I don't think I've ever bought a product and had problems using it due to DRM restrictions.

BTW regardless, Microsoft has no control over DRM. That's the movie and music industry. Microsoft must either play ball, or they can't support DVD playback in their operating system.

Read the articles I posted...

rewt
11-02-06, 03:06 PM
http://arstechnica.com/journals/microsoft.ars/2006/6/5/4223
http://www.techweb.com/wire/software/167101037
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/101206-vistas-drm-features-could-bedevil.html?fsrc=rss-security
http://it.slashdot.org/it/06/10/11/158212.shtml

Damn, you weren't kidding! Thanks for the links.

Zelda_fan
11-02-06, 03:16 PM
http://arstechnica.com/journals/microsoft.ars/2006/6/5/4223
http://www.techweb.com/wire/software/167101037
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/101206-vistas-drm-features-could-bedevil.html?fsrc=rss-security
http://it.slashdot.org/it/06/10/11/158212.shtml

Read them, and here's the reality: no one is affected. Please give me on practical example where I would be affected by those DRM procedures.

Zelda_fan
11-02-06, 03:16 PM
Damn, you weren't kidding! Thanks for the links.

don't be fooled by the complex words in those articles. The reality is you're not going to be effected as long as you purchase your stuff legally.

rewt
11-02-06, 03:33 PM
The reality is you're not going to be effected as long as you purchase your stuff legally.

Wrong.

As a developer, I have already been affected by it. Features of my NVTray program will need to be rewritten because of the way Vista blocks some of its hooking procedures.

As a user, I will now have to wait for various other software I use to become compatible with Vista's new DRM methods, if ever.

I'm now worried about my music collection as well. I read there may be licensing issues in WMP11, where I cannot move the music onto another device and play it.

The issue about HDCP is unavoidable. High def content will require protection, PC or home entertainment systems alike. Luckily I had read about this before hand and purchased an HDCP compliant HDTV. But did you, or the majority of other users out there consider this when purchasing their new TV or computer monitor?

evilghost
11-02-06, 04:01 PM
http://upload.madpwnage.net/upload/owned-42873.jpg

GamerGuyX
11-02-06, 10:35 PM
Okay guys you convinced me. No more Vista for me.

I'll use Linux to play all my new and upcoming PC games. Oh wait...

Zelda_fan
11-02-06, 11:07 PM
Wrong.

As a developer, I have already been affected by it. Features of my NVTray program will need to be rewritten because of the way Vista blocks some of its hooking procedures.

No offense to you as a developer, but I'm glad Vista is blocking certain hooking procedures.


As a user, I will now have to wait for various other software I use to become compatible with Vista's new DRM methods, if ever.

Again, if the software was using certain hooking features and is now incompatible, I'm HAPPY it won't work anymore.


I'm now worried about my music collection as well. I read there may be licensing issues in WMP11, where I cannot move the music onto another device and play it.

The issue about HDCP is unavoidable. High def content will require protection, PC or home entertainment systems alike. Luckily I had read about this before hand and purchased an HDCP compliant HDTV. But did you, or the majority of other users out there consider this when purchasing their new TV or computer monitor?

Again, the reality is no one is affected. HDCP is more of a threat by the MPAA. So far they haven't implemented it, and I doubt they will unless things get out of hand piracy wise.

evilghost
11-03-06, 06:37 AM
Okay guys you convinced me. No more Vista for me.

I'll use Linux to play all my new and upcoming PC games. Oh wait...

I'll be playing UT2007 on Linux...

DataMatrix
11-03-06, 06:52 AM
I'll install it on how many devices I want, I don't have Microsoft telling me what to do with my software/hardware.

Monolyth
11-03-06, 09:11 AM
No offense to you as a developer, but I'm glad Vista is blocking certain hooking procedures.

Do you even know what you are talking about? Hooks can provide vital information, functionality, and streamlined code. Making it harder for 3rd party developers to get access to that functionality not only makes a program more complex (thus less stable), and less efficient ie. slower. Microsoft does not have to worry about these 'hooks' because they have access to source and can easily reference any libraries they need, while many other developers do not.

Think about how many 'non-Microsoft' applications you use on your machine, I bet you 85% of them will be affected by this change, and not to mention a change a month away from release of a major operating platform, that's just bad practices by Microsoft.

Zelda_fan
11-05-06, 01:18 AM
Do you even know what you are talking about? Hooks can provide vital information, functionality, and streamlined code. Making it harder for 3rd party developers to get access to that functionality not only makes a program more complex (thus less stable), and less efficient ie. slower. Microsoft does not have to worry about these 'hooks' because they have access to source and can easily reference any libraries they need, while many other developers do not.

Think about how many 'non-Microsoft' applications you use on your machine, I bet you 85% of them will be affected by this change, and not to mention a change a month away from release of a major operating platform, that's just bad practices by Microsoft.

On a business end, I use MS office (should work flawlessly) and various Adobe products (I've tested a few on Vista beta and I didn't find any real problems).

On a personal end, I use iTunes (which worked perfectly in the Vista beta) and a couple video games. There is no reason whatsoever that a video game needs to be useing hooking procedures so I don't see any problems.