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View Full Version : Yellow Screen appears in F.E.A.R.


kingjhj
12-06-06, 10:18 PM
http://www.parkoz.com/zboard/data/qna_nvidia/200612/0612_096299_DL3P3X1D5U_1.jpg

Hi.

Has anyone else in here seen yellow screen appears in F.E.A.R.?

I have tried many drivers like 97.02,97.28 and twicks..but nothing seems to solve this problem..

And system gets froze if i don't quite the game..


PS: When my system gets froze, I usually press restart button and it just shuts down and I can't turn it on at this time.. So I have to turn off the power switch at the back and turn on, then it boots..
Could it be a PSU problem?

PS2: But somehow, I could finish 3D mark 06 perfectly and got a fine mark..(around 12500..)
and couldn't handle Prime more than 30min..:P

Here's my system..
CPU: E6600 @ 3.2Ghz (V1.39)
Ram: Mushkin 6400 2Gb (1Gb ea)(V2.2)
M/B: P5W Dh Deluxe (MCH V1.6)
VGA: Asus 8800GTX (No O/C)
HDD: 80Gb X 2 Sata ll, 80Gb X 1 E-IDE
ODD: LG DVD,CD COMBO (Sata)
PSU: Antec True 2 480Watt

kingjhj
12-06-06, 10:21 PM
By the way, I'm using XP Pro...32bit..
My system is so unstable in these days..

robertonumeruno
12-06-06, 10:44 PM
Do you mean like Yellow blotches ON the screen or the game shuts off and the entire screen goes yellow?

SlieTheSecond
12-06-06, 10:44 PM
I'll take a stab at it. Anyone correct me if I am wrong.

a) But thats a dual rail PSU with 18A each? This card requires 30A

b) You are over clocking and it's unstable. Well incase you didn't see the obvious, try not overclocking and see what happens.

kingjhj
12-06-06, 11:26 PM
So it could be a PSU problem..
I guess my PSU has a dual rail(12V1,12V2)..

And it's time to change my PSU...:(

john19055
12-06-06, 11:28 PM
You do not have a powerful enough power supply for what you have,the 8800GTX needs 30amps by itself and you have a overclocked CPU not counting your harddrives and fans .

kingjhj
12-06-06, 11:48 PM
Damn...I totally become a noob when I have to deal with PSU issues..
Does it make it better if I buy a separate 'graphic card supply' instead of changing the psu?

sillyeagle
12-07-06, 06:33 AM
You do not have a powerful enough power supply for what you have,the 8800GTX needs 30amps by itself and you have a overclocked CPU not counting your harddrives and fans .


Thats actually not correct.

Nvidias minimum system requirement states 450w with 30A combined 12v current, they do not state that the card its self uses 30A, becuase the card does not.

He has over a 450w PSU and combined 12v current of 36A, so he is within nvidias requirement. They factor the whole system into that requirement, after all it is a minimum system requirement.

Dazz
12-07-06, 06:59 AM
Yeah thats what i thought too, looking on ASUS box it does not state that card it's self needs 30A which is why i wonder if my 700w 12v 15A x4 60A will work with an SLi 8800GTX.


However looking at his ystem he has 2 Optical drives and 3 hard drives so i would assume it's an power issue.

kingjhj
12-07-06, 01:42 PM
Sorry, The link had been deleted or something..
So..I attached the screen shot...

So, my antec true 2 480W is enough to handle 8800gtx but not for overclocking E6600 @ 3.2 with 8800gtx??
(I haven't overclock 8800GTX)

I have 3 Hdd, and one ODD..


PS: I thought even 400W can handle E6600 (obviously, no o/c) with 8800gtx..

SlieTheSecond
12-07-06, 02:40 PM
Thats actually not correct.

Nvidias minimum system requirement states 450w with 30A combined 12v current, they do not state that the card its self uses 30A, becuase the card does not.

He has over a 450w PSU and combined 12v current of 36A, so he is within nvidias requirement. They factor the whole system into that requirement, after all it is a minimum system requirement.

I was corrected on this a little while ago.

With dual rail you do not combine the amps. One rail is dedicated to the cpu. So he only has 18A to play with.

sillyeagle
12-07-06, 06:09 PM
I was corrected on this a little while ago.

With dual rail you do not combine the amps. One rail is dedicated to the cpu. So he only has 18A to play with.

There might be some accuracy to that but he is well over Nvidias requirements, and I'm sure Nvidia factored at least 2 HDDs and an optical drive into their requirement, not to mention a much more power hungry CPU that what he has.

They would have to assume somebody with a Dual Core AMD with two HDDs is going to buy the card based on their requirement, so with a Core 2 Duo I persoanlly think he is fine powerwise. G80's don't really use all that much power, not much more than a 1950XTX.

I'm not saying its definitly not a power issue, but I do think he has some headroom powerwise with his setup, since he has 17% more 12v AMPs than what nVidia states is required, which has to assume the most powr hungry CPU, which his is not. I don't think a third HDD is going to make that much of a difference.

Easy thing to do is disconnect the two extra HDDs and see if the issue goes away. With one HDD and one Optical there should not be any power issue at all with that system. Or so I think.

SlieTheSecond
12-07-06, 06:50 PM
The video card is recommended at 30A.

He has 18A to use. Which is almost half of what Nvidia recommends.

So really he has 40% less amps than recommended. Not 17% more.

jAkUp
12-07-06, 07:48 PM
His PSU should be fine.

He is using a PSu with dual +12v rails. 18A on each. The card recommends a 450w with 30A combined.

My guess is it is a bad card, try downclocking significantly and see if the problem still persists.

sillyeagle
12-07-06, 08:00 PM
The video card is recommended at 30A.

He has 18A to use. Which is almost half of what Nvidia recommends.

So really he has 40% less amps than recommended. Not 17% more.

Nvidias requirement states 30A combined 12v current. Key word is combined. He has 36A combined, which is 17% more than the stated requirement. And again 30A is not a video card only requirement, it is a full system requirement.

SlieTheSecond
12-07-06, 09:52 PM
Nvidias requirement states 30A combined 12v current. Key word is combined. He has 36A combined, which is 17% more than the stated requirement. And again 30A is not a video card only requirement, it is a full system requirement.

Yes I thought the same thing too. Until I was corrected on that. Dual rails don't count in that equation. You can not combine dual rails. You have one rail thats used by the cpu and the amps can not be shared. So you end up with one 18A rail for the cpu. And one 18amp rail for the rest. So he ends up having 18A for the video card. No more, regardless if his cpu uses up 1A.

If it was single, tri, quad that would be a different story.

glObalist
12-08-06, 03:34 AM
Yes I thought the same thing too. Until I was corrected on that. Dual rails don't count in that equation. You can not combine dual rails. You have one rail thats used by the cpu and the amps can not be shared. So you end up with one 18A rail for the cpu. And one 18amp rail for the rest. So he ends up having 18A for the video card. No more, regardless if his cpu uses up 1A.

If it was single, tri, quad that would be a different story.

Who told you that? There definately are PSUs where you CAN combine the two 12v lines, just like the seasonic ones for example. They're called additive rails. My PSU has 500W total sustained and 396W for the two 12v lines sustained output (396W/12V=33A). It's also specced to 17A one rail + 16A second rail = 33A for the same two 12v lines sustained output.

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article247-page2.html

SlieTheSecond
12-08-06, 11:15 AM
Who told you that? There definately are PSUs where you CAN combine the two 12v lines, just like the seasonic ones for example. They're called additive rails. My PSU has 500W total sustained and 396W for the two 12v lines sustained output (396W/12V=33A). It's also specced to 17A one rail + 16A second rail = 33A for the same two 12v lines sustained output.

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article247-page2.html


Last post at the bottom
http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=80718

Well there is a bunch in there.

If that is all BS and I am yet again in the wrong. I apologize.

john19055
12-08-06, 11:57 PM
I bought a brand new Antec True Power 480watts to run my system when I had a AMD cpu and just one 6800 ultra plus everthing was overclock and just two harddrives and I got random reboots and games locking up and soon as I bought a OCZ powerstrem all that stopped ,I may have just got a bad power supply but the 8800GTX should draw more power then the 6800ulta and maybe it is fine for his system ,but just because it has 18amps on both rails does not mean it will put out 36amps combined the review I saw said the max was 32amps when combined.IMO

pkirby11
12-09-06, 12:59 AM
For all you people arguing, single rail 12v lines are better than dual rail lines. You can not combine the amps per rail, so if you have 2 rails at 18 amps and the CPU takes 11 amps then one rail has 7 amps not usable.

I checked several sites, including one I trust most of all and that's PC Power and Coolings website. I've not been disapointed yet with there PSU's. When I had my x1900XTX in crossfire, there were users who weren't able to run those systems in 750 Watt or higher PSU yet my 510 Watt handled it like a charm. Single rails are better in my opinion and there seems to be some truth to that statement.

Here's the link:
http://www.pcpower.com/technology/myths/#8

"8. ARE MULTIPLE 12-VOLT RAILS BETTER THAN A SINGLE 12-VOLT RAIL?

With all the hype about multiple 12-volt rails (ads claim that two rails is better than one, five is better than four, etc.), you’d think it was a better design. Unfortunately, it’s not!

Here are the facts: A large, single 12-volt rail (without a 240VA limit) can transfer 100% of the 12-volt output from the PSU to the computer, while a multi-rail 12-volt design has distribution losses of up to 30% of the power supply’s rating. Those losses occur because power literally gets “trapped” on under-utilized rails. For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.

Since the maximum current from any one 12-volt rail of a multiple-rail PSU is limited to 20 amps (240VA / 12 volts = 20 amps), PCs with high-performance components that draw over 20 amps from the same rail are subject to over-current shutdowns. With power requirements for multiple processors and graphics cards continuing to grow, the multiple-rail design, with its 240VA limit per rail, is basically obsolete.

PC Power and Cooling is once again leading the industry on an important technical issue. All of our power supplies now feature a large, single 12-volt rail. The design complies with EPS12V specs (240VA limit is not a requirement) and the design is approved by all major safety agencies such as UL and TUV."

noko
12-09-06, 08:50 PM
I wonder if you can auctioner both rails together, hook them up together? If so then you should be able to get max amps out of both rails at once.