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View Full Version : Why didnt i find this in nvnews.net


Thing
03-04-03, 05:02 AM
Check this from techspot.com:

It seems like just yesterday that I was saving up for a new AGP style graphics card and DIMMs because the new motherboards that Pentium IIs took offered that graphics interface and didn't have SIMM slots. You know what its like in PC hardware. Things are out of date the moment you buy them, but now and again the whole motherboard is redesigned.
And that's exactly what Intel wants to do again with "Grantsdale", its new chipset design, currently expected to materialise in the fall of 2004.

Some of the changes one will see from the motherboards of today are as follows:

*AGP will be scrapped, in favour of the new PCI Express.
*There will be a new graphics core.
*A NewCard" expansion card format that will support wireless communications.
*The FSB will reach 800MHz!
*May NOT SUPPORT DDR266 RAM!!! But will support 4 DIMM slots.
*Regular PCI as legacy, as ISA was. Perhaps the odd slot included on some boards, but ultimately it will be phased out.
*A version of PCI Express will also be used as a new "HubLink" bus conecting the various components in the chipset.
*Grantsdale will also include four serial ATA ports, as well as a single channel of ATA-100.
*Almost certainly have at least eight USB 2.0 ports.

And, of course, much, much more

Http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,900185,00.asp

Maybe someone talked about this... maybe i just didnt find any post.

Dazz
03-05-03, 10:31 AM
If i recall it will support 800MHz (200x4) & 933MHz (233x4) FSB But yeah PCI express is said to offer 4GB/s bandwith. I never really expected the AGP port to be replaced so soon :(

Riptide
03-05-03, 02:26 PM
Originally posted by Dazz
If i recall it will support 800MHz (200x4) & 933MHz (233x4) FSB But yeah PCI express is said to offer 4GB/s bandwith. I never really expected the AGP port to be replaced so soon :(
Not sure if I'd call it "soon" though. We've been stuck with PCI for a long time now and AGP for several years. It's still at least a year away before the conversion over to PCI Express starts.

I can't wait to get rid of PCI. :D

Smokey
03-06-03, 01:46 PM
Well if we are going to be using TRUE 64bit OS, CPU, wont the rest of our hardware have to be 64bit also? I dont mean a 32/64bit OS, I mean true 64bit. I'm all new to this 64bit thing, but isnt XP a true 32bit OS, and doesnt support 16bit ISA?

Riptide
03-06-03, 03:27 PM
For full 64bit speed your drivers, OS, and the application you are running all need to be coded in 64bit and the hardware has to support it as well. As far as XP goes, I'm not sure there but I think it might have some 16bit emulation built in. You can use command from the run prompt and it opens a 16bit MS-DOS prompt.

Whether or not a 64bit OS could be made backwards compatible w/32bit drivers, apps, etc.. I imagine it could be. Someone else more knowledgeable might want to field that one though.

erwos
03-07-03, 08:51 AM
You don't need "64 bit" hardware (and what is that, anyways?) to run an x86-64 or IA-64 CPU. You will need to go through your code and make sure you weren't putting in stupid stuff like sizeof(int) == 4, though.

The Linux kernel and most of Xfree86 (all of it?) has the fixes now, so it's not entirely hard to do, and I imagine Microsoft is similarly ready.

-Erwos

Smokey
03-07-03, 02:46 PM
Originally posted by erwos
You don't need "64 bit" hardware (and what is that, anyways?) to run an x86-64 or IA-64 CPU. You will need to go through your code and make sure you weren't putting in stupid stuff like sizeof(int) == 4, though.

The Linux kernel and most of Xfree86 (all of it?) has the fixes now, so it's not entirely hard to do, and I imagine Microsoft is similarly ready.

-Erwos

When I say 64bit hardware, Im talking about all the add in cards on your motherboard, at the moment all new motherboards have pci slots and an agp slot, if im not mistaken these are all 32bit. ISA slots are a thing of the past and were 16bit, hense XP doesnt support isa slots as far as I understand.

sytaylor
03-08-03, 07:08 AM
A 32 bit processor can run any 16bit code, it just takes two passes if i remember correctley (maybe more) so its less efficient. So from the software side it should make no diff... but hardware I'm not sure about, XP is a true 32 bit OS, meaning it can't address RAM beyond 4gb and other limitations. Whether or not it can work with 64bit hardware probably depends on the drivers

SavagePaladin
03-09-03, 08:16 PM
64 bit OS and processors only really need 64 bit drivers...the hardware doesn't need to be changed.

PCI Express should kick butt for getting rid of system bottlenecks in several areas :) (addin cards, obviously the most notable)

erwos
03-10-03, 06:36 AM
Originally posted by Smokey
When I say 64bit hardware, Im talking about all the add in cards on your motherboard, at the moment all new motherboards have pci slots and an agp slot, if im not mistaken these are all 32bit. ISA slots are a thing of the past and were 16bit, hense XP doesnt support isa slots as far as I understand.
Win2K has roughly the same kernel as WinXP, yet it could run ISA stuff just fine IIRC. Certainly the Linux kernel has no such issues, and it's scalable across 32bit and 64bit architectures.

MS dropped ISA because they didn't want to waste resources on properly supporting it, not because it was technically infeasible to have it in WinXP. Has nothing at all to do with 32 bit vs 64 bit.

-Erwos

volt
03-10-03, 09:34 AM
There is a 64bit version of Windows XP. I'm sure it is made for 64bit hardware :)

Riptide
03-10-03, 10:24 AM
Well, at least ISA appears to be finally going away for good.

Makes me wonder if the new PCI express motherboards will have a single PCI 2.x slot for compatibility.

SavagePaladin
03-10-03, 11:36 AM
A dude from NV told me it'd be cost prohibitive to add any PCI support to a PCI Express mobo...
because PCI Express used a 4 layer design and PCI was 6, or something

erwos
03-10-03, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by volt
There is a 64bit version of Windows XP. I'm sure it is made for 64bit hardware :)
No, it's made for 64 bit CPUs. Hardware is a very general term. Some things _will_ need to be changed to support 64 bit CPUs properly. You _will_ need to recompile drivers and software and such. But existing peripherals will operate fine if that's done. The Alpha, for instance, is a 64 bit CPU, yet I can run my Radeon PCI perfectly fine on it.

I was under the impression (read somewhere, that is) that PCIE is backwards compatible with PCI. In exactly what fashion, I do not know.

-Erwos