PDA

View Full Version : Languages you know


Pages : 1 [2] 3 4 5 6

evilghost
01-02-07, 05:46 PM
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h43/karlagoudelock/thatsracist7vp1ju5gn3ny.gif

Actually, I just wanted to use that GIF.

CaptNKILL
01-03-07, 01:20 PM
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h43/karlagoudelock/thatsracist7vp1ju5gn3ny.gif

Actually, I just wanted to use that GIF.
I love that .gif. :lol:

nemecb
01-03-07, 02:09 PM
It's easy to learn a new programming language in a day or two, but then you can't use it because you don't know any libraries. I think it would be better to add the libraries and other knowlege to the list:
Yeah, good point. I doubt anybody writes anything in C++ without using some external libraries.

-C++ with QT, OpenGL, SDL (and several of its sub-libraries)
-Java, recently with Servlets
-Some PHP (and various other web stuff: HTML, JavaScript, DHTML, CSS, SSI...which is starting to stretch the definition of a language TBH)
-PERL
-Python with PyQT
-Smalltalk (And if I ever work somewhere that they ask me to use that awful, backwards, arbitrary, order of operations disrespecting language I will quit)
-Was introduced to ML and Prolog in school, but off the top of my head I couldn't write anything in them anymore.
-BASIC - probably still have more years of this than anything else because I started pretty young and didn't get into C++ until my senior year of high school.

|MaguS|
01-03-07, 03:00 PM
Yeah, good point. I doubt anybody writes anything in C++ without using some external libraries.


Thats why you gotta learn Assembly! Now thats a bitch... had to learn it for PS2 Development.

Subtestube
01-03-07, 03:13 PM
Thats why you gotta learn Assembly! Now thats a bitch... had to learn it for PS2 Development.

I'm curious to know how much you actually wrote in Assembly? In my own brief foray into PS2 dev I very rarely needed to look at Assembly - though I guess it depends on precisely what your role in the project is. I would've thought that even someone who was an 'expert' in that kind of field would only drop down to Assembly for some very specific optimisations, and to fix some of those annoying random idiosyncracies that the PS2 has.

EDIT 2: I should note that I'm definitely not proficient in assembly. I've enough experience to know how to find out what bits of assembly are doing, but I wouldn't trust myself to actually write large blocks of it. Even when GPU programming, which I've spent quite a bit of time doing back when I was doing research at Uni, I would use the higher level shading languages (Cg was my one of preference, but of course HLSL syntax is identical, and GLSL isn't really that different), as performance wise (from what I understand) the hit for a compiled shading language is pretty trivial compared to how much time it saves you writing the shaders themselves.

EDIT: It's also worthwhile noting that libraries are often 'first party' - so, I use a lot of libraries written by staff at the company I work for. Although I'm familiar with OpenGL, the glut, STL, and some of the unfortunately dying Renderware, and have dabbled in a number of others, I find that provided a library is well documented, it doesn't take all that long to learn one when you're actually required to work with something. In other words - when one has to work with something to actually achieve a task in a larger project, 'learning' it doesn't usually take as long as trying to teach one's-self something from scratch. Though I guess the sheer weight of time invested when actually working on something (rather than as a free time hobby) also contributes to that.

|MaguS|
01-03-07, 03:57 PM
I had to use it acouple of times, mainly when working on new engines. I did more AI and engine development. I never went into graphics too much, physics was another aspect I worked on (and often used Assembly). But you are right, I only used it if I had to take apart an engine to optimize it better (which is what I mainly did during my time at EA). I also had to learn it alot just so I knew how to read it, often I had to "clean" code (such a bitch job).

nemecb
01-03-07, 04:00 PM
Thats why you gotta learn Assembly! Now thats a bitch... had to learn it for PS2 Development.
Ugh, no thanks.:)

Actually we did a little bit of MIPS assembly in my architectures class so I guess I could say I've had an introduction, but MIPS is much easier than x86 from what I hear and considering how unlikely it is that I would ever code for a MIPS processor I'm not sure it counts. Back when I did BASIC a lot there was a bit of inline assembly for fast graphics routines as I recall as well, and the first graphical stuff I did in C++ used it as well (although that didn't work with a Windows compiler only with old DOS ones, so I quit doing that pretty quickly). So I guess it falls under the same category as ML and Prolog: I couldn't code my way out of a wet paper bag, but I have done it before.(help) (newb)

Subtestube
01-03-07, 05:39 PM
I couldn't code my way out of a wet paper bag, but I have done it before.(help) (newb)

I'd like to think that I could maybe get out of a wet paper bag with Assembly, but if it had any structural reinforcement at all (or was dry), or I had no reference manual - I'd be as stuck as you. Similar grade of experience for me. C++ all the way!

nemecb
01-03-07, 06:28 PM
Yeah, the thing is that even if I did manage to write some assembly, just writing it in C/C++ and letting the compiler optimize would probably be better than what I would come up with anyway, so it would kind of defeat the purpose.

wnd
01-06-07, 10:02 AM
Programming and natural languages combined:

Write for living:
C (e.g. with Gtk+2.x, Speex, SDL), Perl, sh, English (hard to believe eh), Finnish

Know quite well (would or did write for living):
Java (and JavaScript, including DOM with XHTML), PHP, SQL (experience with PostgreSQL, MySQL, Oracle in Perl, PHP, C)

Know to some degree:
C++, 6510/6502 assembler, mc680x0 assembler, Swedish

Absolute beginner:
Pascal, Lisp, tcl(/tk), Prolog, Japanese (after two years of relaxed studies at University)

Willing to learn:
Python, C++, OpenGL API, Chinese

The usual stuff:
BASIC (between 1983 - 1994, several dialects), (X)HTML, CSS

All this with vim (http://www.vim.org/) and most of it with free software.

Greg
01-07-07, 05:12 AM
I professionally use C++ and Lua. ...
I see you use Lua at work. If you like this and use it for games or tools, you might want to try out GameMonkey Script. It's like Lua, but designed specifically for C++ games/tools progammers.

GM Home:
http://www.somedude.net/gamemonkey/

Forum:
http://www.somedude.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=index&c=3

Subtestube
01-07-07, 02:19 PM
I see you use Lua at work. If you like this and use it for games or tools, you might want to try out GameMonkey Script. It's like Lua, but designed specifically for C++ games/tools progammers.

GM Home:
http://www.somedude.net/gamemonkey/

Forum:
http://www.somedude.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=index&c=3

Hehe - might be a good option, but I'm not senior enough in the company to make any kinds of decision regarding the languages we use. I may take a detailed look and mention it to our lead though - so cheers!

DaveW
01-07-07, 10:17 PM
Fluent in:

C#, VB.NET, TSQL, Javascript, VB, ASP/ASP.NET, HTML and CSS

Get by in:

Java, JSP, PL/SQL, Ruby, Python

I would like to re-learn C++ (Did it at university, but can't remember any of it now).

Clay
01-07-07, 11:23 PM
Fluent in:

C#, VB.NET, TSQL, Javascript, VB, ASP/ASP.NET, HTML and CSS

Get by in:

Java, JSP, PL/SQL, Ruby, Python

I would like to re-learn C++ (Did it at university, but can't remember any of it now).
What are your thoughts on Ruby and Python? I started going through this e-book (http://www.humblelittlerubybook.com/) on Ruby. Also thought about checking out IronPython. Would just like to hear your opinions.

DaveW
01-09-07, 09:39 AM
What are your thoughts on Ruby and Python? I started going through this e-book (http://www.humblelittlerubybook.com/) on Ruby. Also thought about checking out IronPython. Would just like to hear your opinions.

I use Ruby and Python mainly for testing other apps and scripting. Check out Watir for Ruby and Pamie for Python, they are great for unit-testing web apps and much much better than nUnit ASP.

Ruby is easy to learn, its quite intuitive except for its use of special characters. E.g.

variable_name
$variable_name
@variable_name
@@variable_name

Still, its not as bad as Perl... Perl programs look like some huge regular expression to me :)

Python is easy to learn too, the main oddity being its lack of implicit self. I still don't understand why the language is designed this way. I read theres some cool hacks you can do because of this, but I never got that deep with t he language.

I really like the fact that Python uses indentation instead of brackets etc. Most programmers freak when they here this, but once you've tried it you will find it makes perfect sense.

Clay
01-09-07, 07:00 PM
Thanks for the info. I've tried Watir before (saw it mentioned by Scott Hanselmann a couple of years ago).

rhink
01-09-07, 11:23 PM
Expert:
Java (yeah even I feel slightly dirty for learning this one, I like getting "close to the metal", and I think I've wasted more time trying to optimize the hell out of the garbage collector than it would have taken just to rewrite some components in C++ for performance, but Java is where the $$$ is for me atm).

Proficient:
C++
C
Visual Basic 6
Visual Basic .NET (I definitely feel unclean for touching this one, heh)

Can get by:
Motorolla 68k ASM
Perl
TI Basic :D

Meh:
x86 asm

Picking up new languages isn't difficult for the most part (at least once you're good in one), unless the programming model the new language uses is completely foreign to you. IE, going from a procedural language like C to Java takes some getting used to, especially if you're going to be any good at it (I've seen lots of Java code, and a decent amount of C++ code, that tries very very hard to make object code behave procedurally, and it gets messy, fast).

btw, HTML, XML, CSS, etc are NOT programming languages.

Clay
01-09-07, 11:34 PM
btw, HTML, XML, CSS, etc are NOT programming languages.That's no news flash, most of us already qualified those as scripting/markup languages.

rhink
01-09-07, 11:40 PM
That's no news flash, most of us already qualified those as scripting/markup languages.

/shrug, I saw several listing them as programming/scripting languages. It's kind of a pet peave of mine after a dumb-as-a-brick college english teacher trying to teach us HTML called it a programming language.

Clay
01-10-07, 12:00 AM
/shrug, I saw several listing them as programming/scripting languages. It's kind of a pet peave of mine after a dumb-as-a-brick college english teacher trying to teach us HTML called it a programming language.I know what you mean. Another thing that irks me is when people think JavaScript (a.k.a. LiveScript from Netscape) is either the same thing or even remotely related to Java.

evilghost
01-10-07, 08:42 AM
/shrug, I saw several listing them as programming/scripting languages. It's kind of a pet peave of mine after a dumb-as-a-brick college english teacher trying to teach us HTML called it a programming language.

Might as well add PERL and PHP to those since they are scripting languages but for the sake of argument there's really no point to get that hung up on semantics. :)

DaveW
01-10-07, 09:15 AM
btw, HTML, XML, CSS, etc are NOT programming languages.

You're right, but most people still list them under the "programming languages" section of their resume. The person interviewing you for a job of "web programmer" expects to see HTML and CSS there and probably doesn't understand the difference. Just how if they ask you "ever done any hacking?" the correct answer is "no", even though "hacking" doesn't really mean what they think it does.

Evilghost, the difference is that you can't do things like loops or conditional branching with HTML and CSS, you can with Perl and PHP.

I don't see the difference between a "programming" language and a "scripting" language, however.

evilghost
01-10-07, 09:17 AM
Evilghost, the difference is that you can't do things like loops or conditional branching with HTML and CSS, you can with Perl and PHP.

True, but by true definition HTML isn't a scripting language either, it's a markup language, but I do think it's worth listing. Dreamweaver/WYSIWYG != knowing HTML, and especially for web development knowing HTML should be a requirement for knowing PHP.

rhink
01-10-07, 09:27 AM
Evilghost, the difference is that you can't do things like loops or conditional branching with HTML and CSS, you can with Perl and PHP.

There's no program flow or execution whatsoever, just tags that describe various elements. A markup language is more of a standardized data storage convention, not a programming language of any type.

Though I have no problem calling scripting languages programming languages... you definitely write programs in them, you're usually just a little more restricted in what you can do, or the environments in which you can do it.

de><ta
01-10-07, 11:19 AM
High level:
C, C++, Java, C#, .NET, VB

Scripting:
Ruby/Rails, Python, PERL, PHP, SQL, HTML, CSS, JScript

Low level:
VHDL, Verilog, x86, x68, MIPS