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LabShark
01-27-07, 09:01 AM
32 bit?

Sorry for the lame question....

Gort
01-27-07, 09:07 AM
Yes, 32-bit. x64 for 64-bit windows.

Peter

LabShark
01-27-07, 09:10 AM
What happened to x32?

:D

nkostelnik
01-27-07, 09:13 AM
Here you go mate:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86

and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X64

:)

ViN86
01-27-07, 09:15 AM
Here you go mate:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86

and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X64

:)
wiki ftw :headbang:

LabShark
01-27-07, 09:22 AM
Wiki.....good call!

SLippe
01-27-07, 10:27 AM
wiki ftw :headbang:
That smiley cracks me up everytime! :rofl

Princess_Frosty
01-27-07, 11:53 AM
This is basically Intels naming structure for their CPU architecture, they all begin prefixed with 80 but are commonly refered to with just the last 3 digits, so 186, 286, 386. The 386 or 80368 (full name) are the 32bit CPU's we use today.

x86 refers to the whole family of architectures, "anything"86, basically where x can be any number or more generally refers to a range of numbers, we also see this when people want to talk about windows 95 or windows 98, people tend to put Win9x where the x could be either 5 or 8.

rhink
01-27-07, 01:39 PM
x86 usually refers to the instruction set architecture (ISA) these days.

It doesn't specify the "bitness" of the processor at all- 286 was x86, but 16 bit. Sometimes you'll see it qualified with say, x86-64 to specify bitness.

Gentle
01-30-07, 02:20 AM
The 386 or 80368 (full name) are the 32bit CPU's we use today.


The 80386 processor was released in the mid 1980's.

Gentle

Princess_Frosty
01-30-07, 03:26 AM
The 80386 processor was released in the mid 1980's.

Gentle

It's reference to the architecture type rather than any one specific CPU.

Frosty

NaitoSan
01-30-07, 04:59 AM
That smiley cracks me up everytime! :rofl
Haha here at Nvnews has some great smilies! :D

:headbang: