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nmdelrio
02-02-07, 10:45 AM
what's the difference?

Burner_Tbird2
02-02-07, 10:55 AM
Google is your Friend-

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=windows+quick+format+vs+full+format

Full- Performs a chkdsk scan for any bad sectors and fixes them.
Quick- Does not

nmdelrio
02-02-07, 11:49 AM
Google is your Friend-

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=windows+quick+format+vs+full+format

Full- Performs a chkdsk scan for any bad sectors and fixes them.
Quick- Does not

Thanks, I did Google and got the same result exactly as you have said.

Perhaps I should have been more specific with my question...

I was more interested in reliability issues (e.g., data integrity, maybe a real fully formatted hdd writes data more reliably).

I have been having this problem with a 500Gb hdd, partitioned 50/50 (G:\ and H:\). After a game freeze, I re-booted my Pc and after the reboot, my H:\ couldn't be recognized. I was able to easily recover the data with a data recovery program though.

When I tried to format the "corrupted" H:\, I couldn't, I get a format error message. I saved my data on G:\ to anoither drive and did a delete partition of both G:\ and H:\. I re-created 50/50 partitions but could not format them at first. After a few tried it worked.

Could this be one of the SATA problems (data corruption) about nForce chipsets I have been reading about. I can understand data corruption, but disappearing hdd is another thing.

Roadhog
02-02-07, 11:51 AM
im pretty sure quick doesn't "delete" anything, it just makes it look like its not there.

Tygerwoody
02-02-07, 11:55 AM
im pretty sure quick doesn't "delete" anything, it just makes it look like its not there.
wrong

quick format deletes just as good as full format. Full format is ONLY for error checking. Thats it.

nmdelrio
02-02-07, 12:06 PM
im pretty sure quick doesn't "delete" anything, it just makes it look like its not there

wrong

quick format deletes just as good as full format. Full format is ONLY for error checking. Thats it.

I think what Roadhog is trying to say is that, the files in a quick format are erased from the hdd "catalog" or "table of contents" (don't exactky know the correct computer lingo). But if you use a data recover program, they can still be recovered as long as they have not been written over by newer files. I have done data recovery many times with some success.

Full format for error checking, I can understand, that's why it takes a long time to complete.

Roadhog
02-02-07, 02:04 PM
I think what Roadhog is trying to say is that, the files in a quick format are erased from the hdd "catalog" or "table of contents" (don't exactky know the correct computer lingo). But if you use a data recover program, they can still be recovered as long as they have not been written over by newer files. I have done data recovery many times with some success.

Full format for error checking, I can understand, that's why it takes a long time to complete.

exactly what I meant. I can still recover every file from a hard drive ive quick formated.

EDIT: Proof here...

Next you need to format the drive, There are two methods of formatting, quick or complete. The quick format just wipes the file allocation table (list of file names and folders). It doesn't remove the data, just the file names. A full format will blank out the data, though with forensic techniques, the data can be retrieved.

Maybe why the regular format takes Ages?

Link: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1838698,00.asp

Burner_Tbird2
02-02-07, 03:06 PM
You can still recover files after a full format using data recovery software. Neither process overwrites 0's onto the newly blank space of the drive. Basically the ONLY time you should be using Quick Format is if you've just run a Full Reformat and want to format again right off the bat.

As far as your data corruption issues, IDK. It could be related to the nForce Sata errors but you'd most likely be experiencing these issues on your C: and windows install b/f any secondary data drives. If you are having problems and you only did quick formats on those new partitions I would try running "chkdsk /p" from windows recovery.

If you don't care about reformatting the drives then I'd think the sure fire solution would be to delete both partitions, do a full reformat to a single partition. Then if all goes well you can then reformat and repartition into two drives from within windows disk manager later. If I still had issues after that I'd be calling the manufacturer for an RMA #. :(

saturnotaku
02-02-07, 03:09 PM
Whenever I need to format a hard disk, I use KillDisk to write junk so that any data can't be recovered.

SlieTheSecond
02-02-07, 04:19 PM
Whenever I need to format a hard disk, I use KillDisk to write junk so that any data can't be recovered.


Data can still be recovered. There is only one 100% sure fire true way of making everything unrecoverable.

That is to take apart the hard drive and destroy the plater(s)

Inf1n1tyComplex
02-03-07, 09:22 AM
I prefer the use of fire with a hairspray can thrown in for added entertainment...

ericwss
12-25-08, 12:09 AM
All about the concept is enough, Here I will help you out after quick format and full format, any ideas about When to use quick format recovery (http://www.easeus.com/resource/quick-format-recovery.htm)and Recover Files after Quick Format of a Disk (http://www.easeus.com/resource/recover-quick-format.htm)

jeffmd
12-26-08, 12:42 AM
Use quick if you are just reformating to reinstall windows and start from scratch again. Security level: You don't care, you're reinstalling all your OS and games over it again anyways and its your computer

No real reason to use full any more. The majority of hard drives today automatically detect bad sectors, move data out of them if possible, and mark them unusable without the operating system knowing. Ontop of that, NTFS file system keeps better records and incomplete operations are never forgotten, so errors that chkdsk is usualy needed for are corrected during normal operation.

Formating for data wipes;

A single pass of a full 0 write would be safe for most, chances of recovery without cracking the drive open is very small because fragments of data missed due to drifting head alignments won't be picked up by the same head due to drifting head alignments. Security: Fine for moving to a secondary/family computer use.

Multi pass writes, or HD killers. Writes gibberish to the drive using many methods..many times. Ideal for when you plan to sell the hard drive or sell the computer the hard drive is in. Due to drifting head alignments it is not %100 unrecoverable, but unless the fbi thinks you are a terrorist, no ones going to spend the money needed to recover the data off one of these drives and anything close to %100 recovery is pretty unpossible.

The final method is not likely to harm a drive unless there is allready a defect in it just waiting for a nudge of abuse to cause it to break.