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Wolverine21
06-10-07, 11:25 AM
I have $550.00 to spend in gift money I got almost 3 months ago for a birthday gift. I decided to wait and see if there is a GeForce 8900GTS with the equivalent power of a GeForce 8800GTX, but with a die shrink that would output considerably less heat than the GeForce 8800GTX?

Is there a GeForce 8900 coming this summer out with equivalent specs of the current GeForce 8800GTX that will have a die shrink and run considerably cooler? Or did I waste my time waiting and should have just gone with the GeForce 8800GTX almost 3 months ago? I think I would be just fine with the GeForce 8800GTX in terms of heat output for my current cooling setup in my case, its just that I would prefer something that runs cooler that still gives the superb performance of a GeForce 8800GTX?

Also, how loud is the stock fan on the current EVGA GeForce 8800GTX when doing the highest resource intensive gaming? I want to make sure it is just as quiet as the NV Silencer 5 rev. 3 fan? And does the stock cooler for the eVGA GeForce 8800GTX blow hot air out of the back of the case, or does it recycle most of it back into the case. I want to make sure my next video card blows hot air out of the case and doesn't recycle it in the case like my NV Silencer 5 rev. 3 does.

Trademark
06-10-07, 01:49 PM
Well.. I can assure you the cooler is not loud and it blows quite a fair amount of heat out the back from the card. I doubt there will be a dieshrink, the G80 is fast enough for nvidia anyways.

It's most likely noisier than your silencer though, but performance comes at a price.

$n][pErMan
06-10-07, 01:56 PM
The 8800GTX is an amazing card and not loud at all (even with the fan at 100%). You will not be disapointed :)

Pagusas
06-10-07, 02:12 PM
Nvidia has been very quiet on any refreshes coming. My guess, and one many share around here, is that they will keep the 8800 line as it is now till the G92 line is ready for a Christmas launch. Why put the money into R&D and die shrinkage when you have another line coming out and your current cards outperform the competitor?

I think all the 8900 rummors we heard 4 months ago were true... but where dependant on what ATI had to offer. Nvidia probably though ATI was going to come out guns'a'blasing and take the performance crown, then Nvidia would counter with a full refresh in the 8900 serries. But once it became clear to them ATI was no threat, they move all their R&D to the G92 and released the Ultra as a little extra kick to insure the performance crown would stay on their heads.

ikjadoon
06-11-07, 09:27 AM
I hate it when this happens. :thumbdwn: When they have competing products, we get faster products at cheaper prices. But now, nVidia can bump the prices up without much ado.

~Ibrahim~

msxyz
06-11-07, 01:32 PM
Considering the lack of a strong competition from ATi (their GPUs are six months late and they perform slightly slower than their counterparts) NVidia feels no pressure to put out a new card. They might aim at a die shrink to reduce their costs, but that's all.

That's what competition for. And that's why it's important that industries like AMD stay in the business. And everyone should start hoping that their next CPUs and GPUs can give NVidia or Intel a run for their money otherwise we will be stuck with the same overpriced products for a long time.

J-Mag
06-11-07, 02:27 PM
Considering the lack of a strong competition from ATi (their GPUs are six months late and they perform slightly slower than their counterparts) NVidia feels no pressure to put out a new card. They might aim at a die shrink to reduce their costs, but that's all.

I think you've got tunnel vision on competitive pressure, but there is also internal pressure. Smart companies don't sit idly when they have little competition and I believe Huang is this way. He is no lackadaisical CEO.

Also, the next card won't just be a die shrink unless you consider the 7900gtx just a die shrink of the 7800gtx (which it isn't IMO).

msxyz
06-11-07, 02:56 PM
I think you've got tunnel vision on competitive pressure, but there is also internal pressure. Smart companies don't sit idly when they have little competition and I believe Huang is this way. He is no lackadaisical CEO.

Also, the next card won't just be a die shrink unless you consider the 7900gtx just a die shrink of the 7800gtx (which it isn't IMO).If a company is "smart" it will try to maximize profits and secure its position in other ways rather than making its own products obsolete too fast. Usually a company operating in a monopoly regime will exploit their products until the market is saturated and then force an upgrade cycle. Prices will fall very slowly, just enough to prevent the demand from drying up too quickly.

You've the great examples of Microsoft in the software business or Creative in the hardware one.

Just think for a moment what the scene might have been without AMD and its out the K6, K7 and Athlon 64 processors... We might be still stuck with some bulky descendant of the Pentium II. Funny thing that Core IS a Pentium II descendant but it took 10 years and a lot of money to realize how to improve the design... All because they weren't prepared to face a strong competitor (AMD used to build clones of Intel processors, first under license and after by tweaking the basic design enough so they could circumvent the royalties)

J-Mag
06-11-07, 03:27 PM
If a company is "smart" it will try to maximize profits and secure its position in other ways rather than making its own products obsolete too fast. Usually a company operating in a monopoly regime will exploit their products until the market is saturated and then force an upgrade cycle. Prices will fall very slowly, just enough to prevent the demand from drying up too quickly.

If companies solely focused on maximzing profits for the short term it could potentially hurt their longterm business, especially with Intel entering the market. Hopefully this means more money is spent on R&D for the next high end card than what is required by a simple shrink.

ikjadoon
06-12-07, 08:51 AM
If companies solely focused on maximzing profits for the short term it could potentially hurt their longterm business, especially with Intel entering the market. Hopefully this means more money is spent on R&D for the next high end card than what is required by a simple shrink.

Here is what I want. I want a series refresh with a die shrink, GDDR4, PCIe 2.0 and PCIe, and some work on lowering heat/power consumption (even if the die shrink helps with that, I want more research) by January 2008. That shouldn't be too hard, should it? So in the mean time, do whatever they did to make the 8800s, except do it better this time. :D This is for the 10000 cards or whatever. Isn't 10k just too big? It'll just get to confusing. They need a new naming system. GTX/GT/GTS are all good, but the numbers are getting a tad high,no?

~Ibrahim~

john19055
06-14-07, 04:09 PM
The fan on my 8800"s are very quiet,I do not even notice them,But the Radeon X1950XT I have sounds like a jet takeing off ,it is too loud.

ikjadoon
06-14-07, 05:36 PM
The fan on my 8800"s are very quiet,I do not even notice them,But the Radeon X1950XT I have sounds like a jet takeing off ,it is too loud.

The fan's are great, but hitting 80C (on any computer component that is actively cooled) on load is a bit alarming, no?

~Ibrahim~

Trademark
06-15-07, 05:32 AM
Not really, the G80 can take it

Vasot02
06-15-07, 06:29 AM
The 8800 GTX is a fine choice, quiet and faster from a X2900 XT
also
I do not think there will be a refresh in this summer but maybe after summer

ikjadoon
06-15-07, 09:40 AM
Not really, the G80 can take it

Just because they can take it doesn't mean that it is OK. Putting one of these in your room can quite possibly raise the temps. in the room overall (depending on room size, etc.), but just being possible is kind of freaky.

So, what's next? 130C, "as long as they can take it"? They currently expel around 55C of hot air. Do we want more of that?

What are the 8800's on? 90nm?

~Ibrahim~

Xion X2
06-15-07, 09:54 AM
Over the long haul, running 80+ C on a graphics card just isn't healthy for it. I can't tell you how many times I've heard of guys report artifacts after a year of owning a card, and when I asked what his temps were, "Oh, around 80-85C."

Over time, such heat just wears down the components. That's one reason I like to watercool these beasts.. they just run way too hot. Give me 50C temps over 80C any day.

ikjadoon
06-15-07, 10:10 AM
Over the long haul, running 80+ C on a graphics card just isn't healthy for it. I can't tell you how many times I've heard of guys report artifacts after a year of owning a card, and when I asked what his temps were, "Oh, around 80-85C."

Over time, such heat just wears down the components. That's one reason I like to watercool these beasts.. they just run way too hot. Give me 50C temps over 80C any day.

Exactly! That is why we need more research in this area for the next refresh so that everyone doesn't need H2O on their cards.

~Ibrahim~