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jcrox
09-05-07, 10:41 PM
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2937371&sku=ULT40070

1600w with 117a on the +12v :wtf:

Is this for powering a computer or a nuclear sub?

Joe Public
09-06-07, 03:19 AM
Probably nice if you have several computers you want to power off one PSU. :p

I do recall Thermaltake announcing a 2 kW PSU back some time. Not sure if that ever came to fruition.

Capt. Picard
09-06-07, 03:26 AM
I do recall Thermaltake announcing a 2 kW PSU back some time. Not sure if that ever came to fruition.

Imagine having two of them in one PC, if you have a large case.

Bearclaw
09-06-07, 12:09 PM
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2937371&sku=ULT40070

1600w with 117a on the +12v :wtf:

Is this for powering a computer or a nuclear sub?
LOL. It's made for a crysis machine.

Bman212121
09-06-07, 12:16 PM
Read the review on it a while ago. Here they are:

http://enthusiast.hardocp.com/article.html?art=MTM4MywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==

To make a quick note on the size, they originally showed a 2KW PSU at one of the shows, but as you'll read in the article they couldn't pass certification.


I am going to start with the power label here since it is by far the star of this entire review. That 12v figure of 117A is not a typo, this unit is really billed as having 117A available on the 12v rail. That single 117A 12v rail is good for ~88% of the units total DC output if a user could ever find a way to load it that much. We also see that the unit is capable of an additional 160w on the 5v/3.3v rails. Now come the caveats to these impressive specifications. This unit is capable of 16000w DC only if you are using the 20A NEMA 5-20R AC cable and have a dedicated 20A circuit. If you do not, the unit has a normal 15A NEMA 5-15 cable with a circuit breaker in it to keep the unit from drawing more than 15A AC. This limits the DC output of this unit to ~1200w-1300w DC but was necessary for safety approval by UL. While some people might be able to find clever ways around these limitations, HardOCP cannot stress enough that users should not attempt to circumvent this restriction in any way.


You'll have to have a dedicated 20A circuit if you want the full power of the PSU because after you figure in the efficiency you would overload the circuit.

Redeemed
09-06-07, 01:16 PM
Read the review on it a while ago. Here they are:

http://enthusiast.hardocp.com/article.html?art=MTM4MywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==

To make a quick note on the size, they originally showed a 2KW PSU at one of the shows, but as you'll read in the article they couldn't pass certification.



You'll have to have a dedicated 20A circuit if you want the full power of the PSU because after you figure in the efficiency you would overload the circuit.

The title said a 1600 watt PSU... hence I kind of overlooked this thread- but it appears that it is really a 16k watt psu- correct?

buffbiff21
09-06-07, 04:25 PM
YES. Now I can power my 6600GT without worrying if I have enough power.

Thanks, Ultra! :thumbsup:











Seriously, these things are getting a bit obsessive.

SOAD
09-06-07, 06:12 PM
YES. Now I can power my 6600GT without worrying if I have enough power.

Thanks, Ultra! :thumbsup:











Seriously, these things are getting a bit obsessive.


QFT!


Still unsure about my pentium3 pc though. Its a powerhouse ;)

nekrosoft13
09-06-07, 07:23 PM
ultra brand :|

**** keep that away from my system

Bman212121
09-07-07, 08:18 AM
The title said a 1600 watt PSU... hence I kind of overlooked this thread- but it appears that it is really a 16k watt psu- correct?

Uhh, no. It would be a 1.6KW PSU. 16,000 watts is enough to power your whole house. :eek: (133 Amps @ 120 V)