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View Full Version : How will telcos solve bandwidth problems of the future?


Capt. Picard
09-10-07, 05:21 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news108449464.html

Comcast has recently disconnected several users for downloading too much even though contractually they have unlimited access.
"Cable TV operators trying to satisfy the increasing bandwidth demands of HDTV customers feel very much like the thrifty grocer who tried to cram ten pounds of potatoes into a five-pound bag," ABI research director Stan Schatt said last month.

"The increasing bandwidth demands on cable operators will soon reach crisis stage, yet this is a ‘dirty little industry secret’ that no one talks about."
How will comm. companies solve our rapidly increasing bandwidth usage in the future?

retsam
09-10-07, 07:23 AM
this isnt so bad for the telco's but is a problem for the cable operators and there docsys type systems. if they dont go from a hcf type of system to one of pure fiber there bandwidth problems are only going to get worse over time, especially if verizon starts to transmit in 1080p.

jeffmd
09-10-07, 10:04 AM
Actually, the nice thing about fiber optics is you don't need to lay new lines to upgrade speeds. Upgrading to new lasers and repeater links work fine. But it all cost money, and comcast does not want to spend that money.

BrianG
09-10-07, 10:13 AM
this isnt so bad for the telco's but is a problem for the cable operators and there docsys type systems. if they dont go from a hcf type of system to one of pure fiber there bandwidth problems are only going to get worse over time, especially if verizon starts to transmit in 1080p.
Not exactly true.

The model of general broadcast channels will change. Converters, modems, VoIP terminals will all start to get their own "channels" Content will be hosted and stream to the customer individually. This is the concept for IPTV. When you change channels, you will be requesting a change in your stream on the device on its channel.

The barrier to this is the requirement, usually as part of a city franchise, that mandates a certain number of channels available to all users. These basic cable channels are broadcast in the lower frequencies that work well for reverse signal through the coax portion of the network. There will also be equipment changes, adding switching intelligence to service nodes. Most HFC cable companies are already using CWDM systems to increase capacity on the existing fiber to the node locations. We'll see.

BrianG
09-10-07, 10:22 AM
Actually, the nice thing about fiber optics is you don't need to lay new lines to upgrade speeds. Upgrading to new lasers and repeater links work fine. But it all cost money, and comcast does not want to spend that money.
Not exactly true, either.

Higher bandwidths require more exacting performance. 10Gb LAN-phy and WAN-phy links require metro SMF-28 fiber to be squeaky clean to prevent errors. You have to have clean connectors, low loss/reflection fusion splices, etc. to make sure you can pass the higher bandwidth services. The typical cable serving office is a roadside hut, not the best environmental conditions. Most HFC/FTTH networks use angle polish connectors that have less reflection but more attenuation. There will have to be several physical and philosophical changes from the carriers.

So yea, it is just money, but the existing infrastructure may not ever support the newer higher bandwidth services until the technology exists to go "dirty" on 10Gb.

XDanger
09-10-07, 03:59 PM
I was told by an ex telecom bloke that they are going to switch phone calls to a different system ,something about increasing the bandwidth in a tricky way with a magic box.
honest :)

I guess its some new type of encoding/decoding tomfoolery.

BrianG
09-10-07, 05:31 PM
I was told by an ex telecom bloke that they are going to switch phone calls to a different system ,something about increasing the bandwidth in a tricky way with a magic box.
honest :)

I guess its some new type of encoding/decoding tomfoolery.
So, this his comment was probably related to creating an EVL in the VoIP world. Typical voice line is based on a 56Kb bandwidth maximum, 64Kb with signalling. The EVL, equivalent voice line, usually runs on an 80Kb data stream for the added overhead of IP encapsulation. Soooo, the same phone line on POTS, or Plain Old Telephone Service, takes less bandwidth. You can compress voice over the VoIP network, but you usually end up with some oddities such as added lantency for encode/decode, awkward lack of the dead air sound, lack of self talk presence and other examples of things we have grown accustomed to with traditional service.

Funny thing, before some of the MPLS voice/data bundle gear we deploy included a white noise generation when no conversation was occuring, people were constantly asking, "are you still there?" It was a major complaint early on in the VoIP/EVL products. Instead of compressing the dead air, they inject white noise to emulate the dead air.

SOAD
09-10-07, 05:41 PM
no danger of this in ireland :rollseyes:

Stuck on 1mb internet isnt going to sap a country.


Downloading Quake Wars @ 4kps whoop de ****ing doo

six_storm
09-10-07, 05:50 PM
Comcast speeds are terrible anyways. I dunno how people are really "hogging bandwidth" with such slow speeds, much less why people would want to do it lol.

SOAD
09-10-07, 06:41 PM
at least there is no prob with piracy for me lol


Saw me a copy of Pirates of the carribean High def.

Started downloading. It would take 285 days to download if it was on all the time.

Cancelled it :D

ViN86
09-10-07, 07:59 PM
i thought they were doing it by using fiber for large amounts of traffic and having coax go into your home. is this wrong?

Rakeesh
09-10-07, 09:07 PM
Not exactly true.

The model of general broadcast channels will change. Converters, modems, VoIP terminals will all start to get their own "channels" Content will be hosted and stream to the customer individually. This is the concept for IPTV. When you change channels, you will be requesting a change in your stream on the device on its channel.

You are talking about SDV, which is actively being deployed right now, and is completely compatible with existing digital cable set top boxes. The only thing it isn't compatible with is currently existing cablecard devices.

Cablecards themselves are compatible with it on the other hand, just the device that the cablecard is plugged into needs to be able to send two way communication.

XDanger
09-11-07, 02:35 PM
A network is only as good as its weakest link

Usually being the user.:p

Monolyth
09-11-07, 02:51 PM
at least there is no prob with piracy for me lol


Saw me a copy of Pirates of the carribean High def.

Started downloading. It would take 285 days to download if it was on all the time.

Cancelled it :D

That and spiders have begun a take-over of the island...more at 6.

evilghost
09-11-07, 02:52 PM
To answer the thread subject's question, hopefully ISPs will boot every chittorrent user off their networks that are downloading 300GB of pirated content a month and cause bandwidth degradation issues on a daily basis.

Monolyth
09-11-07, 03:06 PM
To answer the thread subject's question, hopefully ISPs will boot every chittorrent user off their networks that are downloading 300GB of pirated content a month and cause bandwidth degradation issues on a daily basis.

Aye focus on the torrent folks...leave us Usenet users alone, teehee, teehee. :D