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View Full Version : Is 450psu eating 450watts all the time ?


HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 11:00 AM
Hi. I was just wondering.
I have 450 psu. Is it eating 450w of energy all the time or does it eat only how much it need at the moment?

And If I turn my pc off (dont unplugg cables) there is still some green led flashing on mobo. Is psu supplying this with 450w or again is it only eating as much watts how much is needed to power a led.

this might sound stupid but i think that psu eat full 450w(my psu is 450w) and converts this to how much needed....


Anyway. I am a bit confused:D ....what do you think

shabby
10-08-07, 11:13 AM
It uses only as much it needs to run the hardware, if it would run at 100% it would overheat and blow up your house...

HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 11:23 AM
haha .so I better not overload it :D

|JuiceZ|
10-08-07, 11:41 AM
No power supply is 100% efficient, even though more expensive ones.

HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 11:44 AM
No power supply is 100% efficient, even though more expensive ones.

What ? I dont understand...its good or bad ?

evilghost
10-08-07, 11:48 AM
The amount of heat in TDP dispersed by the power supply is also a direct factor in efficiency. You're converting AC power to DC so there's some loss, as evident by heat, which effects efficiency.

You can get a clamp-on ammeter to see how many watts you're using, remember, voltage * amperage = watts.

Tr1cK
10-08-07, 12:13 PM
A good UPS will also be able to show how much power you are drawing.

HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 12:21 PM
A good UPS will also be able to show how much power you are drawing.

not mine for sure:rolleyes:
i have chieftec450w

Mr Bigman
10-08-07, 01:14 PM
A 450 is good for when the system is running but with alot of things starting up like HD's and opicals and even fans its hard to bore it out to the desktop so yea 450 is good and can run vaerious devices but its the startup juice it needs to spin up things.

HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 01:28 PM
can someone anserw my question in the first post ?

mythy
10-08-07, 01:35 PM
? Your PSU is a 450W so at max output and considering its 80%% efficient then it could be drawing say 520W max. But keep in mind a PSU only uses what is needed by the system. When its off it uses very few watts for the Cmos ect. say maybe 3 ;)

evilghost
10-08-07, 01:40 PM
s/CMOS/WOL/g

wolfgar
10-08-07, 02:01 PM
can someone anserw my question in the first post ?

simple answer: no it doesn't draw that continuously.

the power supply will draw from the wall outlet enough current to run the equipment you have installed and are using from second to second.

so at idle it will use less, versus during high activity (gaming being one of the heaviest draws due to modern video cards) will use much more.

the 450, 500, or 600, (or whatever) rating is the maximum "theoretical" load that the PSU can supply to the computer components; if used in the best possible combination of components and usage. But in reality, its usually significantly less. Its gets complicated, 12 volt, 5 volt, max amps, multiple rails, and many more details. Then add in vendor differences in build quality which effect efficiency of converting drawn wall power to usable/stable available power (60-80% efficiency, with higher %'s being more efficient to run (electric bill)), but also more expensive to purchase.

my personal rule of thumb, try not to exceed 75% of the rated power. As you get closer to their upper limits, efficiency and stability drops. (like the difference of running your car regularly at 3000 rpm vs 6000 rpm)

The two biggest components draws are: video and CPU.

the higher end system you have/want, the better PSU you will need (total Amps and Quality). PSU's are often overlooked, but are the foundation to a good system.


How's that?

mythy
10-08-07, 02:07 PM
If your concerned about power just buy a 750Silencer from Pc power and cooling :D Trust me its silent and rock stable!

HiCZoK4
10-08-07, 04:07 PM
simple answer: no it doesn't draw that continuously.

the power supply will draw from the wall outlet enough current to run the equipment you have installed and are using from second to second.

so at idle it will use less, versus during high activity (gaming being one of the heaviest draws due to modern video cards) will use much more.

the 450, 500, or 600, (or whatever) rating is the maximum "theoretical" load that the PSU can supply to the computer components; if used in the best possible combination of components and usage. But in reality, its usually significantly less. Its gets complicated, 12 volt, 5 volt, max amps, multiple rails, and many more details. Then add in vendor differences in build quality which effect efficiency of converting drawn wall power to usable/stable available power (60-80% efficiency, with higher %'s being more efficient to run (electric bill)), but also more expensive to purchase.

my personal rule of thumb, try not to exceed 75% of the rated power. As you get closer to their upper limits, efficiency and stability drops. (like the difference of running your car regularly at 3000 rpm vs 6000 rpm)

The two biggest components draws are: video and CPU.

the higher end system you have/want, the better PSU you will need (total Amps and Quality). PSU's are often overlooked, but are the foundation to a good system.


How's that?

thanks !!! maybe this is why i get bsod in some games ? can you look at my pc below and say is my psu enough ? I dont have any neon lights or power plant attached :p
ps. I have only one dvd writer

wolfgar
10-08-07, 04:24 PM
thanks !!! maybe this is why i get bsod in some games ? can you look at my pc below and say is my psu enough ? I dont have any neon lights or power plant attached :p
ps. I have only one dvd writer


What Intel CPU??

I would guess you are probably close to the stable limit of your PSU, under stressful gaming, which is going to shorted its lifespan (and perhaps your whole system)

there are a lot of BSOD in the newest games these days. Any one specific?

Bioshock still gives me some problems. Its getting better with the latest NV drivers though.

any problems booting up, or sudden shutoffs?? Any overclocks?

I recently had a PSU start to fail (only 1 year old and a good name. It happens <shrug>), and replaced it with a single rail (30 amp 12 v) PC power and cooling 610.
(warning: this is a large unit. It was a pain to install into my existing system)

the current 1000+ amp units are way overkill. Just for bragging rights, IMHO.

HiCZoK4
10-09-07, 04:52 AM
I have no other problems with my pc. No freezes etc. Only stalker and Fear.

CaptNKILL
10-09-07, 06:01 AM
This is sort of OT, but how much would it cost to get one of those gadgets that you plug AC plugs into to measure their power draw?

I know ghost mentioned a clamp-on ammeter, but I don't have one of those, and it seems like less hassle to just get something that the cords can plug directly into.

ENU291
10-09-07, 07:29 AM
I have no other problems with my pc. No freezes etc. Only stalker and Fear.
If you only have issues with those two games then maybe it's a driver problem. In any case the PS is one of the most important components of a PC. If I were you I'd upgrade the PS ASAP. Get a quality brand name PS by companies like Corsair, Antec, OCZ, PP&C etc. With your specs I'd say something in the 550W range will work great.

HiCZoK4
10-09-07, 09:27 AM
isnt chieftec a brand psu ?

jeffmd
10-09-07, 09:34 AM
hicz, for a while now PC's have been using a switching PSU which means no, it is not using 450 watts all the time. Infact unless you have some hardcore cpu and/or Gpu, it probably rarly goes above half that. HDs, fans, and dvd drives are actually pretty insignificant with a current high quality PSU. The only thing we need to worry about now is pretty much our performance video cards, and if we have enough amps and rails to power them.

evilghost
10-09-07, 09:40 AM
AFAIK each stick of RAM consumes about 5W, your HDD about 15W. You can look up your CPU usage by looking at the TDP value for the CPU and this will give you a good ballpark for power usage during full load.