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Old 07-04-06, 11:53 AM   #4
TheTaz
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Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 621
Default Re: nForce4 Onboard sound card

When you ran the nvidia installer... did you do it a terminal window with sudo?

Or did you just double click the installer in the Nautilis file manager?

Whenever you install something for the system or 'all users'... you have to install it as the 'root user' (administrator). In ubuntu and most other distros, you predicate the command with sudo. That only works once per command.

So.... you get package by vendor... use Nautilis to 'un-tar' or 'unzip' (usually in your home directory)... open a terminal window and type:

cd /home/username/new_directory (or wherever the new directory may be located)

now for nvidia nforce you type

sudo sh NFORCE-Linux-xXX.-X.X-XXXX-pkg1.run

It will ask for your password, then Follow the installation prompts.

For software that you may have to compile....
it's
sudo ./config
then
sudo make
then
sudo make install

For running a graphic program as root.... the command is gksudo.

gksudo nautilis

Brings up a graphic password check, then a file manager with root user priveleges. (dangerous for a newbie)

Anyway... that last one you can add in an icon shortcut, and use a root nautilis to navigate around when you have to edit system files like /etc/modprobe.conf.

Ok... about editing modprobe... this is straght out of the nvidia documentation:
Quote:
Configuring the audio driver
SuSE
For SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 9, at the time of writing it isn't possible to use YaST to configure the nvsound audio driver. Following the instructions in other distributions to edit the configuration file /etc/modprobe.d/sound.
Red Hat
For Red Hat Enterprise Linux version 3, Red Hat 8, Red Hat 9 and Fedora Core 1, follow the instructions in other distributions to edit the configuration file /etc/modules.conf.

For Fedora Core 2 and later, follow the instructions in other distributions to edit the configuration file /etc/modprobe.conf.
Mandrake / Mandriva
At the time of writing, it isn't possible to use Mandrake Control Center to configure the nvsound audio driver.

Follow the instructions in other distributions to manually edit the configuration file. For Mandrake 10 or other Mandrake distributions running 2.6 kernels, the configuration file is /etc/modprobe.conf. For earlier distributions that run 2.4 kernels, the configuration file is /etc/modules.conf.
Other distributions
If the distribution you are using provides a configuration mechanism for audio drivers, use it to select the nvsound driver module for use with the nForce audio device. Otherwise, manually edit the module configuration file.

If your configuration file already contains an entry for the i810_audio or snd-intel8x0 drivers (open-source audio drivers that supports the nForce audio controller), that entry needs to be commented out with a # or removed:

# alias sound-slot-0 i810_audio

Add the following lines to the configuration file:

alias sound-slot-0 nvsound
alias snd-intel8x0 off
alias i810_audio off

On some distributions, you may need to replace sound-slot-0 with snd-card-0.

If you wish to have nvmixer audio settings automatically restored each time the nvsound driver loads, add the following lines to the configuration file for 2.4 kernels:

post-install nvsound sleep 1; /usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -L >/dev/null 2>&1 ||:
pre-remove nvsound /usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -S >/dev/null 2>&1 ||:

For 2.6 kernels:

install nvsound /sbin/modprobe --ignore-install nvsound ; sleep 1; /usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -L >/dev/null 2>&1 || :
remove nvsound { /usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -S >/dev/null 2>&1 || : ; }; /sbin/modprobe -r --ignore-remove nvsound

For both 2.4 and 2.6 kernels, you should add the following code to /etc/rc.d/init.d/halt, or /etc/init.d/halt.local on SuSE distributions. On Mandriva distributions, add the code at the end of function stop_mixer() in /etc/rc.d/init.d/sound.

if grep -q "\(nvsound\)" /proc/modules && [ -x /usr/bin/nvmix-reg ]; then
/usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -S >/dev/null 2>&1
fi

(In /etc/rc.d/init.d/halt, this code is best located next to any existing code that saves ALSA mixer settings.)

For Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, Fedora Core 3 and later, add the following line in /etc/rc.local:

/usr/bin/nvmix-reg -f /etc/nvmixrc -L >/dev/null 2>&1

Loading The Drivers

The installer may or may not leave the new modules loaded after the installation, depending on the existing configuration. You can force the module to be loaded using insmod or modprobe :

insmod <modulename>

or

modprobe <modulename>

On subsequent reboots, the modules should load automatically.

Hope that helped,

-Taz
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