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Old 07-24-03, 03:45 PM   #13
iplayfast
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But wasn't that comparing Apache 2.1 which wasn't released yet with code that had been around for years...

Anyways, I think these sorts of studies are very hard to do without biases, and I generally discount them all, and look for myself.
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Old 07-24-03, 11:26 PM   #14
gateway9550
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I would not agree with DrUberEgo completely .. ACPI specs was out for a long time .. Windows has excellent ACPI support for a long time now .. Why did it take Linux so long to get a working ACPI implementation?
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Old 07-25-03, 05:14 AM   #15
matthew
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Quote:
Originally posted by gateway9550
I would not agree with DrUberEgo completely .. ACPI specs was out for a long time .. Windows has excellent ACPI support for a long time now .. Why did it take Linux so long to get a working ACPI implementation?
'Cause the ACPI in Windows and the ACPI spec are two different things. Linux ACPI got done by a bunch of people who wanted to 'do it properly' and follow the spec, not be bug for bug compatable with the Redmond implementation.
Only guess what the hardware builders target for....
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Old 07-28-03, 12:11 PM   #16
udok
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nvidia gforce drivers are stable on 2.6.0-test kernels, or do they crash sometimes ?
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Old 09-01-03, 05:15 AM   #17
dahunt
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i'm itchy....
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Old 09-01-03, 12:33 PM   #18
iplayfast
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Quote:
Originally posted by udok
nvidia gforce drivers are stable on 2.6.0-test kernels, or do they crash sometimes ?
I've had good results so far. I have had crashes but I don't think it's nvidia related, and they are relativly rare. I drive my system hard, in both windows and linux, and windows crashes more often (again not nvidia related).
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Old 09-01-03, 04:48 PM   #19
dpw2atox
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im using kernel 2.6.0-test4-bk3 now and it runs beautiful on my system. Ive beend running the nvidia drivers since 2.6.0-test2 and had no problems with them except one crash on test2.
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Old 09-01-03, 05:16 PM   #20
udok
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since 07/28/2003, I tested a lot of 2.6 kernel and it works perfectly
now I run 2.6-test4-mm4, and it's paradize
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Old 09-02-03, 03:13 AM   #21
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Quote:
'Cause the ACPI in Windows and the ACPI spec are two different things. Linux ACPI got done by a bunch of people who wanted to 'do it properly' and follow the spec, not be bug for bug compatable with the Redmond implementation.
Only guess what the hardware builders target for....
But when you would ask for specs on the nVidia hardware, you would probably run into the same situation!
Of course there must be internal design docs, which may not be suitable for external publication without editing.
But then, there is probably a good informal contact between the hardware and software teams, so you would be at a definite disadvantage when writing a driver without access to inside information.

Remember a 3D video card is not something like a serial port or a USB controller. You will need a serious amount of code that drives a complex piece of hardware.
The nVidia people have a big advantage because they re-use their Windows driver code that has been debugged and optimized.

I think that a full release of hardware info and the plan to write a driver from scratch will put us back from where we are now.
There are always fewer coders willing to maintain a device driver for "today's great video card" (which will be a drag next year) than those working on generic kernel stuff and applications.
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Old 09-02-03, 03:37 AM   #22
i01
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I've been using linux for along time now, and I've ran into Nvidia hard alot. I like the Geforce4 video card but i dont like the drivers. I like that they work and work well. I don't like the way they install and fit into the system. It's much to difficult to uninstall them (yes ppl do switch video cards). I also dislike the nForce drivers and they just finally became actually source code and not cheap patches of the i810 (im not sure on the exact name) drivers. I also would like some open source so others can improve and help them fit into the entire linux system more cleanly. Unix has all about keeping standards and consistancy. The reason they should release the source or specs is a no brainer, the kernel hackers and developers of the kernel tree have much more time and expirence working with the kernel source and structure.

PS: floppy.c is faster then ATI drivers
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Old 09-02-03, 08:29 AM   #23
iplayfast
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Quote:
Originally posted by pe1chl
I think that a full release of hardware info and the plan to write a driver from scratch will put us back from where we are now.
There are always fewer coders willing to maintain a device driver for "today's great video card" (which will be a drag next year) than those working on generic kernel stuff and applications. [/b]
Nobody was talking about writting a driver from scratch. We were talking about making their drivers opensource. Then if people have a need they can handle it. They can also send their enhancements to nvidia for inclusion or rejection as they see fit. (just like the linux kernel).

Nvidia needs to realize that it makes it money off it's hardware, not it's software. So support the hardware!

Here's a thought. When Blender was a commercial program they couldn't sell many copies, even though it was great software. When they were going out of business they were approached on the idea of buying the software assets. They gave the figure of $100,000. A fund was set up and reached very quickly. Blender is now an open source project and has way more users then it ever did before.

So would nvidia like to add an extra $1,000,000 to their bottom line? Why not offer to open source the code for a price. I have a feeling people would be very willing to pay for it. Also nvidia will one-up ati.

Hey if you work for nvidia, pass this idea up the line!
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