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Old 10-23-07, 11:55 AM   #13
energyman76b
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

and Intel's drivers are not completly open too.

Some years ago they said, that they would open most of it, but 'critical' parts would be done in binary-only libraries.

If this libs don't exist, you are missing some features ...

btw, buying AMD as a german has a big advantage:

AMD produces in Germany
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Old 10-23-07, 12:14 PM   #14
pe1chl
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

AMD and Intel do not produce any videocards at all, so what difference does it make where they produce?
With those manufacturers you are limited to onboard video, which is useless for anything more than rudimentary office-use.
For any useful videocard you need an external video chipset with private RAM and two DVI connections. As long as Intel and AMD or the companies that buy from them do not produce any such card, it is useless that they release "open drivers".

For realworld videocards we still need to look at NVIDIA and ATI instead. Of those, NVIDIA makes the better drivers and products (not only for Linux, but for Windows as well). Sometimes ATI has a useful feature like RGsB or Component output, but they compensate for that by lacking drivers.
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Old 10-23-07, 12:26 PM   #15
energyman76b
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

If you buy a intel board, you have to use an intel cpu. That was my point.

With amd, you can use an amd cpu - and since amd produces in Germany.. well.. this is an argument pro AMD, when you see the stuff happening around Dresden thanks to AMD.

But yes, when it comes to add-on boards there is only the choice between ATI and NVIDIA. And Nvidia does work a lot better. Closed source or not.
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Old 10-23-07, 12:44 PM   #16
bgamari
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

@pe1chl:

AMD acquired ATI several months ago and at this point the branding change is complete. ATI == AMD (look at www.ati.com and find out for yourself).

Secondly, the notion that you "need" a discreet graphics card for "usable" performance is absurd. Sure, I certainly wouldn't want to run any extremely graphically intense games on an integrated chipset, but for the needs of the poster, it seems to be sufficient. The X3100 now has a full shader core and pretty reasonable performance for a composited desktop and perhaps some casual gaming off to the side. If the X3100 is fully capable of running the beheamoth that is Windows Vista, I'm more than certain it can take on compiz, especially given my past experience with compositing on intel chipsets.

- Ben
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Old 10-23-07, 12:56 PM   #17
matkoh
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

In my actual pc I have a NVidia-Card and have only little problems, when kernel or xorg is changed. So, if I had to choose between a ATI and a NVidia Card now, I choose the NVidia-Card for Linux.

But because I don't need an external graphics card for my needs, I will buy a mainboard with integrated graphic. I found the Gigabyte GA-G33M-S2H which also support HDMI. With that solution I have no driver problems in linux at all and although have all graphic power I need.

If a company produce in germany or not, has no effect to my decision. That can change to fast (see Siemens / BenQ).

Thank you all for your advises

Matthias
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Old 10-23-07, 04:24 PM   #18
starcannon
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Lightbulb Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

You would be fine with a 6600gt a great budget card everything just works even wine/cedega applications. If you want to go fast without the 8series headaches get a 7950gt, the 7950gt is my current favorite Linux GPU, I can do everything with it and wine/cedega apps at near native speeds. I have 2 of them SLi'd on my desktop. I'm using an 8400m GS on this laptop and have had nothing but problems with it, It works fine for Compiz/Beryl, but Wine/Cedega with World of Warcraft I have yet to figure it out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by matkoh
Hello,

I want to buy a new pc. I use it with opensuse 10.3 and want to use a 3D-Desktop (e.g. Compiz). I will not play with the pc and so I don't need a expensive graphics card. I prefer a silent solution (low noise fan or Heatpipe).

Can you suggest a NVidia-Graphics-Card, that meets my wishes?

Matthias
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Old 10-23-07, 04:29 PM   #19
zbiggy
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

Quote:
Originally Posted by energyman76b
But yes, when it comes to add-on boards there is only the choice between ATI and NVIDIA. And Nvidia does work a lot better. Closed source or not.
There are other GPU add-on boards on market. You forgot about S3 and Matrox. They are still making GPUs and boards. Both of them have Linux drivers.

S3 released Linux driver for its Chrome GPUs with OpenGL and MPEG-2 hw acceleration.

Matrox still provides OpenGL, X-Video for Parhelia and Pxx cards.

These companies still releases new products and Linux drivers are maintained and updated. The GPU world is not Nvidia/AMD divided (yet).
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Old 10-23-07, 04:41 PM   #20
pe1chl
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgamari
Secondly, the notion that you "need" a discreet graphics card for "usable" performance is absurd.
Did I mention performance? I don't think so.
What I require in a video solution is:
- two outputs (to drive two monitors or a monitor and a TV)
- DVI (to reasonably drive today's flatpanel monitors and TVs)
- private video RAM (to keep the system RAM bandwidth available to the CPU instead of the video refresh)

Those are things not related to (video) performance but still an absolute requirement for a usable video output. And rarely or never found on an onboard video solution.
It seems that all onboard video motherboard manufacturers still live in the age where a single VGA connector was the norm. I.e., 5 years ago. No, thanks.
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Old 10-23-07, 05:15 PM   #21
energyman76b
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

Quote:
Originally Posted by zbiggy
There are other GPU add-on boards on market. You forgot about S3 and Matrox. They are still making GPUs and boards. Both of them have Linux drivers.

S3 released Linux driver for its Chrome GPUs with OpenGL and MPEG-2 hw acceleration.

Matrox still provides OpenGL, X-Video for Parhelia and Pxx cards.

These companies still releases new products and Linux drivers are maintained and updated. The GPU world is not Nvidia/AMD divided (yet).
and the last time I checked you needed a closed source 'hal' for Parghelia&co to work. Is that still true? Besides... I would like to have a graphic solution with graphics power from this millenium - so S3 or Matrox are really not a choice.
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Old 10-23-07, 09:07 PM   #22
zbiggy
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

Quote:
Originally Posted by energyman76b
and the last time I checked you needed a closed source 'hal' for Parghelia&co to work. Is that still true? Besides... I would like to have a graphic solution with graphics power from this millenium - so S3 or Matrox are really not a choice.
hal is binary blob needed by open source mga driver for Gxx to activate advanced features like DVI or dual-head and other features.
for parhelia is only binary mtx driver.
Parhelia appeared on market in 2002 so it is from this millenium. Recently they made native PCI-E but cut down bus to 128bit. It is still very expensive. Do not know why. The funny thing is driver was released on June 29, 2007 and still supports max x.org 7.2. At 3D part it is on DX8.1 level.

S3 has DX9 class hardware so it is more up to date hardware (and runs Vista). Linux driver is from 09/05/2007 so young. S3 thinks about making DX10 and DX10.1 GPUs so do not say they are from past millennium.

Someone wrote there is no other GPUs present today on market so I made this post to show they are.
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Old 10-23-07, 09:21 PM   #23
energyman76b
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

Quote:
Originally Posted by zbiggy
hal is binary blob needed by open source mga driver for Gxx to activate advanced features like DVI or dual-head and other features.
for parhelia is only binary mtx driver.
Parhelia appeared on market in 2002 so it is from this millenium. Recently they made native PCI-E but cut down bus to 128bit. It is still very expensive. Do not know why. The funny thing is driver was released on June 29, 2007 and still supports max x.org 7.2. At 3D part it is on DX8.1 level.

S3 has DX9 class hardware so it is more up to date hardware (and runs Vista). Linux driver is from 09/05/2007 so young. S3 thinks about making DX10 and DX10.1 GPUs so do not say they are from past millennium.

Someone wrote there is no other GPUs present today on market so I made this post to show they are.
yeah the chips are from this millenium. Their performance is not. Parhelia was a very big disappointment for Matrox fans - after the disappointments called '450' and '550'. Each less performant than the card before.

And please, just it says it supports 'dx this' or 'dx that' says nothing about its performance - S3 is a good example, with no performance at all. NVIDIA itself has examples about this too! The 8400 supports DX10 *gasp* but it is a lot slower than a 7600, which only supports Dx9....
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Old 11-02-07, 09:36 PM   #24
starcannon
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Default Re: What NVidia-Card for Linux

I had an X3100 in a Dell Laptop, it was terrible, even worse than the 8400m GS, avoid the X3100 in my opinion, get a nice 7xxx gt you'll be very happy that way.

XFX 7950gt $189.99 at newegg
I run a pair of these in sli, bang for the buck this card is as good as it gets, mine has heat pipes, that said, be sure to have good ventilation, they do get a bit warm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgamari
I would go with an Intel integrated chipset (the X3100 has decent performance and open-source drivers). On the other hand, if you do wish to have something with better gaming performance, ATI's new cards should soon have full open-source drivers and specifications, and will more than meet your needs.

- Ben

Last edited by starcannon; 11-06-07 at 09:41 PM.
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