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Old 06-18-09, 01:25 PM   #1
miseryindeath
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Question Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Hello all. I'm a newb to all things Linux and now that I'm finally trying it, this little problem is really getting to me. I have searched these entire forums and looked on Google and can't find anything to help me solve this problem. So here it is.

I've installed Ubuntu 9.04 on a clean hard drive, installed it from within Windows on a different partition, installed it from within Windows on the same partition, all to the same effect. When installing within Windows, it installs everything just fine but upon rebooting and loading Ubuntu, it goes straight to a terminal screen where it asks for my username and password. If I install using the Ubuntu Live 9.04 CD, it takes me straight to that terminal. No GUI, anything. So I went back and used the Alternate CD. That actually installs fine after booting. Shows the GUI, installs, etc. However, it too defaults to the terminal screen asking for username and password after booting back up. If I enter the username and password, it tells me my last login date and at the end it says "on tty1." Underneath that, it says, "Linux Ubuntu 2.6.20-11-generic #42-Ubuntu SMP Fri Apr 17 01:50:03 UTC 2009 x86_6." And under that it has what appears to be copyright stuff. I'm not sure what else to put besides the specs of the laptop (yes, laptop). If anyone could help out, it would be VERY appreciated.

Sager NP9262 laptop
Intel Q9650 Core2Quad @ 3.0GHz
2 x nVidia 9800M GTX in SLi
3 x 320GB 7200 Hitachi Hard Drives
4GB Cruical RAM
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Old 06-18-09, 08:33 PM   #2
pauljohn
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

This is not really an Nvidia question, but rather an Ubuntu linux question. But I'm so glad to hear of someone escaping Windows, I want to help.

The first thing is:

Rejoice, Linux started. Go ahead, log in. Experience the joy of typing commands.

This is one of the cases in which the Ubuntu "we'll do everything, you are an idiot" approach is counter-productive. They got you 90% of the way home, but didn't help you with the last bit.

The fresh cd install does not put in the "nvidia" driver--that is a commercial, proprietary thing. If your X11 display worked, you could install the commercial driver with some menu pulldowns, but as it is you feel stuck. The live CD was probably running off the "vesa" generic or "nv" (not so great free driver for nvidia). You can probably get that running without too much trouble.

One command you can type is "startx" which is the way we always used to start the X11 server in the old days. Before MS Windows, lots of us used DOS and it was the same way--log in a black and white terminal, then start the graphical interface.

If "startx" produces a working display, awesome, we'll figure out why you don't get a graphical log in.

If you don't get an X11 server running, we'll have to figure out. Maybe you don't have the correct video driver for your video card.

Here's where you need to learn some fundamentals of interacting with your computer without pointing and clicking. I used to have an elementary guide for that, but I can't find it. You need to learn the effect of "ls" "ls -la" "cd /etc/X11" and "cat xorg.conf" (last two in that particular order). or "cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log". Learn to use an editor in the terminal. Perhaps "nano" will be the most understandable to a new user.

I expect that what has happened is that you did not get a correctly configured X11 driver, that's controlled by a file under /etc/X11/xorg.conf. perhaps it refers to the wrong device, or perhaps it does not even exist.

In the folder /var/log you should see some files that report messages on the system. File will be Xorg.0.log which you can read with a text editor like vi or nano or whatever you have installed.

You have not told us what driver you have installed, either. Here's the repository for Ubuntu version of the newest driver, which is the one I use. Drop the contents of the file into "/etc/apt/sources.list.d/nvidia-update.list" (can name file anything.list).

$ cat nvidia-update.list
deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates/ubuntu jaunty main
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates/ubuntu jaunty main

On that site, they have deb packages:
nvidia-180-kernel-source
nvidia-180-libvdpau
nvidia-180-modaliases
nvidia-glx-180

I think there's an updated xorg as well.

which you should install. That site has an encryption key that is used to verify authenticity of the packages. if you had that key already, you'd just type:

After that, type

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudp apt-get install

I'm not sure what will happen if you don't have the encryption key. Perhaps it will refuse, perhaps it will ask permission.

I don't know what you mean "2 x nVidia 9800M GTX in SLI".

I recall the problem that you might want to use Windows, and download files, and then use them in Linux. If your Linux side is setup with ntfs-3g it won't be trouble because Linux can access the windows partition. But that requires some setup. On the windows side, there is a program you can install to access the linux partition. I believe it is called iexplore or iexplorer. You can write me directly if you have questions pauljohn at ku.edu
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Old 06-19-09, 11:41 AM   #3
miseryindeath
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

I apologize, but you're going to have to extremely dumb terms for me, and I also apologize for not posting in the correct forum. Anyhow, I'm using Windows 7 currently and the latest Windows Mobile driver version which is 186.03. I'll go ahead and try the startx and see what that gives me and edit this post with the results. Also, the "2 x nVidia 9800M GTX in SLi" means that I have two (2) nVidia 9800 Mobile GTX video cards and am running them in SLi in Windows. I'm not sure if that would make a difference or not which is why I posted it. Hopefully that works and I can get into Linux and try it out and all that fun stuff. In the mean time, thank you for replying.

Sorry for editing so soon, but I realized I didn't express enough what I meant by putting things in stupid terms. As it stands, the only thing I understood out of your entire message was that I have to type in "startx" at the command menu and then after that, if it doesn't work, I have to type a whole bunch of other stuff and do this and that and I'm extremely confused by it all. I sincerely apologize and I do wish to learn, but I learn by show/do more then I do by tell/do so this is rather difficult for me. Again, I apologize.

Okay, I'm back again. This time to report that startx didn't work. It ran a bunch of stuff stopped for a second, ran some more stuff. In the last part it said something like, "Fatal screen error: Display not dectected." Not sure of the exact wording but I'm sure that's pretty dang close. What to do now?

No one? Anything to help out? Kind of wanting to use/try it out and am pretty stuck as I'm an idiot when it comes to console commands and all that...
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Old 06-20-09, 10:52 AM   #4
olifre
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Hello!

To provide further help, it would be nice to know which graphics-driver your ubuntu tries to load. You can get this information using:

cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver

What this will exactly do: "cat" is a command that reads in a file and outputs its contents. We want to have a look at the file "/etc/X11/xorg.conf", because this is where the X-Server (X is the "thing" that you would normally see, en environment where you can click, have graphics, fancy menus and everything) stores its configuration.
The second part of the command begins with a "pipe", this is the vertical bar, which is one of the most wonderful things you can have on terminal. If you just typed "cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf" and pressed enter, you would see the whole file on your terminal. The pipe, however, takes the stuff you would normally see and gives all the text to the command after it.
This command is "grep". Grep takes all the text and looks for something in it, and for we are searching for the lines concerning the graphics-driver, we filter for "driver". The "-i" just makes the search case-independent.
So why am I explaining all this in detail? Because you might need more commands like this, and you have to understand the basic structure. If you understood this one, you already got most of it ;-).

Next thing I would recomment is learning how to navigate in folders. You use "cd foldername" to enter the subfolder "foldername", and "cd .." to go back to the folder above it. You do not have to type the whole foldername, you can also type "folde" and press TAB, which will automagically complete it ;-).
Now, when you login, you are normally in your home-folder, which is where you keep all you personal settings and files. Here, you can also figure out how to use an editor, for example, "nano". Just enter "nano myfirsttextfile.txt" and you can edit this textfile. Play around a bit with nano, some of the commands you can use are shown at the bottom, while "^X" for example means, you have to press "ctrl+x" to exit.

So, what we need to continue is the output of
cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver
and maybe something more of the output "startx" generates when you try to start it (maybe take a photo or something?).
After you posted that, we will know which video-driver you are using. Then I (or someone else) can give you further instructions on changing it using "nano" in the config-file we just had a look at (/etc/X11/xorg.conf) and hopefully be able to start X.
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Old 06-20-09, 01:33 PM   #5
miseryindeath
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Quote:
Originally Posted by olifre View Post
Hello!

To provide further help, it would be nice to know which graphics-driver your ubuntu tries to load. You can get this information using:

cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver

What this will exactly do: "cat" is a command that reads in a file and outputs its contents. We want to have a look at the file "/etc/X11/xorg.conf", because this is where the X-Server (X is the "thing" that you would normally see, en environment where you can click, have graphics, fancy menus and everything) stores its configuration.
The second part of the command begins with a "pipe", this is the vertical bar, which is one of the most wonderful things you can have on terminal. If you just typed "cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf" and pressed enter, you would see the whole file on your terminal. The pipe, however, takes the stuff you would normally see and gives all the text to the command after it.
This command is "grep". Grep takes all the text and looks for something in it, and for we are searching for the lines concerning the graphics-driver, we filter for "driver". The "-i" just makes the search case-independent.
So why am I explaining all this in detail? Because you might need more commands like this, and you have to understand the basic structure. If you understood this one, you already got most of it ;-).

Next thing I would recomment is learning how to navigate in folders. You use "cd foldername" to enter the subfolder "foldername", and "cd .." to go back to the folder above it. You do not have to type the whole foldername, you can also type "folde" and press TAB, which will automagically complete it ;-).
Now, when you login, you are normally in your home-folder, which is where you keep all you personal settings and files. Here, you can also figure out how to use an editor, for example, "nano". Just enter "nano myfirsttextfile.txt" and you can edit this textfile. Play around a bit with nano, some of the commands you can use are shown at the bottom, while "^X" for example means, you have to press "ctrl+x" to exit.

So, what we need to continue is the output of
cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver
and maybe something more of the output "startx" generates when you try to start it (maybe take a photo or something?).
After you posted that, we will know which video-driver you are using. Then I (or someone else) can give you further instructions on changing it using "nano" in the config-file we just had a look at (/etc/X11/xorg.conf) and hopefully be able to start X.
First off, apologize for quoting. Just helps me remember what to respond to. Anyhow, moving on.

As for the "startx" command, the last part of what it says after typing in the command is:
Fatal server error:
no screen found

Above that, it says:
Primary device is not PCI
(EE) No devices detected



As far as the cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver command, it didn't work for me. I had to take the | grep -i driver part out for anything to happen. When using the entire command, it just went to a line for me to type stuff in. Nothing happened. The | is shift + \ correct? If so, I'm typing it exactly as typed and nothing is happening. I'm beginning to get highly frustrated.

I'm not sure if it's of any relevence or not, but I installed this just fine in a VM in Windows. It installed correctly, went straight to the desktop and everything, which is one reason I'm so perplexed. As far as installing Linux drivers for my video card, how would I even do that without an interface to use? Obviously I'm quite "new school" in that regard.
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Old 06-20-09, 01:57 PM   #6
olifre
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Hello again!

Quote:
Originally Posted by miseryindeath View Post
Primary device is not PCI
(EE) No devices detected
Mhm. Let's see:
Quote:
Originally Posted by miseryindeath View Post
As far as the cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver command, it didn't work for me. I had to take the | grep -i driver part out for anything to happen. When using the entire command, it just went to a line for me to type stuff in. Nothing happened. The | is shift + \ correct?
It did not output anything, so it seems your xorg.conf does not contain ANY driver-line. This is not the way things should be. That means, ubuntu seems not to have even tried to configure your card...
You can force reconfiguring by using:
sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
Ubuntu will then ask for your superuser-password (which is your normal user-password) and then reconfigure the package xserver-xorg (which should give you some kind of dialog and finally generate a new xorg.conf). You may then retry
cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf | grep -i driver
(you were correct with " shift + \ ") and see if it outputs something. Finally, you should try:
startx
and hopefully get some (maybe with bad resolution and unaccellerated) graphics working.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miseryindeath View Post
I'm not sure if it's of any relevence or not, but I installed this just fine in a VM in Windows. It installed correctly, went straight to the desktop and everything, which is one reason I'm so perplexed.
This should work nicely, because Ubuntu has drivers for the Graphics Adapter the VM offers. The VM does not present you graphics-adapter to the installed system, but emulate a very simple one and then "hands graphics through" to your Windows.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miseryindeath View Post
As far as installing Linux drivers for my video card, how would I even do that without an interface to use? Obviously I'm quite "new school" in that regard.
Well, the interface is right in front of you ^^. You can do that all in terminal, in fact, some Linux distributions are shipped without anything "graphical" and you start working on terminal ^^.
As for installing new graphics-drivers: First, you must have network-access. Easiest way to do so is attaching a network-cable to your router and the notebook, for WLAN-configuration is a bit more work (especially with Ubuntu, when there is no graphics). You should immediately have network access, try to ping google:
ping www.google.de
If you get a positive result (no package loss), you have a network connection.
Then you can update your system:
sudo apt-get update
and then install the newly found updates:
sudo apt-get upgrade
Your system will then be upgraded to the latest packages. It might be worth another try if graphics is working after a reboot...
If not, pauljohn gave you some instructions to easily install the newest graphics-drivers for Ubuntu. Here they are in compressed form:
1) Start nano and edit your list of packages (which ubuntu will check for updates):
sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list.d/nvidia-update.list
2) Put in the following lines:
deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates/ubuntu jaunty main
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates/ubuntu jaunty main
3) Save and close nano.
4)
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

Then, you will have the newest nvidia-drivers installed. They will also update automatically later on by just using step 4 (or you get a message in the graphical interface that there are updates available ^^).
If graphics still won't work, retry
sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
because it should now detect the new driver and use it. If even that does not work, check back here and post your results - we should then edit your xorg.conf manually ^^.

Good luck!
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Old 06-20-09, 02:27 PM   #7
miseryindeath
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Well, first thing I tried was sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg and all that went with it. No luck there. I tried updating/installing the drivers using nano like you said (I have no wired internet) and also to no avail. I'm really stuck here.

Oh, I forgot to mention, I also did the grep thing and startx after the dpkg reconfigure to no avail. Which was probably already obvious to you but I figured I'd mention it.
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Old 06-20-09, 03:51 PM   #8
olifre
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Without a wired connection, this might be some longer process...
You should download:
https://edge.launchpad.net/~ubuntu-x...untu1_i386.deb
https://edge.launchpad.net/~ubuntu-x...untu1_i386.deb
https://edge.launchpad.net/~ubuntu-x...untu1_i386.deb

And copy those on your Windows-Drive (preferrably simply on C:\).
Then you should be able to install these with ubuntu:
cd /media/
ls
The last line will show you which folders are in /media/. There should be something like "Windows", but maybe it is just called "sda2" or something. Just "cd sda2" into it, and use "ls" to see whether the files are in there (if there are too many files, try "ls | grep nvidia").
If you chose the correct directory, use
sudo dpkg -i nvidia-something
for all the packages.
However, it might be that those packages need other packages to install - and then you would need to be online...
Good luck, however!
Or might there be some friend with a wired network?
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Old 06-20-09, 04:38 PM   #9
miseryindeath
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Okay, so after downloading the files and putting them on DIRECTLY on my C: drive (so it would read C:\xxx) and rebooting and getting back to the control panel, I typed cd /media/ followed by the ls command. All that brought up was cdrom and cdrom0. Did I miss something here? Again, I would like to apologize for my complete lack of any understanding whatsoever. I'm sure it must be frustrating trying to figure out a problem you can't see, but I do appreciate the effort.

Not sure if it a makes a difference, but "cdrom" is in a light/powder blue color and "cdrom0" is in a purple color.
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Old 06-21-09, 08:16 AM   #10
olifre
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Hello again!

Well, then Ubuntu did not "mount" the Windows-drives automatically (that means, they are not opened for reading and writing).
So we have to do this manually.
You should be able to do:
sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda
Be careful with this command! Just use it with that parameter -l (which is a small -L), then it will just list the partitions on your drive. If you do not use the parameter, the program starts and you can change the partitioning of your drive (which you certainly do not want).
The list will then show you something like:
Device: boot. Begin End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 12 2344+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
and maybe many more lines. You have to search for your windows-partition here, it should show "HPFS/NTFS" in the system-column. If there are more than one, you have to look for the appropriate size, say, your windows-drive C: is the biggest one, then the right line is that one with the largest amount of blocks.
What you need is the "Device" of that line. Then, next thing you should do is:
mkdir mnt
sudo mount /dev/sda1 mnt
(replace sda1 with the device you found in the list above)
What this will do:
It will make a new directory called "mnt" in the directory you are currently in (which will be your home-directory). Then, it will "map" the windows-drive into that directory. So, if everything went well, you can do:
cd mnt
sudo dpkg -i nvidia-something
Ubuntu should automatically choose the correct options for "mounting" the windows-drive. If something complains, just check back here ^^.
Good luck!

EDIT: The colors show that these two "folders" were different file-types. In fact, "cdrom" is just a "link" to cdrom0. This is somewhat similar the the junction-links Windows Vista is using everywhere (if you are not using the native US version), like the folder "program files", which exists in every installation in every language - the language-specific folder is just a link to it ^^.
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Old 06-21-09, 03:32 PM   #11
AndersBP
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Your problem might very well be that the x server doesn't know on which pci slot to put the screen driver.
Try typing:
/sbin/lspci | grep -i vga

In my case I get following:

05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation Device 05e0 (rev a1)
09:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation Device 05e0 (rev a1)

In your xorg.conf file under "device" add this line

Busid "PCI:5:0:0"

X should start normal now

cheers

Anders
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Old 06-22-09, 01:12 PM   #12
miseryindeath
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Default Re: Ubuntu 9.04 boots to terminal - 9800M GTX

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndersBP View Post
Your problem might very well be that the x server doesn't know on which pci slot to put the screen driver.
Try typing:
/sbin/lspci | grep -i vga

In my case I get following:

05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation Device 05e0 (rev a1)
09:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation Device 05e0 (rev a1)

In your xorg.conf file under "device" add this line

Busid "PCI:5:0:0"

X should start normal now

cheers

Anders
Well, I would give this a shot except for the fact that I have no idea how to edit the xorg.conf file.

Also, mounting the drive (which was sda2 in my case) didn't work either. After mounting it and going to the place as described, I typed "ls" just to see what came up and it was stuff such as boot, bootmgr, etc. Not sure what that means, but either way, trying to install the files that way didn't work. Not sure what to do now.
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