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Old 10-06-03, 09:39 AM   #13
Spark
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Just accidently read your thread. The sympton sounds similar if not identical to this one. May you want to check whether that helps.
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Old 10-06-03, 10:12 AM   #14
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It does some similar, but there are a few notable differences:

1. When my screen locks, I get niether the nvidia logo nor a mouse cursor. I just go from the boot output to a black screen.

2. When I use the soft-reboot method, everything works fine. It doesn't lock up after any period of time, the system is working just as I would hope it would.

I went ahead and tried re-installing the drivers with the "-n" option. It seems to have made no difference at all.

Paul
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Old 10-06-03, 11:25 AM   #15
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Too bad.

You said "if I instead boot to Windows or another Kernel that doesn't load X".

What do you mean exactly? Do you have to start Windows until Windows enables a hires graphics mode, or is it sufficient to just have it boot a little and then kill it (yes that's evil)?

What is the behaviour if

- you cold-start your current kernel, but not X, then warm-reboot and start X this time (with the new driver)

- you cold-start your current kernel, X using the nv driver, then warm-reboot and start X

- you cold-start an older kernel, but use the current drivers?

Have you tried commenting out all those extra options in XF86conf, like BusID, VideoRam, etc.? Just to be sure...
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Old 10-06-03, 12:39 PM   #16
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This took a little while to test, as it involved lots of rebooting. But, here are the results at last:

Quote:
What do you mean exactly? Do you have to start Windows until Windows enables a hires graphics mode, or is it sufficient to just have it boot a little and then kill it (yes that's evil)?
Well, I reboot as soon as I get the login screen. I don't think it's in a hires mode yet, but I'm not 100% sure on that. I've tried giving it the three-finger-salute (ctrl-alt-del) earlier in the process, but Windows seems to be ignoring the keystroke. Bloody windows...

Quote:
- you cold-start your current kernel, but not X, then warm-reboot and start X this time (with the new driver)
Nope, that doesn't work.

Quote:
- you cold-start your current kernel, X using the nv driver, then warm-reboot and start X
Nope again. I tried both the 'nv' and the 'vesa' drivers, and neither one worked. I'll point out that I've never been able to get the 'nv' drivers to work properly. I always get a tiny desktop centered in a large resolution screen. Then when I exit X, the text display is all garbled.

Quote:
- you cold-start an older kernel, but use the current drivers?
I can't use the current drivers in an older kernel, I need ACPI running or my video card doesn't get a proper IRQ.

Well, let me know if that sheds any light.

Paul
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Old 10-06-03, 02:25 PM   #17
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hmm. I now see it in the light of utter hopelessness. :-\

I would guess that your mainboard does less than it should (since Windows can correctly initialize the graphics card, Linux can't). What's your chipset?
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Old 10-06-03, 03:08 PM   #18
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It's an SiS. I don't know the exact number, I'll have to check the documentation when I get home.

What I'd really like to know though is whether this is a problem with the NVidia drivers, or a problem with the kernel.

Paul
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Old 10-06-03, 03:34 PM   #19
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Some more food for thought:

I tried using the older (4363) drivers instead, and it only got worse. In this case, I got exactly the same results as before, only now in the one case where I expect things to work, they don't. Instead I get the NVidia logo, followed by a blank white screen with the mouse cursor. Sounds like that problem the other guys were having, no? Only my screen is frozen at white, not black.

Also, you said:
Quote:
Windows can correctly initialize the graphics card, Linux can't
This struck me as wrong at first, as I was fairly sure I could do the following: cold-boot into an older kernel that doesn't have the nvidia dirvers installed on it causing X to fail when entering init level 5 (the XF86Config still points to the nvidia drivers). Then do a warm reboot into the latest kernel which has the nvidia drivers installed. This, I thought, should make it work without having ever loaded Windows.

I just tested exatly that, and it appears I was wrong. It does not work. So what the heck is Windows doing that Linux is not? And again, is this a problem with ACPI (kernel level) or the video drivers? Is it perhaps time I visited the ACPI4Linux forums?

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Old 10-06-03, 10:22 PM   #20
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I don't understand what ACPI has to do with all this, that is just a power managment interface, am I wrong? I don't see a conexion with Video drivers and the kernel.
correct me if I'm wrong
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Old 10-06-03, 11:11 PM   #21
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Actually, ACPI is a system configuration interface for the OS. It allows the OS to handle IRQs and such for PCI devices, as well as handle some lower level things the BIOS normally handles. But yes, it is also a power management interface
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Old 10-08-03, 01:37 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by Reeve
Actually, ACPI is a system configuration interface for the OS. It allows the OS to handle IRQs and such for PCI devices, as well as handle some lower level things the BIOS normally handles. But yes, it is also a power management interface
Ummm, are you sure you're thinking of ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) and not APIC (Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller)?
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Old 10-08-03, 05:25 AM   #23
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Yes, I'm sure. APIC allows the OS more fine-tuned control over creating interrupt requests, as well as helping the OS utilize multiple processors. ACPI allows the OS to assign IRQs to devices. That (among other things) is the "Configuration" part of ACPI
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Old 11-20-03, 09:25 AM   #24
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I finally got things working on this machine, and I figured I'd follow through and post my findings just in case it's helpful to someone else.

To recap, I'm running on an Alienware Area 51m, with the 15.4" WSXGA+ screen and an nVidia FX5600 Go card. I was using RedHat 9 with a self-compiled 2.4.22 kernel. I tried upgrading to Fedora Core, but had many problems, and am now running Mandrake 9.2.

I got things working using the nv driver by following martin.christen's directions here:
http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/show...hlight=nvdrv.o

I also had to get different modelines, which I was able to generate using the following site:
http://xtiming.sourceforge.net/cgi-bin/xtiming.pl

So I had it working in full 1680x1050 glory, but I had no hardware acceleration (OpenGL apps just wouldn't run) and piss poor framerate in everything else.

Finally, after much experimentation, I was able to get it to work using nVidia's 1.0-4496 drivers by setting the following option in my XF86Config-4:
Option "NvAgp" "0"

Without the above setting, or by using a value of 3 or 4 would cause my machine to lock into a solid black screen when starting X. (Must be something to do with agpgart, but I don't know what.) Setting it to 1 (using nVidia's agp driver) would work, but only if I booted to Windows first and then did a soft reboot into Linux. But setting it to 0 (no agp) makes it run just fine from a cold boot. At last!

Now, I'm not sure what other ramifications disabling agp might have, but at least the thing works.

Paul
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