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Old 01-09-06, 06:31 AM   #1
EasyPrey
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Lightbulb Simple Idea: Why not program the ATSC modes right into the driver?

More and more people are connecting their nVidia card to their TVs.

The analog out has built-in modes. I.E. HD720p, HD1080i, HD1080p, etc. They eliminate all sorts of guess work and work like a champ. Sure if there is overscan or other problems, someone can come up with a custom Modeline. But they get you to a known working point (ATSC spec).

The digital side (DVI) is missing this simple feature. More and more people are connecting their HD equipment to the nVidia card. The first hurdle they face is getting the modeline right. Why do I need to know the exact timing of ATSC?

I have read the Modeline spec. I rather do taxes than read that again.

ATSC timing and stuff is all standarized. My cable box does not have a problem sending out ATSC output. Why do I have to become an expert in ATSC timing to get a simple image to display on my TV?

nVidia, please, please, pretty please. With sugar on top. Just program the ATSC modes right into the driver. It will solve a lot of problems: for you and the people who try to use your products.

Thanks.
-EasyPrey

Last edited by EasyPrey; 01-09-06 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 01-09-06, 10:26 PM   #2
davemoore
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Default Re: Simple Idea: Why not program ATSC modes right into the driver?

The modelines are part of the standard Xorg config file and have nothing to do with the Nvidia binary driver. You should direct this feature request to the Xorg developers.
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Old 01-10-06, 11:26 AM   #3
EasyPrey
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Exclamation Re: Simple Idea: Why not program ATSC modes right into the driver?

I agree that xorg people can do more. But it is obvious from your statement that you have never dealt with them.

Well, they just did a .1 update to their software. It took them over a decade to do that! Please see http://www.linuxedge.org/index.php?q=node/38

"Radical ideas" like you should not be an expert in video frame timing is lost on them. Their firm belief is that if you cannot put a scope to measure your monitor's refresh timing. You are too stupid to use a computer. WTF?

According to them, everyone needs to know the internal frame timing of a video frame. You just can't tell them 1024x786@60 Hz. That would make too much sense. No, users _have_ to know what are the sync timing (even though xorg can calculate it very easily in the driver).

The latest ATSC spec (rev (A/53), Revision D) is is a nice 104 page document. I suggest you read that, if you are ever having a problem sleeping. It is guaranteed to put you to sleep.

Back to the discussion. Sure xorg can do that (might take them 2 or 3 decades). But the nVidia driver can do it as well. It already does it for the analog output. Thats right. You don't need a modeline for that. nVidia takes care of that.

Why not extend the same courtesy to the digital signal as well?

Why do I have to became and expert in front porch and back porch timing just to display a simple image on my TV?

-EasyPrey
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