Go Back   nV News Forums > Linux Support Forums > NVIDIA Linux

Newegg Daily Deals

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-10-04, 10:10 PM   #13
Corona688
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by nyxs
That said nvidia & ati are making an effort for us freebies
Freebies? We ARE kind of buying their hardware... personally, linux compatibility is the ONLY reason I'm sticking to nvidia now, if their drivers continue to get less stable I'll have to see how well ATI will work with my system.
Corona688 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-04, 02:24 AM   #14
darius
foo
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 38
Default

They can't GPL it because that license will force them to release anything linked to GPL'd code that they distribute (try reading it some time).

Contrary to what leonbrooks said, the magic IS in the software, see the controversy about driver optimisation, and benchmark "optimisation".

Maybe you guys should run FreeBSD.. The boxes I put nvidia binary drivers on haven't crashed due to nvidia issues very frequently at all. I would prefer rock solid stability but HW accelerated 3d is still a fairly new thing for open source operating systems.
darius is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-04, 09:58 AM   #15
turbonow
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2
Default I need some help here!

´I hope you don't mind me throwing in my own 2 cents, since it does pertain to your topic of discussion.

I have just recently purchased, and begun using (Suse 9) Linux on my computer - I've been a Windows user all my life - and I'm thoroughly enjoying using Linux, because it is quite obvious to me that it is vastly superior to Windows in a variety of ways. But, I've run into a few speed bumps. For one thing, I'm using a modem with a Conexant chipset - I won't get into the details of that. The other is my video card, which is the reason I am here, of course.

I'm using a GeForce 2 MX video card, a little old, but the card is still working quite well. I was somewhat disappointed when I attempted to play tux racer on my computer that it said I needed 3D acceleration. I thought it was a joke. I mean it says right on the package that Linux supports all NVidia graphics cards, or something like that. Then I find out that NVidia doesn't release their drivers freely, or something. Apparently I need to download their Linux driver in order to activate 3D acceleration. No problem, right?

With my Conexant modem, my download speed is limited to 14.4 kbs. It took me an hour and a half to download NVidia's driver (5.5 MB). Being completely new to Linux, I messed around for a while trying to figure out how to install the NVidia driver, because the instructions say I have to install it from the console, so I needed to quickly learn some basic console commands, and learn how to install a driver in text mode.

I tried using xfree86 to configure my video card, and I must've done something wrong, because it messed up my system. My computer refused to go into a graphical window system. I was only able to access the console. I didn't know what to do to fix it, so I re-installed Linux. That's the last time I'm ever going to use xfree86.

I lost the copy of the NVidia driver that was installed on my machine, so I had to download it again. Another hour and a half wasted, on top of the time I spent reinstalling. So, then I figured out how to access the console while booting up - Suse makes it really easy - just choose failsafe mode when booting. I then managed to install the NVidia driver successfully - or so I thought.

I went back into KDE, but I was still unable to activate 3D acceleration for some unknown reason. I tried removing, and reinstalling my video card from Yast several times, but 3D acceleration still wouldn't come on. Then, I don't know what the heck happened, but when I tried turning on my machine the next day, my login screen had been all messed up. It wasn't the standard login screen I normally see in Suse. It also seemed odd that it didn't auto-login my default account like it normally does.

This new login screen didn't give me the usual options for restarting, or shutting down the machine, so I had to resort to using the power button, because KDE suddenly doesn't provide me with the option for shutting down or resetting like it normally does. The login screen also didn't give me options for which GUI interface I wanted to use - I normally use KDE. This login always went into X Windows, which I strongly dislike. I was able to access KDE through x windows by using a console command, but I hated having the x window border around everything, and found several nuances of x windows to be rather annoying.

Eventually, I got fed up with the way things were acting, and I didn't like hitting the power button to turn the machine off - I know how it can damage your system - so I reinstalled one more time. That's where I'm at currently.

I don't think I want to install NVidia's driver again, seeing how it's caused a lot of problems for me already. There's probably a very simple way to fix the problems I've had, but my knowledge of Linux is very limited, so I had to resort to fixing it the hard way. Honestly, I don't see how a video driver needs to alter my login in the slightest way.

Then I've come here, hoping to find a solution to my woes, and discovered that I'm far from being the only person to experience problems with NVidia's driver - particularly with Suse 9, like I'm using. I had always relied on NVidia to produce quality video drivers for their products under Windows, and feel shocked to find that their Linux driver is actually very buggy - judging from the number of people complaining about problems similar to my own.

I'm thinking of taking an alternate solution to this mess, and buying a new video card - preferably a (non-NVidia) card that has full support under Linux. Besides, I think it's about time I upgraded to a video card with more than 32 MB of RAM. I think I may take a similar solution to solve my problems with my modem, as well.

I apologize for writing such a long message, but I wanted to fully explain my situation. If you can give me a solution to my video problem, I'll be glad to hear it - and please explain it in a way that someone who has very limited experience with Linux can understand it. I'm very experienced in using Windows, but I'm very new to using Linux. It is possible that I may have accidentally changed a wrong setting in my login preferences, but I don't think that's what happened in this case.

That was what Kelderine sayd. I got the same problem. Cant run linux if i dont go in to X windows. You didnt gave him an answer. How should i do. I need som help here!
__________________
Jonta
turbonow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-04, 12:21 PM   #16
jdh30
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Cambridge, England.
Posts: 2
Default Re: I need some help here!

When nVidia say that their cards support Linux, they mean that you should always be able to get a 2D graphical display using Vesa. They do not mean that all of the features of your nVidia graphics card will be available. AFAIK, no nVidia graphics card is fully supported under Linux. Some of the cards (such as the GeForce 2MX) can't be used for 3D acceleration under certain setups. Other cards (such as the GeForce 3) are only missing some advanced OpenGL extensions (like render_to_texture).

I have had exactly the same problem as you with the same graphics card. The problem was with the nVidia driver, by nVidia's own admission, and they told me that the solution was to avoid using 3D. I tried everything to fix it (and I've been using Linux exclusively for 5 years, and I'm a coder) but I couldn't fix it. As I bought the card explicitly for writing my own applications using OpenGL, this did not make me happy. The solution which I found was to give the card away and buy a better card. I bought a GeForce 3 because nVidia is basically the only option when it comes to graphics cards for Linux for 3D. I suggest you do the same.

Also, I believe that Red Hat and Debian are considerably more common that Suse, so you may find that switching distros will help. Certainly with Debian, there are packages in the repository which setup the nVidia drivers for you.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by "using xfree86" to configure your video card, but you certainly shouldn't have to reinstall Linux - ever. If you're going to diddle with your "/etc/X11/XF86Config" file then you should always back it up, and if it doesn't work then just revert to using the old one. Presumably you lost the copy of the nVidia driver because you didn't back that up either. That's hardly nVidia's fault.

If your login screen is "messed up" then it is probably because the wrong login program has been run. This will not be an nVidia driver problem but is likely to be a problem with your distro (Suse) or because you accidentally changed it whilst fiddling with settings.

I would certainly advise against switching the machine off as this can cause irreversible file system and/or data corruption. If you did this after you had changed some system settings then this likely to ruin your OS. If you want to reboot then try switching to a console (using Ctrl+Alt+1) and either pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete to reboot, or logging in as root and typing "shutdown -r now" (-r for reboot, -h would shutdown and not restart). You should at least learn how to reboot your computer without X (the graphical display) before trying to change the fundamental settings of X.

If you want to change your login screen then change to a console (e.g. Ctrl+Alt+1), login as root, type "ps aux" to get a list of processes (programs) which are running and look for "gdm" or "xdm". Stop the current login program using something like "/etc/init.d/xdm stop". Then start "kdm" (the KDE login program) using "/etc/init.d/kdm restart".

I don't think that the nVidia driver is buggy, as such, I just think that it is not as easy to install as it could be. Running apt from the console under Debian is slightly easy. Is it not possible to create a graphical installer for the nVidia driver? It couldn't install the kernel module while X was running, but it could set up a script to try to do that the next time X started and revert to the previous settings if it didn't work.

If it is any consolation, there is little point in using the 3D acceleration on the MX cards as they are so slow. My GeForce 3 works beautifully. If you really want to go non-nVidia then you could buy an ATi card. They do have open-source drivers for Linux, but they suck (they are largely unoptimised, unlike the nVidia drivers which are closed-source but highly optimised). The lack of efficient drivers obviates any point in buying a fast ATi card.

Disclaimer: I've never used Suse and I've assumed that it's setup is much the same of Debian's, which might not be true.

Cheers,
Jon.
__________________
Cheers,
Jon.
jdh30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-04, 12:50 PM   #17
turbonow
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2
Default That solves much

My 3d acceleration works PERFECT. That was not the problem. It was the login. Now i can solve it. Thanks!. And i have a Nvidia Geforce 2 GTS and not an MX. Thanks
__________________
Jonta
turbonow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-04, 11:03 AM   #18
Corona688
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by darius
They can't GPL it because that license will force them to release anything linked to GPL'd code that they distribute (try reading it some time).
Untrue. Non-GPL stuff can use GPL libraries, they simply can't absorb GPLed code wholesale and call it their own. Try reading it sometime.
Corona688 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-04, 01:26 PM   #19
neel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

NVidia doesn't get it yet. They are too close to M$ to see though the FUD spread about OSS and GNU. Cource, I heard XBox 2 is going to be ATI, maybe they "grow apart" abit, lol.

First, NVidia is selling hardware, not software. Anything that increases the sale of hardware is a good thing, like supporting more OSes with your hardware esp. when the effort to do so is minimal.

Next, if NV GPL's it's driver source and ATI uses it, guess what - ATI's drivers are GPL'd too, including all the ATI extensions they needed to add to make it work. Otherwise, if ATI looks at the GPL'd source and tries to use it in closed source, they will have the EFF to deal with. Trust me, you'd rather be caught be the IRS for 10 years of tax fraud than deal with the EFF. It doesn't make news headlines, but the lawyers are pretty ruthless when enforcing the GPL.

Anything of great worth revealed by the opensourced code will still be covered in patents. NV has the right to let Linux use those patents, and deny ATI at the same time.

Adaptec has proven this method works. They open sourced all thier drivers for just about every product and now enjoy native linux/freebsd support without much effort. They still take an active role in their oss drivers, to make sure they are as fast and feature rich as they can be. But they don't have to lay awake at nighting wondering if the 2.6.5 patch they just did will work under 2.6.6.

AMD is seeing the light too, and it's showing. AMD64 distros are popping up, and IA64 seems to be lagging. Intel has to wonder about why RedHat has no IA64 Fedora, but yet does have an AMD64.

It's really just a matter of time. Another video card company will come up, and want to make an impact on their market share and OSS it's drivers. The only question is will nvidia wait to long to change and become a page in history, or will it manage to adapt and remain on top.
neel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-04, 09:54 PM   #20
yodaofborg
Registered User
 
yodaofborg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 25
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

Just thought i'd thank Nvidia, i now experience a %400 performace increase in OpenGL applications in linux32 v win32 (armagetron is a good example, with me scoring a respectable max 50fps under Windowz, but when compared to my 200fps+ in linux)... do i need to go on?

I have a P4 with a gforce fx5200, and have been using linux for a few years, i consider myself skilled in *NIX os's, so i had no problem installing the nvidia drivers (i have installed them on numorous *NIX's including a couple of custom build kernels) - however, PLEASE MAKE A CONTROL PANEL FOR *NIXERS NVIDIA...lol, or if anyone knows of a descent one that works under a 2.6 kernel with the *newer* cards, i'd be grateful for a mail... i have tried both nvtv *very dodgy* and yanc *only controls for the hardware cursor work...* - i do know my XF86Config-4 from my fstab, and have *before the fancy Xconfig and the likes* totally written the X server config files, but setting up twinview in dual display mode is a pain in the ass. PLEASE MAKE IT SIMPLE AND SOON!!


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If in doubt BACK IT UP, if playing about BACK IT UP, and if all else fails, you can smash it to bits, knowing your backups are safe lmao
yodaofborg is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 04-26-04, 11:38 AM   #21
SuLinUX
 
SuLinUX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 847
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

Seems to be ALOT of moaning in here and it's not a thread to take your frustrations out of nvidia, most of the time it's user error. I have compile the nvidia driver with every SuSE updated kernel, 2.6 - 2.6.5, 2.4.26 and SuSE 8.2 kernels. You people really should get off your arse and look or learn instead of blaming nvidia.

This thread should be locked instead of trolled.
__________________
AthlonXP 2600+ / nForce2 Asus A7N8X-X / PNY GeForce FX5900 Ultra / 1024Mb Samsung Ram /nForce Sound / Hansol 920D Plus 19" monitor / Lite-On 32x12x40 / 2x Maxtor HD 40Gb/80Gb / nVidia 7174 driver / Gnome 2.10.1 / Kernel 2.6.11.9 / Slackware 10.0
SuLinUX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-04, 09:17 PM   #22
RLNave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 22
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

If the NVIDIA-5336 driver works with the latest 2.6.x kernel , I would like to find out how. I have been compiling kernels from source since 2.6-test10. The NVIDIA-5336 kernel worked well up to version 2.6.4. Somewhere around 2.6.5 the
CONFIG_4KSTACK problem showed up. It was possible to get
NVIDIA-5336 to work by modifying the .config file in the kernel
source so that CONFIG_4KSTACK=n.
However, in subsequent versions currently 2.6.6-rc2 the 4KSTACK is the only option. NVIDIA-5336 apparently needs a 8 K stack to
run and locks up without it. With the most recent version 2.6.6-rc2 kernel that I tried the NVIDIA-5336 package will not even
compile. It complains about not being able to figure out the
video card version. I am sticking with Fedora Core 1 and
the 2.6.4 kernel until NVIDIA releases a new driver.

Fedora Core version 2 is scheduled for release on May 17.

I hope NVIDIA releases a new driver by then.

Otherwise Fedora users will be forced to switch to ATI cards.

( The current ATI driver installs with Fedora Core 1 and the
2.6.6 kernel )
RLNave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-04, 09:34 PM   #23
saturnotaku
Apple user. Deal with it.
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: The 'burbs, IL USA
Posts: 12,502
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

Quote:
Originally Posted by neel
NVidia doesn't get it yet. They are too close to M$ to see though the FUD spread about OSS and GNU. Cource, I heard XBox 2 is going to be ATI, maybe they "grow apart" abit, lol.
Microsoft was screwing with NVIDIA on the Xbox. NVIDIA wants nothing to do with the Xbox 2, who to turn to next? Matrox?

Quote:
First, NVidia is selling hardware, not software. Anything that increases the sale of hardware is a good thing, like supporting more OSes with your hardware esp. when the effort to do so is minimal.
NVIDIA doesn't sell hardware. MSI, Abit, Asus, BFG, eVGA, et al - they are the ones selling hardware. NVIDIA sells technology to hardware companies. Last time I checked on NVIDIA's site, they support pretty much every IBM-compatible OS out there, from FreeBSD to Linux to Windows. Problems are inevitable because there's such a plethora of hardware out there.


Quote:
AMD is seeing the light too, and it's showing. AMD64 distros are popping up, and IA64 seems to be lagging. Intel has to wonder about why RedHat has no IA64 Fedora, but yet does have an AMD64.
Have you stopped to consider the fact that the Athlon 64 is widely available to the general public and the Itanium is not?

Quote:
It's really just a matter of time. Another video card company will come up, and want to make an impact on their market share and OSS it's drivers. The only question is will nvidia wait to long to change and become a page in history, or will it manage to adapt and remain on top.
And that company will be........Bitboys!
saturnotaku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-04, 08:34 AM   #24
yodaofborg
Registered User
 
yodaofborg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 25
Default Re: If you have a problem, PLEASE read this first!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuLinUX
Seems to be ALOT of moaning in here and it's not a thread to take your frustrations out of nvidia, most of the time it's user error. I have compile the nvidia driver with every SuSE updated kernel, 2.6 - 2.6.5, 2.4.26 and SuSE 8.2 kernels. You people really should get off your arse and look or learn instead of blaming nvidia.

This thread should be locked instead of trolled.

I agree 100%, most of the bitching on this entire forum could be sorted out if the posters involved actually read the docs that come with the drivers,...lol, i know reading it a second, third, fourth, fith time is also a good idea....lol

I also have compiled the driver under lots of *nix kernels, (including my current 2.6.5...lol) not much effort involved, as long as i had the CORRECT kernel source inplace, and wotnot, the driver seems fine ever time !! (ya have got to expect a ikkle niggle here and there, afterall, HOW MANY *NIX'S ARE OUT THERE?? )

For such a diverse platform *even two *nix boxes with the same distro can be setup tottaly different, ie gcc and stuff...* I think nvidia are doing a great job!

IF YOU DONT LIKE THE NVIDIA DRIVER, DONT USE IT, BUT DONT BITCH, TILL YOU ARE 110% ITS NOT YOUR OWN FAULT!!!!!!!
yodaofborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
APM (nonsuspend) hard-lockups - I READ THE FAQ idangazit NVIDIA Linux 9 12-27-02 08:43 AM
Post working out problem with 40.xx trying to work problem out, ONLY system specs b5fan NVIDIA Windows Graphics Drivers 11 10-19-02 10:17 AM
nv30 problem rumor bob747b Rumor Mill 37 10-10-02 04:14 PM
Geforce 4 Go and X-Server Problem with shutdown rapljenovic NVIDIA Linux 2 08-30-02 11:11 AM
Nvidia Go on laptop, black border within XFree86 problem raxip NVIDIA Linux 3 07-31-02 11:58 AM

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2014, nV News.